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swissy_fit

Dell 9300 Laptop Bios Password

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Hi all

It's not the ideal forum for this question, I know, but there are quite a few techies and as an established poster perhaps at least I won't be suspected of wanting to crack the password of a stolen PC (though who would steal a 2006 Dell Inspiron 9300 laptop I don't know).

Anyway I lent this oldish PC to someone, they claim to have done nothing to cause this which is obviously a lie, but now it refuses to boot, even setup and boot-order change isn't accessible, it's asking for the BIOS password.I have no means of knowing what this is, especially as it probably wasn't me that entered it.

Does anyone on here know how to recover or clear the password?

Google has revealed a few paysites that claim to do it if I send them the service tag and xxx dollars, anyone know of a free way of doing it?

I saw a post on another forum that Dell ask 50 dollars for this - money for old rope the thieving b*stards.

Don't want to spend much money cos it was always slow with XP, I only want it to put Ubuntu on and give to the kids, they destroy anything with Windows in 6 months so I thought I'd try Linux on them.

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That trick went out in about 2000.

These passwords are written into non-volatile flash memory. The op can either:

Purchase a new security chip and solder it in.

Use a program to hack the password which uses a back-door generator requiring the service tag.

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That trick went out in about 2000.

These passwords are written into non-volatile flash memory. The op can either:

Purchase a new security chip and solder it in.

Use a program to hack the password which uses a back-door generator requiring the service tag.

Never needed to, but can you do this/does this work?

http://www.wikihow.com/Reset-Your-BIOS

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The Bios is an addressable range within a computer, so if you can find an app or know someone who can write a few lines of c code, it might be possible to corrupt the progammable element of the bios in which case it should just default back to the base ROM.

I had a friend do this years ago on a old Pentium90 I locked myself out of.

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The Bios is an addressable range within a computer, so if you can find an app or know someone who can write a few lines of c code, it might be possible to corrupt the progammable element of the bios in which case it should just default back to the base ROM.

I had a friend do this years ago on a old Pentium90 I locked myself out of.

Check out this post http://www.syschat.com/how-to-reset-clear-cmos-laptop-418.html

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Well either way just be careful in what they used it for. I would be rather wary in lending any sort of computer to someone.

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Thanks for the replies guys.

I'm thinking I might drop into an internet café and try running those programs from the dodgy-looking sites rather than on my work PC!

I don't really fancy ripping the back off the laptop to find the coin battery.

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It's a laptop.

Accessing the small battery is likely to be tricky.

What he said. I've also known them to be soldered in.

That was a nightmare. Too cold and the solder doesn't stick. Too hot and all the good stuff oozes out of the battery and it's scrap.

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The Bios is an addressable range within a computer, so if you can find an app or know someone who can write a few lines of c code, it might be possible to corrupt the progammable element of the bios in which case it should just default back to the base ROM.

I had a friend do this years ago on a old Pentium90 I locked myself out of.

Might make sense. Years ago when I taught 'c' for a living students had a love of letting pointers rum wild and trashing the cmos. Those were the days when you had to know the sectors, heads and cylinders to set up the bios. I ended up carrying a note of the parameters for all the computers in the room.

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Hi all

It's not the ideal forum for this question, I know, but there are quite a few techies and as an established poster perhaps at least I won't be suspected of wanting to crack the password of a stolen PC (though who would steal a 2006 Dell Inspiron 9300 laptop I don't know).

Anyway I lent this oldish PC to someone, they claim to have done nothing to cause this which is obviously a lie, but now it refuses to boot, even setup and boot-order change isn't accessible, it's asking for the BIOS password.I have no means of knowing what this is, especially as it probably wasn't me that entered it.

Does anyone on here know how to recover or clear the password?

Google has revealed a few paysites that claim to do it if I send them the service tag and xxx dollars, anyone know of a free way of doing it?

I saw a post on another forum that Dell ask 50 dollars for this - money for old rope the thieving b*stards.

Don't want to spend much money cos it was always slow with XP, I only want it to put Ubuntu on and give to the kids, they destroy anything with Windows in 6 months so I thought I'd try Linux on them.

why dont you just take the laptop back to the education authority you stole it from ?

: )

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  • 312 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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