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Who Is Icann?

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so who is ICANN?

http://www.icann.org/

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-13835997

A global internet body has voted to allow the creation of new website domain suffixes, the biggest change for the online world in years.

The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (Icann) plans to dramatically increase the number of domain endings from the current 22.

Internet address names will end with almost any word and be in any language.

Icann will begin taking applications next year, with corporations and cities expected to be among the first.

"Icann has opened the internet's addressing system to the limitless possibilities of the human imagination," said Rod Beckstrom, president and chief executive officer for Icann.

"No one can predict where this historic decision will take us."

There will be several hundred new generic top-level domain names (gTLDs), which could include such addresses as .google, .coke, or even .BBC.

There are currently 22 gTLDs, as well as about 250 country-level domain names such as .uk or .de.

It will cost $185,000 (£114,000) to apply for the suffixes, and companies would need to show they have a legitimate claim to the name they are buying.

Analysts say it is a price that global giants might be willing to pay - in order to maximise their internet presence.

The vote completes a six-year negotiation process and is the biggest change to the system since .com was first introduced 26 years ago.

Icann said it was beginning a global communications programme to raise awareness of the new domain names.

Applications will start on 12 January.

It appears they own the web. Who are they and why do they have the right to decide what happens regarding domain names and charge £114,000 for a suffixe?

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so who is ICANN?

http://www.icann.org/

http://www.bbc.co.uk...nology-13835997

A global internet body has voted to allow the creation of new website domain suffixes, the biggest change for the online world in years.

The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (Icann) plans to dramatically increase the number of domain endings from the current 22.

Internet address names will end with almost any word and be in any language.

Icann will begin taking applications next year, with corporations and cities expected to be among the first.

"Icann has opened the internet's addressing system to the limitless possibilities of the human imagination," said Rod Beckstrom, president and chief executive officer for Icann.

"No one can predict where this historic decision will take us."

There will be several hundred new generic top-level domain names (gTLDs), which could include such addresses as .google, .coke, or even .BBC.

There are currently 22 gTLDs, as well as about 250 country-level domain names such as .uk or .de.

It will cost $185,000 (£114,000) to apply for the suffixes, and companies would need to show they have a legitimate claim to the name they are buying.

Analysts say it is a price that global giants might be willing to pay - in order to maximise their internet presence.

The vote completes a six-year negotiation process and is the biggest change to the system since .com was first introduced 26 years ago.

Icann said it was beginning a global communications programme to raise awareness of the new domain names.

Applications will start on 12 January.

It appears they own the web. Who are they and why do they have the right to decide what happens regarding domain names and charge £114,000 for a suffixe?

they are the new Illuminati.

Cross them at your peril...

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Internet heavy mob.

Will send the boys round to break your legs if you don't renew your "web domain."

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In an attempt to answer the OP's question, according to Wikipedia, ICANN is a private sector, non-profit organisation to which the US Government has devolved control and everyday administration of IP addresses and their associated domain names. I presume that the original basis for this was that the Internet evolved from ARPAnet, a US military computer network that was opened to civilian use in the early '90s. Other organisations in other countries then developed data communications infrastructures that were compatible with it, and in order to connect they had to obtain addresses from ICANN.

So, basically, due to historical reasons, ICANN is a proxy of the US Government that in effect runs the Internet. I wonder what will happen if and when other countries object to this unilateral control (and of course, it's China I'm mainly thinking in terms of here)? If they decide that they're no longer going to conform with ICANN's addressing requirement and do their own thing, then they lose the universal compatibility of a single, global Internet, but I can't see any way in international law how they could remove the current Internet from US control, either. Hmmm.....

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In an attempt to answer the OP's question, according to Wikipedia, ICANN is a private sector, non-profit organisation to which the US Government has devolved control and everyday administration of IP addresses and their associated domain names. I presume that the original basis for this was that the Internet evolved from ARPAnet, a US military computer network that was opened to civilian use in the early '90s. Other organisations in other countries then developed data communications infrastructures that were compatible with it, and in order to connect they had to obtain addresses from ICANN.

So, basically, due to historical reasons, ICANN is a proxy of the US Government that in effect runs the Internet. I wonder what will happen if and when other countries object to this unilateral control (and of course, it's China I'm mainly thinking in terms of here)? If they decide that they're no longer going to conform with ICANN's addressing requirement and do their own thing, then they lose the universal compatibility of a single, global Internet, but I can't see any way in international law how they could remove the current Internet from US control, either. Hmmm.....

ICANN was set up precisely to address concerns about US government involvement. We saw some major improvements, like the long-overdue removal of Notwork Solutions's monopoly on .com/etc.

And "evolved from ARPAnet" is a convenient story. Yes, it's true up to a point (the oldest surviving internet protocols, including dns, originated there), but it's also deeply misleading. Today's internet has many ancestors, of which ARPAnet is just one.

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In an attempt to answer the OP's question, according to Wikipedia, ICANN is a private sector, non-profit organisation to which the US Government has devolved control and everyday administration of IP addresses and their associated domain names. I presume that the original basis for this was that the Internet evolved from ARPAnet, a US military computer network that was opened to civilian use in the early '90s. Other organisations in other countries then developed data communications infrastructures that were compatible with it, and in order to connect they had to obtain addresses from ICANN.

So, basically, due to historical reasons, ICANN is a proxy of the US Government that in effect runs the Internet. I wonder what will happen if and when other countries object to this unilateral control (and of course, it's China I'm mainly thinking in terms of here)? If they decide that they're no longer going to conform with ICANN's addressing requirement and do their own thing, then they lose the universal compatibility of a single, global Internet, but I can't see any way in international law how they could remove the current Internet from US control, either. Hmmm.....

I bet the directors are paid very well.

It appears to be a license to print money.

Should be a world body not run by the US of A.

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I bet the directors are paid very well.

It appears to be a license to print money.

Should be a world body not run by the US of A.

Who cares if it's run *in*, not by, the USA? Would you rather have an over-bureaucratic mess so that each country has a say in things (say like the UN or EU) or a small technically focused organisation?

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Who cares if it's run *in*, not by, the USA? Would you rather have an over-bureaucratic mess so that each country has a say in things (say like the UN or EU) or a small technically focused organisation?

I care. And I don't think anyone should have ownership of the internet.

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I care. And I don't think anyone should have ownership of the internet.

Someone has to organise the basic "nuts and bolts" of the internet, or it won't work properly.This include allocation of IP addresses and domain names.

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Someone has to organise the basic "nuts and bolts" of the internet, or it won't work properly.This include allocation of IP addresses and domain names.

I thought it was just a series of tubes.

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I thought it was just a series of tubes.

laugh.gif Well ICANN don't own the internet.The infrastructure is in the hands of military assets, academic institutions, private telco's, network carriers, web hosts, datacentres and so on. Its just a series of private networks hooked together. But certain bits likes DNS, IP addresses and domain names have to be organised or it just won't hang together.

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laugh.gif Well ICANN don't own the internet.The infrastructure is in the hands of military assets, academic institutions, private telco's, network carriers, web hosts, datacentres and so on. Its just a series of private networks hooked together. But certain bits likes DNS, IP addresses and domain names have to be organised or it just won't hang together.

Fortunately you can get IP addresses and DNS services from many providers. Some of them are good companies who will get it right, and be friendly and helpful if you need it.

But you do need root nameservers, and an authority to govern them. ICANN's role is directly analagous to allocating international 'phone codes, such as +44 for the UK. What comes after the +44 (the number within the UK) is delegated to UK telcos, and similarly actual domain names and IP addresses are delegated to ISPs and other providers.

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  • 276 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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