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Are We About To Go Back To The 1950S

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The swinging sixties generation of the UK benfitted from the austerity of the 1950s and the war/austerity of the 1940s.

The war was cr*ppy enough for the UK but it so economically shafted the UK that there was no real economic recovery until the early 1960s. Is this where we are now - 1945ish?

Brits who go out of the UK post-WW2 seemed to flourish and prosper, especially those who went to countries, such as the UK, which had huge economic growth ahead of it. Those who stayed went through a pretty miserable post-WW2 period of about 15 years until the early Sixties.

I am just voicing whether we now have such a miserable 10 to 20 years ahead of us?

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The swinging sixties generation of the UK benfitted from the austerity of the 1950s and the war/austerity of the 1940s.

The war was cr*ppy enough for the UK but it so economically shafted the UK that there was no real economic recovery until the early 1960s. Is this where we are now - 1945ish?

Brits who go out of the UK post-WW2 seemed to flourish and prosper, especially those who went to countries, such as the UK, which had huge economic growth ahead of it. Those who stayed went through a pretty miserable post-WW2 period of about 15 years until the early Sixties.

I am just voicing whether we now have such a miserable 10 to 20 years ahead of us?

Most people in the 1950's had "never had it so good" though.

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The swinging sixties generation of the UK benfitted from the austerity of the 1950s and the war/austerity of the 1940s.

The war was cr*ppy enough for the UK but it so economically shafted the UK that there was no real economic recovery until the early 1960s. Is this where we are now - 1945ish?

Brits who go out of the UK post-WW2 seemed to flourish and prosper, especially those who went to countries, such as the UK, which had huge economic growth ahead of it. Those who stayed went through a pretty miserable post-WW2 period of about 15 years until the early Sixties.

I am just voicing whether we now have such a miserable 10 to 20 years ahead of us?

probably not because the 50s decade wise and 60s to a lesser extent had the strongest real economic growth in the last century in the west,

the mid 60s it started slowing so they replaced it with inflation, which lay relatively dormant as it has the habit of until the 70s when it took off but the seeds were sown in the mid 60s

Edited by georgia o'keeffe

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Most people in the 1950's had "never had it so good" though.

That is what they were told to keep them in their places. The use of that phrase in the then cinema news reels, limited TV and on the radio actually made people think they were doing OK. In fact, it was pretty miserable - but preferable to be bombed or having a Japanese guy pop up and try to shoot you.

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The country was being rebuilt, there was a lot of work about.

True they screwed up because they put everything back as it was rather than redesigning the country and it's infrastructure but this austerity is going to be something entirely different.

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I just remember the late 1950s. There were two car owners on our street. The milk float was horse drawn. 405 lines black and white television. No central heating or double glazing. My mum had yet to acquire her first washing machine. We didn't have a fridge.

Back to the 1950s? I bl00dy well hope not.

Edit: and my Dad bought a decent house for an affordable price so it was not all bad.

Edited by Freeholder

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The UK could still (just) think of itself as a world power in the 50s. Although Germany was already on the way to overtaking us, we didn't have competition from the likes of Brazil, China, India etc in selling our products.

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The UK could still (just) think of itself as a world power in the 50s. Although Germany was already on the way to overtaking us, we didn't have competition from the likes of Brazil, China, India etc in selling our products.

If this subject interests you I suggest you read the Pride and Fall series of four books by Correlli Barnett. He analyses the collapse of British power exhaustively and very readably.

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I just remember the late 1950s. There were two car owners on our street. The milk float was horse drawn. 405 lines black and white television. No central heating or double glazing. My mum had yet to acquire her first washing machine. We didn't have a fridge.

Back to the 1950s? I bl00dy well hope not.

Thing is we won't have much choice. IMO there is insufficient production and wealth generation within the economy to support everybody at the standard of living we are all accustomed to.

I strongly believe that in twenty years time foreign holidays will be for the very rich, car ownership will be rare and austerity will be commonplace :(

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If you're saying all we have to look forward to after 10-15 years of austerity and falling real living standards will be Lulu I think I'll end it all now.

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Thing is we won't have much choice. IMO there is insufficient production and wealth generation within the economy to support everybody at the standard of living we are all accustomed to.

I strongly believe that in twenty years time foreign holidays will be for the very rich, car ownership will be rare and austerity will be commonplace :(

I am off to explain to the young people in the family that they will have to get rich to live like I do. I like the idea of rich relatives in my declining years. Go kids go.

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That is what they were told to keep them in their places. The use of that phrase in the then cinema news reels, limited TV and on the radio actually made people think they were doing OK. In fact, it was pretty miserable - but preferable to be bombed or having a Japanese guy pop up and try to shoot you.

No we had "never had it so good." Britain even at the height of empire was a sh*t hole.

And we made tons of stuff, cars, steel etc.. but the domestic market was severely rationed and discouraged. It was a case of "export or die."

In those days Britain lived or died on the strength by its "balance of payments." They don't even bother to read those out on the news any more. Its a good job as we would die laughing!

Much better to rely on the ******** economy, based on banking and HPI and London sucking up despot/oligarch hot money. Just close your eyes and think of England.

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<br />Yep they won the war, haha<br />

We were stll paying off our debts to (indirectly the Rothschilds etc) USA financers until I think early Millennium years.

The subsequent years after, (Fabian) Brown and his City cronies went all out on their 'mission' to help destroy the UK!

Edited by erranta

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The swinging sixties generation of the UK benfitted from the austerity of the 1950s and the war/austerity of the 1940s.

The war was cr*ppy enough for the UK but it so economically shafted the UK that there was no real economic recovery until the early 1960s. Is this where we are now - 1945ish?

Brits who go out of the UK post-WW2 seemed to flourish and prosper, especially those who went to countries, such as the UK, which had huge economic growth ahead of it. Those who stayed went through a pretty miserable post-WW2 period of about 15 years until the early Sixties.

I am just voicing whether we now have such a miserable 10 to 20 years ahead of us?

The US has just clocked up 30 years of absolutely flat median wages, an entire generation of middle income earners that has achieved zero financial progress. And if anything the situation there for the average working man is now not just flat but declining, in other worse a grim situation is getting worse.

In the UK we're only about ten or twelve years into the flatlining income pattern, but in both cases this history of stagnant middle incomes significantly pre-dates the 2008 crisis, So never mind the financial crash, a picture was emerging even before Lehmann Brothers and the Northern Rock of a post industrial western world that's turning out very differently to our inbuilt assumptions that each generation is materially better off than the preceeding generation. For the west the world may be returning to that Malthusian stagnation where not just decades but centuries would roll past with absolutely no change in living standards.

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If this subject interests you I suggest you read the Pride and Fall series of four books by Correlli Barnett. He analyses the collapse of British power exhaustively and very readably.

+1; The Lost Victory especially. His essential thesis was that whereas the former Axis countries of Europe concentrated on rebuilding their industrial infrastructure and capacity during the period 1945-60 approx. (basically because the Americans were paying and that's what they decided should happen), Britain put housing and social security first, and economic rebuilding second. The coal, rail and steel industries were all knackered and using technology that was between one and three generations obsolete. However, Labour had campaigned hard (including in by-elections that took place during the war itself; and on this area, Paul Addison's The Road to 1945 is well worth a read) on the mantra of 'no return to the days of the depression': that message really struck home at the 1945 election, added to which Britain was not occupied either during the war or immediately after it, and therefore was in a position actually to implement that policy. While we got the NHS and cosy prefabs in the new towns a lot earlier than the Germans got similar creature comforts, so argues Barnett, we paid the price in lower overall standards of living more or less until Thatcher.

Edited by The Ayatollah Buggeri

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The US has just clocked up 30 years of absolutely flat median wages, an entire generation of middle income earners that has achieved zero financial progress. And if anything the situation there for the average working man is now not just flat but declining, in other worse a grim situation is getting worse.

In the UK we're only about ten or twelve years into the flatlining income pattern, but in both cases this history of stagnant middle incomes significantly pre-dates the 2008 crisis, So never mind the financial crash, a picture was emerging even before Lehmann Brothers and the Northern Rock of a post industrial western world that's turning out very differently to our inbuilt assumptions that each generation is materially better off than the preceeding generation. For the west the world may be returning to that Malthusian stagnation where not just decades but centuries would roll past with absolutely no change in living standards.

from mid-reagan-era onwards, US politics has been controlled by corporatist conservatives (mostly called Bush) and Democrats. Democrats you would expect to establish the social agenda and overspend a bit, and then, traditionally, the Republicans would come along, assume the social agenda of the prior democrat govt, but achieve it with the necessary compromise to balance the books. This ended part-way thru the Reagan administration and was finished off completely by the Bushes. So the natural balance between a left-wing social-agenda-biases party and a right-wing financial-balance-biased party was lost. This is where, to my mind, the US lost its way.

As far as I can tell conservative p[olitics in this country never went that way, so I surmise that we wonb't see stagnation of living standards, furthermore, the national debt after WW2 was 500% of GDP, ours, even considering bad off-balance sheet liabilities and at the maximum in 2014, will be half to a fifth of that (depending on how you interpret the figure). We do not look in so bad a position. I feel that our biggest threat is the poor level of education of many in their 20s who really should have vocational skills by now and would have if they were in Central Europe.

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we paid the price in lower overall standards of living more or less until Thatcher.

As we worked and accepted the austerity years to rebuild the devastation caused by WWII, along comes the 1960s and we once again grow in an exciting period. Right boss we said we done our bit and you are now doing well, how about our little share of this success.

To which the reply was get on your bike, the rest is history. ;)

Not forgetting single parents left by the war having to put their children in care, no problem let`s send them to Australia and Canada for a better life, even that came back to haunt us. :rolleyes:

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  • 311 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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