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6 Yr Old House... Structural Survey?

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The house I am going for is a six yr old 3 bed semi. I've read a fair few websites suggesting just the Homebuyers report for something so new, but read other websites where some denounce those reports as not being noncommittal where potential issues arise and rather superficial.

This is meant to be our home for decades so am tempted to try and get as many issues smoked out as early as poss, plus I'm a naturally paranoid sort anyway meaning I would suspect shonkiness in the build unless someone can reassure me otherwise. Structural survey might be worth the extra cost...

That where my thinking is at the mo... what are your thoughts, opinions, suggestions?

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The house I am going for is a six yr old 3 bed semi. I've read a fair few websites suggesting just the Homebuyers report for something so new, but read other websites where some denounce those reports as not being noncommittal where potential issues arise and rather superficial.

This is meant to be our home for decades so am tempted to try and get as many issues smoked out as early as poss, plus I'm a naturally paranoid sort anyway meaning I would suspect shonkiness in the build unless someone can reassure me otherwise. Structural survey might be worth the extra cost...

That where my thinking is at the mo... what are your thoughts, opinions, suggestions?

Is it not covered by a 10 year NHBC certificate?

Edited by Berk-hater

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Is it not covered by a 10 year NHBC certificate?

It is, but my thinking was that I'll be needing someone to identify defects for me in order for me to get the builder to fix them now? Else I risk more extensive and hence disruptive fixes later on, potentially after the certificate has expired (if they take a while to start causing real damage)

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It is, but my thinking was that I'll be needing someone to identify defects for me in order for me to get the builder to fix them now? Else I risk more extensive and hence disruptive fixes later on, potentially after the certificate has expired (if they take a while to start causing real damage)

I have bought many new builds over the years. Every single one has had an endless list of snags to be fixed by the builder. On the last development I purchased on there were problems with subsidence on some of the houses. I would say in 2004/5 they were just throwing them up.

I would say that over all it is definitely worth getting a structural survey if only for your own peace of mind. I would trust the volume builders (if your potential purchase is built by one) in this country about as much as I would trust an estate agent.

There are plenty of horror stories out there, don't let yours be one of them for the sake of a few hundred ££s

B)

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Personally I wouldn't bother with a full structural, but then I didn't bother with one when I bought my Victorian house a few years ago.

Perhaps if you are naturally paranoid you may be best to go with a full structural just to put your mind at rest, although it's probably slightly overkill.

I certainly wouldn't be relying on the NHBC cover in any event.

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Personally I wouldn't bother with a full structural, but then I didn't bother with one when I bought my Victorian house a few years ago.

Perhaps if you are naturally paranoid you may be best to go with a full structural just to put your mind at rest, although it's probably slightly overkill.

I certainly wouldn't be relying on the NHBC cover in any event.

All the more reason to get a full structural if the NHBC cover is poor - at least you'll be buying knowing (hopefully) any problems with the place.

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Guest eight

Personally I wouldn't bother with a full structural, but then I didn't bother with one when I bought my Victorian house a few years ago.

Same here. You've got to assume that when a house has been standing that long any problems should already have become evident. Or in the case of the roof, for instance, you'll probably be budgeting for complete replacement at some point instead of piecemeal repair anyway.

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  • 276 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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