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Ireland - One-In-10 Drivers Refusing To Pay For Motor Tax

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http://www.independent.ie/national-news/onein10-drivers-refusing-to-pay-for-motor-tax-2667077.html

CASH-strapped motorists who refuse to tax their vehicles are costing the taxpayer more than €1.5m a week.

As many as one-in-10 motorists are driving cars, trucks and motorcycles without taxing them. New figures from the Department of the Environment show the Exchequer has lost €94m over a 15-month period.

Officials believe many of the drivers are abusing the so-called 'off-the-road' loophole, where people don't tax their car for a short period of time -- usually up to a month -- because they don't plan to use it in a public place.

To avail of the scheme, they must sign a declaration witnessed by a garda which states that the vehicle has not been used. When they go to tax the car, they are not obliged to pay tax for this period.

But Environment Minister Phil Hogan suggested the scheme is being abused.

"I am very concerned at the high level of off-the-road declarations being made, and I am aware that current procedures governing the making of such declarations may be open to potential abuse," he said.

Shocking I mean who would have thought this would have happened. Amazing if the bankers avoid paying tax they given more freedom to "make" more money and avoid tax and yet when the people do it they are evil.

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Do they have the right to seize vehicles over there?

They should do that and impose massive fines all round.

Either fine the buggers into submission or take the cars off the road altogether thus saving wear and tear on the tarmac.

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Do they have the right to seize vehicles over there?

According to the story, data from automatic roadside cameras cannot be used for prosecution. The only way an untaxed driver can be 'done' is if (s)he's pulled over by the bogies, asked to produce a tax disc and fails to do so.

So, it would seem that Greece is not the only country in which the population have responded to austerity measures with widespread tax evasion. They've started with the easiest tax to evade, but no doubt they'll move on to others if and when this loophole is closed.

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In "Big Brother" Britain it is no longer possible to deal with motor tax a la Del Boy (Tax in the post). Pity there was not some sort of fraud meter for the banksters and government.

0845 telephone numbers to call a government department to "help" you. Helping themselves to your pocket more like.

Fraud is so widespread in this country that it is hard to see how it can be dealt with. Serious theft now legalised (BanksterisM) so they have to make up for it by hitting small time theft or fraud (non-payment of road tax).

Edited by Realistbear

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If the Irish don't pay their taxes then the IMF will move in and ensure that tax collection is off shored and they will loose sovereignty. This is what is happening in Greece, in addition to national assets being sold off.

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Do they pay road tax in southern Ireland? I can imagine most of the cars in northern Ireland having southern Ireland plates if they don't.

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Do they have the right to seize vehicles over there?

They should do that and impose massive fines all round.

Either fine the buggers into submission or take the cars off the road altogether thus saving wear and tear on the tarmac.

Why not throw them into prison for daring to keep their own money.

Isn't this an indication that the population cannot afford to have so much taken from them in tax?

Tax is the price for a civilized society, no one can seriously disagree with that, even the Bible says a tithe should be paid. The difference is a tithe was 10%, overall we pay almost half of our income in tax now and some pay even more.

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Do they have the right to seize vehicles over there?

They should do that and impose massive fines all round.

Either fine the buggers into submission or take the cars off the road altogether thus saving wear and tear on the tarmac.

And if they refuse to co operate shoot them, I suppose?

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I did some research into car tax in Ireland a few years ago when I noticed a big jump in the number of classic cars being bought up and shipped to the Emerald Isle. The major incentive is that any car registered before 1/1/80 doesn't have to have the annual NCT (MoT equivalent):

As far as car tax dodging goes, it's not suprising really when a car registered before 2008 with an engine size over 3 litres is €1566 a year. Even a 2 litre car is €614 per year!

http://www.irishlinks.co.uk/car-tax-ireland.htm

A car that is over 30 years old, however, attracts only a €50 admin import fee and €48 a year car tax:

http://www.classiccarsireland.eu/the_benefits.asp

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As far as car tax dodging goes, it's not suprising really when a car registered before 2008 with an engine size over 3 litres is €1566 a year. Even a 2 litre car is €614 per year!

I'm not going to Ireland! That really is expensive! :blink:

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I did some research into car tax in Ireland a few years ago when I noticed a big jump in the number of classic cars being bought up and shipped to the Emerald Isle. The major incentive is that any car registered before 1/1/80 doesn't have to have the annual NCT (MoT equivalent):

As far as car tax dodging goes, it's not suprising really when a car registered before 2008 with an engine size over 3 litres is €1566 a year. Even a 2 litre car is €614 per year!

http://www.irishlinks.co.uk/car-tax-ireland.htm

A car that is over 30 years old, however, attracts only a €50 admin import fee and €48 a year car tax:

http://www.classiccarsireland.eu/the_benefits.asp

Paying loads for a 3l car? Sounds good to me.

But then I'm a firm believer in the tax burden falling on assets rather than income :)

On the other hand, I notice that small cars still pay road tax - that's bad, that tax burden should be moved to petrol. As it is, a granny who uses her car once a week to visit her daughter is paying as much tax as someone who commutes 100 miles a day. Not logical.

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And if they refuse to co operate shoot them, I suppose?

and charge the estate with the costs of execution.

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Do they have the right to seize vehicles over there?

They should do that and impose massive fines all round.

Either fine the buggers into submission or take the cars off the road altogether thus saving wear and tear on the tarmac.

sieze a vehicle worth £0000s, for a pidly tax?

fines for people who cant pay?

the Proles have the power...they are starting to exercise it.

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Paying loads for a 3l car? Sounds good to me.

But then I'm a firm believer in the tax burden falling on assets rather than income :)

On the other hand, I notice that small cars still pay road tax - that's bad, that tax burden should be moved to petrol. As it is, a granny who uses her car once a week to visit her daughter is paying as much tax as someone who commutes 100 miles a day. Not logical.

I think that many new taxes started out with logical underpinnings.

I think that we all know that they morph into a means by which the state can extract as much as possible from the productive efforts of individuals to increase the political class's grip on power.

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Guest eight

Either fine the buggers into submission or take the cars off the road altogether thus saving wear and tear on the tarmac.

On the plus side, if anybody can re-lay tarmac.....

eight

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I did some research into car tax in Ireland a few years ago when I noticed a big jump in the number of classic cars being bought up and shipped to the Emerald Isle. The major incentive is that any car registered before 1/1/80 doesn't have to have the annual NCT (MoT equivalent):

As far as car tax dodging goes, it's not suprising really when a car registered before 2008 with an engine size over 3 litres is €1566 a year. Even a 2 litre car is €614 per year!

http://www.irishlinks.co.uk/car-tax-ireland.htm

A car that is over 30 years old, however, attracts only a €50 admin import fee and €48 a year car tax:

http://www.classiccarsireland.eu/the_benefits.asp

:lol::lol:

And there was me getting all worked up about the £155 a year I have to pay.

I do find it slightly irritating that I have to pay road tax even if I haven't used the car for two weeks. If I only had to pay for the day's I use it. It would only cost me £30 a year.

If they did road tax by the day it would encourage more people to walk or cycle.

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On the other hand, I notice that small cars still pay road tax - that's bad, that tax burden should be moved to petrol.

Probably should be moved to the fuel! But it makes so much sense I can't see it happening! :(:o

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Probably should be moved to the fuel! But it makes so much sense I can't see it happening! :(:o

I struggle to think of a good reason why it shouldn't be moved to fuel. The only advantage that I can think of with a direct tax is to include third party insurance in it, such as is done in some countries.

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Maybe given the high cost of taxing the vehicles there, they're parking them up on their own land and waiting for the green shoots? Perfectly legal, but given the State's need for cash, unacceptable to the PTB.

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I struggle to think of a good reason why it shouldn't be moved to fuel. The only advantage that I can think of with a direct tax is to include third party insurance in it, such as is done in some countries.

Yes that does not happen here! It could be argued that the tax disc is a way of getting the motorist to pay for checking the insurance once a year! But it's all on line anyway now! If you are not insured, the following plod know in seconds! :blink:

So that aguement is not longer valid!

The tax disc is there, because it has always been there, and I guess it employs hundreds. :(

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Probably should be moved to the fuel! But it makes so much sense I can't see it happening! :(:o

Contradicting my last post. the problem with no road tax is that some people would have loads of cars parked on the street and only one that they use. That transit van that needs a bit of welding and that Escort cabriolet nice in the summer when I get round to fixing the head gasket.

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Paying loads for a 3l car? Sounds good to me.

But then I'm a firm believer in the tax burden falling on assets rather than income :)

On the other hand, I notice that small cars still pay road tax - that's bad, that tax burden should be moved to petrol. As it is, a granny who uses her car once a week to visit her daughter is paying as much tax as someone who commutes 100 miles a day. Not logical.

Taxation is not logical. Its just a way of keeping are armies of bureaucrats, civil servants and banksters very well fed.

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I struggle to think of a good reason why it shouldn't be moved to fuel. The only advantage that I can think of with a direct tax is to include third party insurance in it, such as is done in some countries.

Just imagine the claims that would generate.....

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Contradicting my last post. the problem with no road tax is that some people would have loads of cars parked on the street and only one that they use. That transit van that needs a bit of welding and that Escort cabriolet nice in the summer when I get round to fixing the head gasket.

They would still need insurance if on a public highway, and that is my point! :huh:

Plod can check this easily!

If on your own land, and unused, well that's your choice! :blink:

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