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Tax Abusers Of The Week

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Tax abuser of the weekChief Executive

SALFORD CITY COUNCIL

Greater Manchester

To £135,000 + Benefits + Relocation

Already a successful Chief Executive or Senior Manager in a large and diverse organisation, you will be a strategic thinker with outstanding leadership skills honed within a performance management culture. Your demonstrable track record of achievement will be second to none, delivering quality through people.

Most pointless job of the week

Corporate Director For Continuous Improvement

Aberdeen City Council

North Scotland

C. £97,000

You'll develop systems and strategies that affect the organisation from policy-making to the frontline. A major part of your role will be to proactively engage with local communities - creating the structures, processes, performance measures.

Mass tax abuse of the week

(1) Corporate Director, Children and Young People's Services

(2) Corporate Director, Environment

(3) Corporate Director, Children and Young People's Services

GATENBY SANDERSON

Durham

£90k - £120k (each)

Other tax abusers

Chief Executive

Yorkshire Forward

Yorkshire & Humberside

£150,000 p.a

You will bring significant personal credibility to influence partners from private, academic and public sectors at the very highest level. You will also promote internal change, inspiring a culture of empowerment and alignment.

Executive Director Family & Children's Services

The Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea

Central London

£133,000 plus benefits

Executive Director Family & Children's Services.

Executive Director - Urban Living

Harrow Council

North London

c.£130k plus benefits

Your professional background is not important although experience in managing some of the service areas within Urban Living would be an advantage. What we really want is someone with outstanding management.

Executive Director, Environmental Services

London Borough of Waltham Forest

East London

c.£118k

You will capitalise on our commitment to improvement and innovation by significantly contributing to and delivering our wide-ranging services, ensuring that the environment remains at the top of our corporate agenda.

Regional Director

Government Office for the West Midlands

West Midlands

£110,000

You will lead the Government Office for the West Midlands, ensuring the coherent delivery of policies and programmes and influencing relevant policy development in Whitehall.

Director - Property Services - Urban Living

Harrow Council

West London

£105,000

Reporting to the Executive Director of Urban Living, this appointment will take full responsibility for getting the most from our property assets. It will also support our partnership working and our ambitious programmes.

Director of Adult Social Services

Bristol City Council

Avon

£90,855 - £104,177

You'll have extensive experience working with a range of service partners and be able to demonstrate contributions to corporate goals.

Strategic Director Community Services

North Tyneside Council

Tyne & Wear

c.£100k

This is an exciting new role with an extensive portfolio covering Adult Social Care, Leisure and Culture, Housing Services, Neighbourhood Services, Customer Services and Revenues and Benefits.

Strategic Director Organisational Improvement

North Tyneside Council

Tyne & Wear

c.£100k

This is a key post responsible for driving improvement, financial planning & management and e-government. The postholder will also make a vital contribution to improving corporate governance arrangements.

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Guest Bart of Darkness
Corporate Director For Continuous Improvement

A major part of your role will be to proactively engage with local communities - creating the structures, processes, performance measures.

You may also be the vector of a new paradigm, as proactive team players synergize an out-of-the-box strategy of functionality and infotainment, re-engineering the learning curve framework of your dotted-line relationship. :)

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Guest magnoliawalls

These two caught my attention:

Executive Director - Urban Living

Harrow Council

North London

c.£130k plus benefits

Your professional background is not important although experience in managing some of the service areas within Urban Living would be an advantage. What we really want is someone with outstanding management.

surely they could afford someone's outstanding manager for £130k plus benefits? :blink:

Executive Director, Environmental Services

London Borough of Waltham Forest

East London

c.£118k

You will capitalise on our commitment to improvement and innovation by significantly contributing to and delivering our wide-ranging services, ensuring that the environment remains at the top of our corporate agenda.

I looked up 'capitalise' in an online dictionary

v 1: supply with capital, as of a business by using a combination of capital used by investors and debt capital provided by lenders

2: draw advantages from; "he is capitalizing on her mistake"

3: write in capital letters

4: compute the present value of a business or an income

5: consider expenditures as capital assets rather than expenses

6: convert (a company's reserve funds) into capital

in what sense do they mean 'capitalise'? :huh:

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These two caught my attention:

I looked up 'capitalise' in an online dictionary

v 1: supply with capital, as of a business by using a combination of capital used by investors and debt capital provided by lenders

2: draw advantages from; "he is capitalizing on her mistake"

3: write in capital letters

4: compute the present value of a business or an income

5: consider expenditures as capital assets rather than expenses

6: convert (a company's reserve funds) into capital

Its obviously 3:, though they may need some help if joined up writing is involved.

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Tax abuser of the weekChief Executive

SALFORD CITY COUNCIL

Greater Manchester

To £135,000 + Benefits + Relocation

Already a successful Chief Executive or Senior Manager in a large and diverse organisation, you will be a strategic thinker with outstanding leadership skills honed within a performance management culture. Your demonstrable track record of achievement will be second to none, delivering quality through people.

Errrrrm, I think I'll be a devil's advocate for this thread :ph34r: .

What would a CEO in a private company with an equivalent staff count and budget to Salford City Council expect to be paid?

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Errrrrm, I think I'll be a devil's advocate for this thread :ph34r: .

What would a CEO in a private company with an equivalent staff count and budget to Salford City Council expect to be paid?

1. A CEO of a private company presides over wealth generation, not the consumption of public money. Therefore his pay needs only be justified to the shareholders.

2. The CEO of a private company WILL be better qualified / experienced. For example...

Your professional background is not important although experience in managing some of the service areas within Urban Living would be an advantage.

......is NOT something you would see in an ad for a private CEO position.

3. The performance of CEO of a private company can be easily assessed (profit / loss) and he will be sacked by the shareholders without hesitation. Council CEOs just raise council tax to pay for their f**k ups. Public services don't go bust through mis-management, companies do.

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Nearly 1 in 4 of us now work for the government.

Why?

They don't run the railways, the mines or the steel industry.

Why have the government had to employ nearly a million people more since 1997. Have they taken on lots of new responsibilities. Are private/public partnerships not a reality? Why so many more public servants?

As I have said on other threads - this government are the worst I have ever seen. Absolutely utterly and congenitally useless.

Okay the Chief Executive of a council - you need a top manager - but those other pointless jobs. We don't NEED them - they are a luxury we can't afford.

My council tax is now over 2k.

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1. A CEO of a private company presides over wealth generation, not the consumption of public money. Therefore his pay needs only be justified to the shareholders.

2. The CEO of a private company WILL be better qualified / experienced. For example...

......is NOT something you would see in an ad for a private CEO position.

3. The performance of CEO of a private company can be easily assessed (profit / loss) and he will be sacked by the shareholders without hesitation. Council CEOs just raise council tax to pay for their f**k ups. Public services don't go bust through mis-management, companies do.

OK, how do you get value for the aforementioned public money?

If the answer is to have competent management, then it has to be paid for.

If the answer is to abolish councils, how do you get service delivery? By contract, then who manages the contract negotiations and enforcement.

I work (in Australia) in an area where virtually every day I see private enterprise guzzling public money, because of an government ideology that it's always more efficient and effective.

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I agree that there is a lot of waste in some parts of the public sector but some of these jobs involve managing key front line services e.g. schools. childrens social services, care for the elderly etc. You need competent people to run these services because putting it bluntly if they f**k up then you end up with the sort of child abuse scandals that happened to Victoria Climbie etc.

Some of the things happening these days really scare me - 300 black African boys disappeared from school rolls in inner London last year and no one knows where they have gone!

How many merchant bankers in the City on £1m bonuses really have to deal with these sorts of responsibilites. We need to put this all in perspective - particularly when the Chancellor is giving massive taxbreaks to enable the very rich to buy properties at half price through SIPPs next year. That really is a poor use of money and could end up costing billions.

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Guest magnoliawalls
I agree that there is a lot of waste in some parts of the public sector but some of these jobs involve managing key front line services e.g. schools. childrens social services, care for the elderly etc. You need competent people to run these services because putting it bluntly if they f**k up then you end up with the sort of child abuse scandals that happened to Victoria Climbie etc.

Some of the things happening these days really scare me - 300 black African boys disappeared from school rolls in inner London last year and no one knows where they have gone!

The fontline services are provided by teachers, nurses, social workers etc.; who are earning a fraction of the salary of the vaguely defined, middle management jobs that Dog regularly posts here.

In the Victoria Climbie case an unfortunate junior social worker took the blame and lost her job, while the senior managers involved moved "seamlessly on to presumably better-paid jobs"

As well as their bloated salaries, job security and comparitively generous pensions these leeches enjoy power without accountability.

Edited by magnoliawalls

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Magnoliawalls

It seems Chief Executives/senior managers if the public and private sectors have more in common than we would care to admit!

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If (when) the economy tanks and people are really struggling to cope I'm sure they would be pleased to see Dog's regular postings! Only when the masses wake up will these overpaid non-jobs disappear.

I'm so tempted to copy these articles and pin them up around the streets.

:angry:

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Guest magnoliawalls
Magnoliawalls

It seems Chief Executives/senior managers if the public and private sectors have more in common than we would care to admit!

Chief Executives/senior managers in the private sector are accountable to their shareholders and if they fail they will lose their jobs.

In the public sector this does not seem to happen.

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Chief Executives/senior managers in the private sector are accountable to their shareholders and if they fail they will lose their jobs.

Or alternatively receive lucrative positions salvaging the very same companies they wrecked?

http://www.havingtheircake.com/content/07_...0Pay%20Boom.php

The story of Marconi is a tragedy which has been covered fully elsewhere but perhaps the biggest single cause of outrage was the payoff to Lord Simpson of Dunkeld, the former chief executive who took much of the blame for Marconi's collapse. Marconi said that Lord Simpson had agreed to a compromise and would receive £300,000 as compensation for "loss of office" - far below the £1 million entitlement under his one-year employment contract. However, Marconi confirmed that Lord Simpson would also receive pension entitlements under the funded unapproved retirement benefit scheme (FURBS). These were estimated at £1.2 million. The total of £1.5 million gave considerable ammunition to those complaining about 'reward for failure'. Earlier in the year Gerald Corbett received £1.3 million after his period at the helm of Railtrack. His 'failure' (at least in commercial terms - the Hatfield rail crash happened during his tenure) was nothing compared to Marconi, which involved a collapse in market value from over £30 billion to virtually nothing and the loss of over 8,000 jobs.

In an interesting postscript to the collapse of Marconi (see 2001 above), Mike Parton, its chief executive, received £5 million of a potential £22 million bonus for turning the company around and completing its financial restructuring much quicker than expected. He will receive a further £8 million if the share price recovers to over 750p within the next four years. The irony of these payments is that Parton was part of the management team that led Marconi to its collapse and it now appears that he will be much better rewarded for the (partial) restoration of the company than he would have been had it continued on an even keel.

http://www.mcgrigors.com/publications/empl...ruary_2005.html

Brendan Barber, the general secretary of the Trade Union Congress (TUC) commenting on the publication and the statement from Patricia Hewitt said, "Whilst shareholder votes have had an influence in limiting top bosses' pay, massive bonuses, huge rewards for failure and gold plated pension schemes are still safe behind the closed doors of many British boardrooms".

I would suggest your rose-tinted view of the private sector and the so-called "accountability" of those at the top of it (who can forget the collapse of Equitable Life? [the irony of that company's name is now almost unbearable]) is misguided, to say the least.

Edited by IPOD

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Guest magnoliawalls

IPOD - fair points, I still believe they are more accountable.

Perfect information and perfect competition only exists in the models of economists.

:rolleyes:

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  • 335 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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