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Real Ale

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Having hit the 30s I am realising that I have got a softspot for real ale all of a sudden.

I probably had no more than 5 pints of the stuff in my 20s, now suddenly cant go back to the gas and chemicals of lager.

Is it an age thing that all blokes make the move?

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Having hit the 30s I am realising that I have got a softspot for real ale all of a sudden.

I probably had no more than 5 pints of the stuff in my 20s, now suddenly cant go back to the gas and chemicals of lager.

Is it an age thing that all blokes make the move?

I did the same. Maybe when I was just drinking to get p*ssed in my 20s the taste didn't matter so much. Although I live in Northern Ireland where real ale has only been widely available for the past few years, so that's probably more to do with it.

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Basically, yes.

Don't just become a real ale buff though - don't forget that there is a huge difference between quality lagers brewed in Europe and much of the stuff passing as lager made here in the UK.

I know some real ale buffs who rubbish all lager failing to contemplate that quality European lager is so superior to the British stuff - even well-known brands can taste very different between the UK brewed stuff and stuff brewed in Holland, Germany, Czech Republic, etc.

Apple and Pear ciders brewed with wooden presses is completely diffferent to the mass produced metal pressed stuff also.

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Basically, yes.

Don't just become a real ale buff though - don't forget that there is a huge difference between quality lagers brewed in Europe and much of the stuff passing as lager made here in the UK.

I know some real ale buffs who rubbish all lager failing to contemplate that quality European lager is so superior to the British stuff - even well-known brands can taste very different between the UK brewed stuff and stuff brewed in Holland, Germany, Czech Republic, etc.

Apple and Pear ciders brewed with wooden presses is completely diffferent to the mass produced metal pressed stuff also.

Heineken in Holland and Stella in Belgium is gorgeous hoppy refreshiong stuff - and the UK brewed versions under license are pish, indeed

also there are real ale breweries in the UK that are now brewing lager in the wood, and it is lovely stuff too. They're starting to produce non-pasturised lager and other european beers brewed in the wood in europe now too, the old way, i understand it is taking off in Germany and they took their cue from the UK authentic beer scene.

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I swapped over as a matter of "necessity"...late teens, it was lager, but after about 3 or 4 pints, I was a mess, it turned my guts into a vat of acid (much like having crap red wine)...

I moved over to Beamish, then Guinness & John Smith's. I now have these alongside Real Ales...

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I thought the standard route as your taste matured was:

Sweet cider

Dry cider

Lager top / lime

Lager

Real Ale

Then for the alcohol lovers:

Premium lager

Most people I know followed this route. Some stopped at lager, I stopped at real ale.

Occasionally I have a pint of guinness if the only bitter is some dire pasteurised keg stuff like Worthy or John Smiths. Guinness is very bland but preferable to those anyway. I've quite liked draught Murphy's when I've had it though, but you don't see it often.

Also a long term fan of perry, make a point of having that at real ale fests (though not been to one of those for a decade or more) or if I see farmhouse stuff advertised. I was initially delighted to find pear cider becoming easy to find but sadly it is not a patch on proper perry.

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Apple and Pear ciders brewed with wooden presses is completely diffferent to the mass produced metal pressed stuff also.

+1

In my early thirties I moved in the direction of a nice bottle of red but over the last year I have "discovered" that there are some awesome ciders out there.

As an indication of how sad/obsessive I am, I went to Sainsburys and bought one of every cider they sold. Set me back about £50. Then I drank my way through them keeping the bottles of the ones I liked. Invariably the more mass produced ones had a more synthetic taste. When I had finished, I bought 2 of all my favourites and had the wife set me up a blind taste test to settle on my final favourites. Now i have a lovely stock of the orange labelled sainsburys cider and the taste the difference one made by Aspalls.

By coindcidence, I live just a few miles away from Aspalls so I can drink it with extra smugness in drinking locally sourced booze (even though it is probably shipped off and around the country before it comes back to Ipswich!)

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Most of the women in our circle of friends dislike real ale because of the effect if has on their men.

? beards, beer guts, and belching?

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Basically, yes.

Don't just become a real ale buff though - don't forget that there is a huge difference between quality lagers brewed in Europe and much of the stuff passing as lager made here in the UK.

I know some real ale buffs who rubbish all lager failing to contemplate that quality European lager is so superior to the British stuff - even well-known brands can taste very different between the UK brewed stuff and stuff brewed in Holland, Germany, Czech Republic, etc.

Apple and Pear ciders brewed with wooden presses is completely diffferent to the mass produced metal pressed stuff also.

When continental beer manufacturers first started selling their wares in the UK, they had to reduce the alcohol content of their product to adapt to what the Brits were used to. They've since relented on this aspect, but for some reason have kept the manufacturing process different to that of the continent.

I'm probably the reverse, as regards the thread header. I used to drink bitters and real ales, but realised the chance of an upset stomach (on just 1 drink) was too great. It may be down to the fact that those beers need a lot more care and attention, but they're just too dangerous. So it's mainly lagers nowadays - better to drink pish water than sh1te water, I'm afraid. If I'm in the Stockwell area I sometimes pop in a Portuguese bar for a Sagres - better quality than the normal Fosters, and often cheaper too.

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+1

In my early thirties I moved in the direction of a nice bottle of red but over the last year I have "discovered" that there are some awesome ciders out there.

As an indication of how sad/obsessive I am, I went to Sainsburys and bought one of every cider they sold. Set me back about £50. Then I drank my way through them keeping the bottles of the ones I liked. Invariably the more mass produced ones had a more synthetic taste. When I had finished, I bought 2 of all my favourites and had the wife set me up a blind taste test to settle on my final favourites. Now i have a lovely stock of the orange labelled sainsburys cider and the taste the difference one made by Aspalls.

By coindcidence, I live just a few miles away from Aspalls so I can drink it with extra smugness in drinking locally sourced booze (even though it is probably shipped off and around the country before it comes back to Ipswich!)

Pub near work occasionally has barrels of Sheep Dip and Pig Swill on. Lovely stuff.

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I've drunk real ales from pretty much the start of drinking (cider didn't last long, after an early bad experience with it). I simply put up with the bad guts thing, which isn't too much of a problem when you live on your own. Sometimes I don't get it even when drinking the same barrel though, I've never quite worked it out. I have occasionally wondered if it's something malt related because I've had a similar effect from getting peckish and stuffing myself with too much malty breakfast cereal.

I've never understood the appeal in drinking the rubbish that usually gets offered as lager in this country.

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...there are some really good free pubs around, I like to go for half a beer or ale that I have never tried before, and don't mind the warm, dark, thick, bitterness of the taste especially in the winter....in the summer a good cold dry cider such a thatchers original goes down a treat. ;)

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I've drunk real ales from pretty much the start of drinking (cider didn't last long, after an early bad experience with it). I simply put up with the bad guts thing, which isn't too much of a problem when you live on your own. Sometimes I don't get it even when drinking the same barrel though, I've never quite worked it out. I have occasionally wondered if it's something malt related because I've had a similar effect from getting peckish and stuffing myself with too much malty breakfast cereal.

I've never understood the appeal in drinking the rubbish that usually gets offered as lager in this country.

I think you've already answered your question. A lot of folk would prefer not to have bad guts, especially if they're working the next day. I'm not sure that the taste is relevant for a lot of social drinkers - more a case of the banter, and sharing a drink with friends. If you're really worried about the taste you tend to be a wine, or even a whisky drinker? Having said all that, i think the Camra crowd provide a good reason for some to get together, and they've done great work in supporting local pubs and breweries over the years- which has been sorely needed.

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I find myself going tee total (only 26). I have the odd cider, red wine or whisky but that is rare - alcohol doesn't give me much gain anymore (not sure it ever did tbh).

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its a shame that I live in the middle of Cider country, and can't really touch it...Hey ho...

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I think you've already answered your question. A lot of folk would prefer not to have bad guts, especially if they're working the next day. I'm not sure that the taste is relevant for a lot of social drinkers - more a case of the banter, and sharing a drink with friends. If you're really worried about the taste you tend to be a wine, or even a whisky drinker? Having said all that, i think the Camra crowd provide a good reason for some to get together, and they've done great work in supporting local pubs and breweries over the years- which has been sorely needed.

I tend to avoid drinking at all if I'm working the next day; at most I'll have two pints, which doesn't have any next day effects. Drinking whisky all night would really wreck me! What you're drinking is as much part of what makes it worth going out for a drink as the banter, at least until you've had so much that you're not tasting it anyway (or making sense in the banter stakes, but that's OK because no-one else is listening by then).

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Most alcohol has its place.

Real ale I like, but in the winter not the summer. The switch from lager to beer season and back again, the twice yearly event.

Real ale has a lot more variety in taste, but a crisp cold lager is great on a hot day.

Wine with the meal, champagne to celebrate. Port is great with a nice bit of strong cheese. I don't really do spirits.

Despite the above still come well under 20 units a week. For me alcohol is now about quality and not quantity. Enjoying small amounts of quality booze when the time is right, not throwing the stuff down my neck at every opportunity.

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...there are some really good free pubs around, I like to go for half a beer or ale that I have never tried before, and don't mind the warm, dark, thick, bitterness of the taste especially in the winter....in the summer a good cold dry cider such a thatchers original goes down a treat. ;)

Is this the good end of Socialism? :huh:

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Most alcohol has its place.

Real ale I like, but in the winter not the summer. The switch from lager to beer season and back again, the twice yearly event.

Real ale has a lot more variety in taste, but a crisp cold lager is great on a hot day.

Wine with the meal, champagne to celebrate. Port is great with a nice bit of strong cheese. I don't really do spirits.

Despite the above still come well under 20 units a week. For me alcohol is now about quality and not quantity. Enjoying small amounts of quality booze when the time is right, not throwing the stuff down my neck at every opportunity.

A nice hoppy IPA on a hot day, surely?

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  • 312 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
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      • Even
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      • up 5%



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