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Mikhail Liebenstein

Hackintosh

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I am currently trying to build a Hackintosh on an old AMD Athelon X2 that have. Seems a bit of a challenge, perhaps I should go Intel on this.

The image below, which is for Snow Leopard 10.6.1 is meant to work on AMD, but it is proving challenging, lots of crashes etc.

http://thepiratebay.org/torrent/5401125/SNOWLEO_MAC_Snow_Leopard_OSX86_64_For_INTEL_AMD_32_64_MBR_GUID

Perhaps I should just buy a Mac??

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Ran 10.5 on my Intel Quad, currently have some version of leopard on my Acer Aspire One netbook. Worked fine as long as you never updated the dot release, then it lost USB support.

If you pick the right hardware is easy, if you have strange GPU, sound, nic, or AMD chips it's gets harder.

I switched to Mac to get away from having to update drivers/plists/software/patches etc. The PC gets turned on about once every 6 months, the linux HTPC runs 24/7.

Personally just buy a Mac. On my third after having original the 1st gen Intel white macbook (sold to my folks and still going), a faster core2 white macbook that I had for 3.5 years and sold for £240 less than I paid. Now using a 11" Macbook Air.

Find away to buy via the ac.uk education store if you do.. much better prices and 3year support inc.

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Nope but I'm tempted.

Have you tried going down the virtualisation route?

http://geeknizer.com/install-snow-leopard-virtualbox/

It runs, but last time I tired there was no support for quartz extreme etc, so the GUI is very sluggish and certain programs won't run as it's missing (photobooth etc)

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Ran 10.5 on my Intel Quad, currently have some version of leopard on my Acer Aspire One netbook. Worked fine as long as you never updated the dot release, then it lost USB support.

If you pick the right hardware is easy, if you have strange GPU, sound, nic, or AMD chips it's gets harder.

I switched to Mac to get away from having to update drivers/plists/software/patches etc. The PC gets turned on about once every 6 months, the linux HTPC runs 24/7.

Personally just buy a Mac. On my third after having original the 1st gen Intel white macbook (sold to my folks and still going), a faster core2 white macbook that I had for 3.5 years and sold for £240 less than I paid. Now using a 11" Macbook Air.

Find away to buy via the ac.uk education store if you do.. much better prices and 3year support inc.

I have got an Acer Aspire One as my lounge web browsing machine, but the screen seems too small to me to really bother with OSX.

Out of interest how well does it run on an Atom based system?

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Ran 10.5 on my Intel Quad, currently have some version of leopard on my Acer Aspire One netbook. Worked fine as long as you never updated the dot release, then it lost USB support.

If you pick the right hardware is easy, if you have strange GPU, sound, nic, or AMD chips it's gets harder.

I switched to Mac to get away from having to update drivers/plists/software/patches etc. The PC gets turned on about once every 6 months, the linux HTPC runs 24/7.

Personally just buy a Mac. On my third after having original the 1st gen Intel white macbook (sold to my folks and still going), a faster core2 white macbook that I had for 3.5 years and sold for £240 less than I paid. Now using a 11" Macbook Air.

Find away to buy via the ac.uk education store if you do.. much better prices and 3year support inc.

I agree with you on Windows patches. That said, Ubuntu seems to be as frequent these days as Windows.

One thing I have noticed with Macs though is poor support for hardware, includin hardware that worked under previous versions, eg printers with driver SnowLeo 10.5, that don't work with 10.6.

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I have got an Acer Aspire One as my lounge web browsing machine, but the screen seems too small to me to really bother with OSX.

Out of interest how well does it run on an Atom based system?

I've got VirtualBox on my Acer Aspire One. Well my AA1 ZG8 (as "Acer Aspire One" covers a multitude of sins). The host OS is Ubuntu and that works great. I installed VB to run Android 3.0 Live, but that runs very slowly (and the screen resolution isnt quite right). Will have to look into installing Android properly and configuring.

Wouldn't expect too much from a netbook in terms of running multiple guest OS's, however by other AA1 has the processor, that has the virtualisation extensions (you may have to enable them in the BIOS). Whether it makes makes a jot of difference I'm not sure, I think I have read the performance is worse with VirtualBox but its been a year or two since I looked into all this and no doubt a lot has changed in the meantime.

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I have got an Acer Aspire One as my lounge web browsing machine, but the screen seems too small to me to really bother with OSX.

Out of interest how well does it run on an Atom based system?

I never really used it as I already had my Macbook. The AA1 came with limpus linux, I swapped the wifi card for airport compatible one and added another 1GB of ram I had around. It seemed fine for web surfing (firefox, ad-block, flask-block etc), itunes and various other tasks. My brother used it as he main PC for about 9months (till he hit update and could no longer sync his ipod). Wouldn't sleep or wake up correctly tho. The screen is too small really, I had a utility on the dashboard that let you scale the display output so some for the fix windows (settings etc) fitted.

My second AA1 ran ubuntu netbook remix for while but never even left the shelf where if ran as server, doing torrents, webproxy rewriting & ad-block if you were on the network with iphone and was my vpn inbound endpoint.

The Mac 'just works' as they say, while everything else in the house gets hacks & tweaked

I agree with you on Windows patches. That said, Ubuntu seems to be as frequent these days as Windows.

One thing I have noticed with Macs though is poor support for hardware, includin hardware that worked under previous versions, eg printers with driver SnowLeo 10.5, that don't work with 10.6.

My 10.04 ubuntu running XBMC at least doesn't force download and installing the updates, but just tells me about them. And even if applied it's a quick 'apt-get upgrade' that doesn't seem to stop or restart anything.

Never been one for printers, just know my last HP all-in-one installed a crap load of not very Maclike software to a everything. Non of it need as you use the printers build in webserver if you really wanted too.

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I never really used it as I already had my Macbook. The AA1 came with limpus linux, I swapped the wifi card for airport compatible one and added another 1GB of ram I had around. It seemed fine for web surfing (firefox, ad-block, flask-block etc), itunes and various other tasks. My brother used it as he main PC for about 9months (till he hit update and could no longer sync his ipod). Wouldn't sleep or wake up correctly tho. The screen is too small really, I had a utility on the dashboard that let you scale the display output so some for the fix windows (settings etc) fitted.

My second AA1 ran ubuntu netbook remix for while but never even left the shelf where if ran as server, doing torrents, webproxy rewriting & ad-block if you were on the network with iphone and was my vpn inbound endpoint.

The Mac 'just works' as they say, while everything else in the house gets hacks & tweaked

I think that is the issue with Hackintosh. Whilst it is fun, in a two fingers up at Apple sort of way, it is a bit like saying I want to run an OS for which there is no proper support and for which drivers for my hardware are sadly lacking, and where updates basically entail a complete rebuild. It actually found it easier to run either Ubuntu or Debian on my ARM based Sheeva plug, and this included loads of bootloader configuration via Putty over serial USB.

On the AA1, which is what I am currently writing on, I immediately removed Limpus and stuck Ubuntu on it. I am currently running 11.04 (Natty Narwhal). Ubuntu seems to pretty much always work straight out of the box (well ISO file).

My 10.04 ubuntu running XBMC at least doesn't force download and installing the updates, but just tells me about them. And even if applied it's a quick 'apt-get upgrade' that doesn't seem to stop or restart anything.

Never been one for printers, just know my last HP all-in-one installed a crap load of not very Maclike software to a everything. Non of it need as you use the printers build in webserver if you really wanted too.

I really like Ubuntu. As a Linux challenger to Windows it is very credible, and I have found it generally works well with new and legacy hardware, certainly much better than Macs. That said, I still reckon Windows is the easiest for 95% of the population.

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Just avoid the new "Unity" interface.

I think its OK for a netbook. Quite "Android" in appearance.

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  • 284 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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