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Homes That Leak Energy Must Pay More Tax

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Families who reject green measures such as insulating their homes should be hit with higher council tax bills, Energy Secretary Chris Huhne has urged.

The Liberal Democrat minister said he expected 'enlightened' councils to favour homeowners who made their properties more energy efficient.

Mr Huhne was immediately slapped down by Eric Pickles, the Local Government Secretary, whose spokesman insisted this would not happen.

'People are fed up with Labour's council-tax rises, and there is no appetite among the public for more,' he said.

Local authorities have been encouraged to offer incentives to residents who insulate their homes by taking out special 'Green Deal' loans. But this is the first time a minister has suggested the rewards should be funded by higher tax bills for others.

Mr Huhne told MPs on the Environmental Audit Committee that local government could play a 'very significant' role in reducing carbon emissions by subsidising greener households through higher bills for residents who don't insulate their lofts or walls, or install double glazing.

His extraordinary intervention comes as householders face inflation-busting power bills this winter. Scottish Power said last week it would raise gas bills by 20%, while Centrica, which owns British Gas, warned that further increases were inevitable.

Although wholesale gas prices are high, much of the burden on residents is a result of green stealth taxes now built into bills.

The row came as John Cridland, director-general of the CBI, warned the latest carbon levies were 'counter-productive' and would make Britain's steel and chemicals industries less competitive on the world stage.

He called for the Government to axe some climate-change taxes - and exempt energy-intensive businesses from others.

Bet you'll be seeing council rats walking around the neighbourhood with these come winter.

800px-Thermal_imaging_camera_side.jpg

So buying that big old house is not a good idea, btw.

FWIW, a modern house is one of the most energy inefficient systems possible, from an engineering point of view.

Edited by cashinmattress

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FWIW, a modern house is one of the most energy inefficient systems possible, from and engineering point of view.

Modern ones are pretty good...1980's Barrett boxes...not so hot ;):D

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No excuse with loft insulation.

£3 a roll you don't have an excuse.

However buying double glazing is a bit on the prohibitive side especially if you don't have much spare cash.

Hmm, loft insulation. That's going to save you very little. It only really slows down the heat transfer to the outside.

You'd be better off keeping mass in the house that is conductive, such as heavy dark granite near windows, etc. There are lots of little things that make a difference....

Houses. A cube is a bad idea, too much surface area.

But at the end of the day, energy prices are going to double every two years or so from here on in. Get used to it.

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If they had some kind of tax on fuel, then people who have inefficient homes would end up paying more.

They ought to consider taxing road fuel too, to make people with big cars stump up extra.

Oh, hang on.

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How many UK jobs does the government want to destroy to subsidise German steel mills and wind turbine manufacturers?

Edited by cells

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Surely if they REALLY wanted to do this.. why not just legislate that energy bills should be charged at an increasing rate with consumption rather than the opposite as we have at the moment.

That way you would be targeting people using a lot of energy rather than taxing a little old lady in her old listed home with blanket and one bar heater.

A typically over-complex solution to a non-existent problem. Politics at it's best.

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Houses. A cube is a bad idea, too much surface area.

Eh? Short of having a sphere a cube has the smallest surface / volume ratio.

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<br />How many UK jobs does the government want to destroy to subsidise German steel mills and wind turbine manufacturers?<br />

There's that and the fact that the energy companies signed rip-off agreements with the landowners so they get paid even when the damn things are not working.

The energy companies even cut them off the power grid when they are working at full power inefficiently wasting electric and forcing up consumer bills - cos they load all the costs on to us for THEIR inefficiency as they waste electric production 40 days a year.

It will get worse as they build more Turbines which only last 25 years - then need totally replacing costing the UK population more!

Can these Turbines survive the freak 100ft waves they get in North sea that hit the rigs?

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/energy/windpower/8573885/Wind-turbines-switched-off-on-38-days-every-year.html

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Surely if they REALLY wanted to do this.. why not just legislate that energy bills should be charged at an increasing rate with consumption rather than the opposite as we have at the moment.

That way you would be targeting people using a lot of energy rather than taxing a little old lady in her old listed home with blanket and one bar heater.

A typically over-complex solution to a non-existent problem. Politics at it's best.

God what a ridiculous idea. Have you been on the beers. :D

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God what a ridiculous idea. Have you been on the beers. :D

i think theyve overextended the heading, you can cut it to, govt says

"Must pay more tax"

You can look forward to that turn of phrase alot over the next decade i imagine

Edited by georgia o'keeffe

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No, far too simple for politicians - no jobs in it. In fact as well as wanting to discourage fuel waste, they have a low VAT on heating, a winter fuel allowance that could be combined with state pensions, top ups, FiT payments for your solar and a free bus pass for good measure - best make it as mind-numbingly, incomprehensibly circular as possible. Churning is good.

Plus, no excuse for the B-EUROcrats to invite themselves into peoples homes and survey their lifestyles, posessions and invade their privacy. Will they come round with video cameras - you bet they will. On the toilet? We'll need to check the plumbing insulation.

It will make the TSA abuses in the US look like childs play.

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I think we all saw this coming as soon as they used pretty much the same colour coding system on HIPs energy reports as they do on car tax rates...

There's only so many colours in the rainbow. :ph34r:

The whole climate change scam has only ever been over one thing - getting another tax stream in place and using the guilt factor to get away with it.

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I think we all saw this coming as soon as they used pretty much the same colour coding system on HIPs energy reports as they do on car tax rates...

But those ratings are ********. I live in a one-bedroom flat that is double glazed but is rated D's and E's in my vague attempts to buy a place I have seen semidetached houses with better ratings.

Surely by definition my one bedroom is going to be more efficient than a 2/3 bedroom semi? There are only two windows in the entire place and there are people to all sides and below so heat is going to be shared around for more efficiently than in a larger house....

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Hmm, loft insulation. That's going to save you very little. It only really slows down the heat transfer to the outside.

You'd be better off keeping mass in the house that is conductive, such as heavy dark granite near windows, etc. There are lots of little things that make a difference....

Houses. A cube is a bad idea, too much surface area.

But at the end of the day, energy prices are going to double every two years or so from here on in. Get used to it.

Insulation is actually one of the most cost effective ways to reduce energy loss, other than turning off the heating

Also, actually cube is the most efficient building shape

Interested to know where get the figures saying energy prices doubling every 2 years?

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Bet you'll be seeing council rats walking around the neighbourhood with these come winter.

800px-Thermal_imaging_camera_side.jpg

I wonder how much these cost and whether it owuld be worthb investing in one when going to view houses?

I am disgusted by how poor EA prepared details of housing - few seem to know if a house has an internet connection, what the house is built from, whether it has cavity wall insulation, etc, etc, that it would be great turning up with one of these.

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Hmm, loft insulation. That's going to save you very little. It only really slows down the heat transfer to the outside.

That is what is meant by insulation. If you slow the rate at which heat goes out, then you slow the rate at which you need to add it.

I suppose you could brick up all the windows and doors.

Houses. A cube is a bad idea, too much surface area.

What shape do you suggest? I'd suggest a Klein bottle as everything is on the inside...oh, wait a minute everything is on the outside too. About the only thing better than a cube would be a sphere considering volume to surface area, but Ikea don't make curved bookshelves.

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They already do pay more tax if the house is inefficient. Better off getting out of the way of companies who provide solutions to energy efficiency.

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Insulation is actually one of the most cost effective ways to reduce energy loss, other than turning off the heating

Also, actually cube is the most efficient building shape

Interested to know where get the figures saying energy prices doubling every 2 years?

The most efficient 'shape' is of course the sphere by volume, with a cube way down the ladder. The reason you live in a cube is because that is what we've all become accustomed to in Britain and most of the west.

There are other ways to affect the heat loss in your home beyond loft insulation, and lets be clear, all you are doing is preventing heat loss, no matter what systems you put in place. So many people are convinced that their double glazing and loft insulation are making them save money, yet the walls between the windows and doors are nothing more than void spaces.

One can install a heat exchanger, which is not too expensive. Put in a humidifier system. As I said before, one can install mass in the house which is going to store energy, such as granite near a window. Black or dark curtains, etc... ground source heat pumps for a new build, ring main heating, wood burners, refuse burners....there are a multitude of things you can do. Turn down the water temperature, turn down the thermostat, open/close doors and windows as required, etc...

The cost of energy is going up, so we've been told, unless you've had your head buried in the sand... We are running out of indigenous energy very quickly and have been net importing energy for more than a decade. Our wise government is spending almost nil on energy infrastructure, instead handing over the reins to foreign corporate and state interests, and feeding taxes directly to banks, the euro coffers, etc...

Sheesh, do you own homework, I don't know why I'm bothering but...

cv_gas_pro_dem.gif

Do you think that Russia, Norway, and the Middle East are all of a sudden going to see Britain as the victim and start gifting us energy?

BTW: I work in the UK oil and gas sector and have an idea of what's going on out there.

Edited by cashinmattress

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I wonder how much these cost and whether it owuld be worthb investing in one when going to view houses?

I am disgusted by how poor EA prepared details of housing - few seem to know if a house has an internet connection, what the house is built from, whether it has cavity wall insulation, etc, etc, that it would be great turning up with one of these.

Well, if I was a builder I'd buy one of these and scan every house looking for likely candidates for spring summer, or maybe get a gooble type mapping rig on my car and scan the country...

TIC cameras aren't very expensive.

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I wonder how much these cost and whether it owuld be worthb investing in one when going to view houses?

I am disgusted by how poor EA prepared details of housing - few seem to know if a house has an internet connection, what the house is built from, whether it has cavity wall insulation, etc, etc, that it would be great turning up with one of these.

They're about £1800 for a reasonable one like a Fluke.

Wont be much good to you though unless you go around in the cold months when people have their heating on.

Wont be much good to you with tight fkers like me that dont put the heating on either :D

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They're about £1800 for a reasonable one like a Fluke.

You can also rent them from a decent equipment hire, borrow one from a fireman, or build your own using a thermopile based kit for probably less than £200 quids (if you are electronically gifted, and handy with a soldering iron).

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Families who reject green measures such as insulating their homes should be hit with higher council tax bills, Energy Secretary Chris Huhne has urged.

I would willingly go to prison rather than accept or take notice of anything this immoral disgusting politician ever got into law. :angry:

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  • 294 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
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      • Even
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      • up 5%



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