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Landlords To Make Homes More Energy Efficient

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http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2011/jun/15/energy-bill-landlords-efficient#start-of-comments

Energy bill: landlords could be forced to refurbish energy-inefficient homes

Proposed amendment would make landlords responsible for 'greening' properties or be prevented from renting them out

Landlords will be forced to refurbish hundreds of thousands of the UK's most draughty and energy-inefficient homes or find themselves blocked from renting them out, under proposals unveiled on Tuesday.

The government has bowed to pressure from campaigners and brought forward an amendment to its energy bill, discussed by MPs yesterday, that would stop landlords from renting out homes that fell into the worst two bands of energy efficiency – F and G. The clause was missing from the original bill.

As a result, the estimated 680,000 rented homes falling into this category – about one-fifth of the total number of private rented residences – must be refurbished or taken off the market by 2018.

In addition, from 2016, private sector landlords will not be allowed to refuse "any reasonable request" to make energy efficiency improvements to their properties.

Edited by SarahBell

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...Landlords will be forced to refurbish hundreds of thousands of the UK's most draughty and energy-inefficient homes or find themselves blocked from renting them out, under proposals unveiled on Tuesday.

And who is going to pay for the work? Tenants, through increased rents.

As a result, the estimated 680,000 rented homes falling into this category – about one-fifth of the total number of private rented residences – must be refurbished or taken off the market by 2018.

7 F**k**g years! how long does it take to throw some loft insulation in? And it only applies to the lowest two bands.

In addition, from 2016, private sector landlords will not be allowed to refuse "any reasonable request" to make energy efficiency improvements to their properties.

They may not be able to refuse a reasonable request, but they still have the right to evict you for making that request.

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http://www.guardian....art-of-comments

Energy bill: landlords could be forced to refurbish energy-inefficient homes

Proposed amendment would make landlords responsible for 'greening' properties or be prevented from renting them out

Landlords will be forced to refurbish hundreds of thousands of the UK's most draughty and energy-inefficient homes or find themselves blocked from renting them out, under proposals unveiled on Tuesday.

The government has bowed to pressure from campaigners and brought forward an amendment to its energy bill, discussed by MPs yesterday, that would stop landlords from renting out homes that fell into the worst two bands of energy efficiency – F and G. The clause was missing from the original bill.

As a result, the estimated 680,000 rented homes falling into this category – about one-fifth of the total number of private rented residences – must be refurbished or taken off the market by 2018.

In addition, from 2016, private sector landlords will not be allowed to refuse "any reasonable request" to make energy efficiency improvements to their properties.

If you remember this comes with the interest free loans to landlords for efficiency improvements with repayments put on electricity and gas bills (e.g. paid for by the tenants).

Two things:

- This is aimed at helping landlords (and we know this is initiated by the government's BTLer extraordinaire)

- This is part of the overall move to legislate people into forced borrowing (as with students). Need ... more ... debt. Those many bankers in the cabinet need their bonuses and cushy jobs back when they next lose to Labour.

Edited by _w_

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Now, of course, if we had a sensible housing policy, we'd be building a large number of council houses each year, with inbuilt maximum energy efficiency (including solar hot water and PV) - might help reduce the pressure on benefits as well.

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In addition, from 2016, private sector landlords will not be allowed to refuse "any reasonable request" to make energy efficiency improvements to their properties.

I wonder what the definition of private sector is that will apply, and whether there will be exemptions for properties in which it would be illegal to make the required modifications.

I rent my flat from The National Trust, which is a registered charitable trust. In other words, it's neither public (funded principally by taxpayers) nor private (a for-profit business) sector. Furthermore, most of the residential properties it lets out, including mine, are grade 1 listed buildings in which, for example, putting in double glazing and central heating would be illegal without permission from English Heritage, and English Heritage won't give their permission. Will they simply have to stop renting out these properties? Would the tenants be allowed to sign a waiver (like the European Working Time Directive one to say that you're happy to work over 48 hours a week) and continue living in such a place? My rent is significantly below the market rate, partly to reflect the increased energy costs I have in winter. This seems fair enough to me.

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Like any tax, the costs are borne by both buyer and seller. Rents might rise a little, but probably not by enough to keep the landlord's profit margin the same.

http://en.wikipedia....Deadweight_loss

it is hard to see how rental prices will be affected by this - the supply/demand equation should largely remain the same, unless this law results in rental properties being taken off the lettings market

this could well be a tax entirely borne by landlords

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If you remember this comes with the interest free loans to landlords for efficiency improvements with repayments put on electricity and gas bills (e.g. paid for by the tenants).

How does that work? What if the tenant moves out? Does the new tenant pay over the odds for theie energy bills? Why on earth would you move into a property with guaranteed higher energy costs? What if you (as a tenant) switch energy company?

Is it something that, as a tenant, you need to be asking now - what additional tariffs are imposed on the house?

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Is it something that, as a tenant, you need to be asking now - what additional tariffs are imposed on the house?

my guess is almost none, since landlords hold little pricing power currently (outside London)

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it is hard to see how rental prices will be affected by this - the supply/demand equation should largely remain the same, unless this law results in rental properties being taken off the lettings market

this could well be a tax entirely borne by landlords

+1

This is a first step towards recalibrating the appeal of BTL as a pension.

The economy flatlines, voters demand tax cuts, government shrinks in order to deliver the tax cuts to get elected. But...government still wants to tinker, and without being able to spend they can only fiddle with legislation such as this. And then they fiddle some more. And before you know it rental is wrapped in so many legal requirements that only big players can navigate through the legislation. The small landlords exit, very unhappy because they have to face up to the fact that without their BTL dream they'll be working into their 70's like everyone else.

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How does that work? What if the tenant moves out? Does the new tenant pay over the odds for theie energy bills? Why on earth would you move into a property with guaranteed higher energy costs? What if you (as a tenant) switch energy company?

Is it something that, as a tenant, you need to be asking now - what additional tariffs are imposed on the house?

Under the Energy "New Deal" plans the loan to make the improvements sits with the home, not the homeowner - to be paid off by a added cost to future energy bills. So I believe:

What if the tenant moves out? Does the new tenant pay over the odds for their energy bills? Yes

Why on earth would you move into a property with guaranteed higher energy costs? You wouldn't. But will everyone check?

What if you (as a tenant) switch energy company? The new company also adds the supplement to your bills.

Is it something that, as a tenant, you need to be asking now - what additional tariffs are imposed on the house? Yes

Also something people buying houses will have to start asking from now on. The principle is that the loan is attached to the house, not the homeowner. Homeowner sells up - new owner takes on the debt.

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It shows how poor quality the uk housing stock is.

It has got worse since BTL infected it. Unrepaired, degrading to let stock and newbuilds of appaling quality and durability that will fall apart in just a few decades - the custoemr has been forced to accept what offered and still pay through the nose for it.

Still, provided a few short term gains for some.

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it is hard to see how rental prices will be affected by this - the supply/demand equation should largely remain the same, unless this law results in rental properties being taken off the lettings market

this could well be a tax entirely borne by landlords

Low income tenants can claim insulation grants at the moment - for landlorded properties... So they would I assume aim to get it free.

I don't think enough people at the moment pay attention to how much it costs to heat a property when they rent or buy one. I suspect as bills increase further this will change *BUT* I suspected people might stop driving their cars as much when petrol got dear but they haven't.

MSE has always got some eejit who hates the property because it's damp/cold/rotten/uninhabitable - but they won't move because they like the area....

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It shows how poor quality the uk housing stock is.

I'm not sure. A lot of that MEWed money in the naughties went into new kitchens and en-suites which drove standards up. But on the other hand amateur BTL has steadily been degrading quality.

Looking forward overall housing stock quality is only going one way, and that's down. No more MEWing makeovers, lots more struggling landlords.

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Under the Energy "New Deal" plans the loan to make the improvements sits with the home, not the homeowner - to be paid off by a added cost to future energy bills. So I believe:

What if the tenant moves out? Does the new tenant pay over the odds for their energy bills? Yes

Why on earth would you move into a property with guaranteed higher energy costs? You wouldn't. But will everyone check?

What if you (as a tenant) switch energy company? The new company also adds the supplement to your bills.

Is it something that, as a tenant, you need to be asking now - what additional tariffs are imposed on the house? Yes

Also something people buying houses will have to start asking from now on. The principle is that the loan is attached to the house, not the homeowner. Homeowner sells up - new owner takes on the debt.

How silly. So it there are two identical houses, but one has this tarriff against it, I wonder how much less the tarriffes house is going to be worth...

er... My guess would be the cost of the tarriff.

Sounds like a bizarre MEW'ing scheme for the owner to me. How can a house have a debt?

What happens if the present owner goes bankrupt? Does the new owner still have this debt?

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  • 284 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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