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Car Key Snapped!

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My car key snapped in half, luckily it's not in the barrel and I have both halves. I don't have a spare as the car was bought second-hand from a dealer. It's still within the warranty period but the guy told just told me this didn't cover the key (surprise!). Does that sound right?

Do I need to contact the manufacturer and how much is it going to cost me? Cheapest option anyone?

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My car key snapped in half, luckily it's not in the barrel and I have both halves. I don't have a spare as the car was bought second-hand from a dealer. It's still within the warranty period but the guy told just told me this didn't cover the key (surprise!). Does that sound right?

Do I need to contact the manufacturer and how much is it going to cost me? Cheapest option anyone?

What type of car is it?

If it is a Mark 3 Escort or something of vintage, a normal key cutter can probably make the key, but if it has an immobiliser and other features then you'll need a key from a dealer.

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Even on a new car you may well find that the key blade itself is nothing special and can be cut anywhere.

You then dismantle the plastic top of the old key, remove the broken blade and fit the new blade to the plastic part, leaving the immobiliser chip and remote locking gubbins intact. Far cheaper than getting a complete new key, chip and remote from a dealer.

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Find a piece of metal almost exactly the same size as the original key, then whittle it into shape using micro files.

That will take about three days, but pretty low cost.

I know a guy who stuck two halves of key together with superglue (possible if you know how to use it properly). Needless to say rather than use this method to buy him some time until he got a new key he continued to use it and eventually it fell apart inside the lock.

Edit : BTW it's unusual to have a car with only one key. Check what the warranty doc says.

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Even on a new car you may well find that the key blade itself is nothing special and can be cut anywhere.

You then dismantle the plastic top of the old key, remove the broken blade and fit the new blade to the plastic part, leaving the immobiliser chip and remote locking gubbins intact. Far cheaper than getting a complete new key, chip and remote from a dealer.

I've phoned a few places they all say they need to see it, so I'll have to go out tomorrow (on the bus) and hopefully they can do what you have suggested, I didn't realise they were so valuable. I'm hoping I can do it your way. I think I'd be looking at £30?

edit: thought about superglue but I don't want it comming off in the barrel, I reckon I'd be in a world of pain.

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Find a piece of metal almost exactly the same size as the original key, then whittle it into shape using micro files.

That will take about three days, but pretty low cost.

:blink:

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My car key snapped in half, luckily it's not in the barrel and I have both halves. I don't have a spare as the car was bought second-hand from a dealer. It's still within the warranty period but the guy told just told me this didn't cover the key (surprise!). Does that sound right?

Do I need to contact the manufacturer and how much is it going to cost me? Cheapest option anyone?

A quick google should help, eg:

http://www.theautolocksmith.co.uk/replacement-car-keys.html

I've not used this company - they are just an example. I'd call whoever is in your area. I know some keys can be replaced without the original as the locksmith can get the details from the manufacturer. All depends on car, age and what type of key you have.

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What type of car is it?

If it is a Mark 3 Escort or something of vintage, a normal key cutter can probably make the key, but if it has an immobiliser and other features then you'll need a key from a dealer.

With remote locking keys on the mk4 fiesta (plus other fords of same age), you could separate the the immobiliser/remote locking bit from the actual key, and pay £3 to have a new key bit made up. You could also re-program any immobiliser/remote to another, as long as you had the red key - the procedure was in the owners manual. People would still happly pay Fords £50+ to do this though! :o

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This happened with my first car. I used to drive to the beach and go swimming in the ocean after a few kms running up and down the strand. Key was tied to my trunks -- corrosion in salt water -- snap!

The day it happened I had to drive home 60 miles in the brother's car to pick up the spare.

I have three keys for the current car. My sympathies.

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Happened to me , I superglued it together in order to get a cheap copy cut , I then removed the immobiliser 'chip' from the old key , took the bottom off the steering column and taped the 'chip' near to where the key goes and naturally , clipped the steering column back

You've probably spotted the flaw in that the car effectively now didn't have an immobiliser but any potential thief would assume it did have and act accordingly anyway

Not recommended if your car is flash and worth some serious coin, otherwise........what's the worst that can happen........

Alternatively you could embed the 'chip' into a suitable keyring and attach your new car key to that which would be both cheap and keep the immobiliser working ....... probably the better option thinking about it now , why didn't I think of that then for myself!?

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I would glue it together with superglue and take it to the key cutters.

I think the issue is more of what about the immobiliser chip in the old key

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I think you're going to have to replace the car.

:D

This looks like a good replacement IMHO, and it's electric and a hard-top convertible:

fisker-karma-s-convertible-221.jpg

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With remote locking keys on the mk4 fiesta (plus other fords of same age), you could separate the the immobiliser/remote locking bit from the actual key, and pay £3 to have a new key bit made up. You could also re-program any immobiliser/remote to another, as long as you had the red key - the procedure was in the owners manual. People would still happly pay Fords £50+ to do this though! :o

Really depends on what sort of car it is, as mentioned above the older Fords had a red key which "enabled" any new key. My old Freelander there was a a process of turning the ignition on and off in a certain sequence to match new keys. Have a look in your handbook, if such a method exists you might get away with just buying a new key.

Personally the first thing I do when I buy a new car is make sure I have 1 master key I never use and then 2 other spares.

Is there a tab on the key with a serial number, most manufacturers only need that serial number.

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Does that sound right?

Do I need to contact the manufacturer and how much is it going to cost me? Cheapest option anyone?

I wouldn't expect it to be covered in a warranty, it's not something mechanical so any damage would be likely to be the result of misuse (not by you but maybe weakened by the previous owner)

Cost really depends on what it is, I think the Ford replacement was less than £10 but I have been quoted £50+ for a Mitsubishi replacement.

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I wouldn't expect it to be covered in a warranty, it's not something mechanical so any damage would be likely to be the result of misuse (not by you but maybe weakened by the previous owner)

Cost really depends on what it is, I think the Ford replacement was less than £10 but I have been quoted £50+ for a Mitsubishi replacement.

I don't think it is. The official replacement cost varied from £50-£150 depending who you asked. Anyway it's fixed now.

For the record and if anyone else has this issue (snapped key rather than lost key), mine (and I think several models, as mentioned above by Joe) came in two sections: a remote fob and the other section was the key part itself which was snapped. Use a screwdriver to seperate the two. The part that contained the [snapped] key section also had a transponder in it. If this is glued in or soldered in you're a bit screwed mine wasn't, it was in a plastic rail and came out.

The auto-locksmith (normal locksmith wasn't able to replace, but put me in touch with auto-locksmith) just replaced the key section using the key number that I gave him (found with the documentation that came with the car), this gave him my key section shape. I then slid the transponder from snapped key section into new key section and snapped it back into the remote section of the fob. It cost me £20.

Moral: Don't use your precious, brittle car-key as a leverage tool because you're too lazy to walk 15 yards to the tool drawer.

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  • 312 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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