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Obama's Speech To Parliament

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Obama's speech to Parliament

Quoted below the part about the economy.

(...) the international order has already been reshaped for a new century. Countries like China, India, and Brazil are growing by leaps and bounds. We should welcome this development, for it has lifted hundreds of millions from poverty around the globe, and created new markets and opportunities for our own nations.

And yet, as this rapid change has taken place, it’s become fashionable in some quarters to question whether the rise of these nations will accompany the decline of American and European influence around the world. Perhaps, the argument goes, these nations represent the future, and the time for our leadership has passed.

That argument is wrong. The time for our leadership is now. It was the United States and the United Kingdom and our democratic allies that shaped a world in which new nations could emerge and individuals could thrive. And even as more nations take on the responsibilities of global leadership, our alliance will remain indispensable to the goal of a century that is more peaceful, more prosperous and more just.

At a time when threats and challenges require nations to work in concert with one another, we remain the greatest catalysts for global action. In an era defined by the rapid flow of commerce and information, it is our free market tradition, our openness, fortified by our commitment to basic security for our citizens, that offers the best chance of prosperity that is both strong and shared. As millions are still denied their basic human rights because of who they are, or what they believe, or the kind of government that they live under, we are the nations most willing to stand up for the values of tolerance and self-determination that lead to peace and dignity.

Now, this doesn’t mean we can afford to stand still. The nature of our leadership will need to change with the times. As I said the first time I came to London as President, for the G20 summit, the days are gone when Roosevelt and Churchill could sit in a room and solve the world’s problems over a glass of brandy -– although I’m sure that Prime Minister Cameron would agree that some days we could both use a stiff drink. (Laughter.) In this century, our joint leadership will require building new partnerships, adapting to new circumstances, and remaking ourselves to meet the demands of a new era.

That begins with our economic leadership.

Adam Smith’s central insight remains true today: There is no greater generator of wealth and innovation than a system of free enterprise that unleashes the full potential of individual men and women. That’s what led to the Industrial Revolution that began in the factories of Manchester. That is what led to the dawn of the Information Age that arose from the office parks of Silicon Valley. That’s why countries like China, India and Brazil are growing so rapidly -- because in fits and starts, they are moving toward market-based principles that the United States and the United Kingdom have always embraced.

In other words, we live in a global economy that is largely of our own making. And today, the competition for the best jobs and industries favors countries that are free-thinking and forward-looking; countries with the most creative and innovative and entrepreneurial citizens.

That gives nations like the United States and the United Kingdom an inherent advantage. For from Newton and Darwin to Edison and Einstein, from Alan Turing to Steve Jobs, we have led the world in our commitment to science and cutting-edge research, the discovery of new medicines and technologies. We educate our citizens and train our workers in the best colleges and universities on Earth. But to maintain this advantage in a world that’s more competitive than ever, we will have to redouble our investments in science and engineering, and renew our national commitments to educating our workforces.

We’ve also been reminded in the last few years that markets can sometimes fail. In the last century, both our nations put in place regulatory frameworks to deal with such market failures -- safeguards to protect the banking system after the Great Depression, for example; regulations that were established to prevent the pollution of our air and water during the 1970s.

But in today’s economy, such threats of market failure can no longer be contained within the borders of any one country. Market failures can go global, and go viral, and demand international responses.

A financial crisis that began on Wall Street infected nearly every continent, which is why we must keep working through forums like the G20 to put in place global rules of the road to prevent future excesses and abuse. No country can hide from the dangers of carbon pollution, which is why we must build on what was achieved at Copenhagen and Cancun to leave our children a planet that is safer and cleaner.

Moreover, even when the free market works as it should, both our countries recognize that no matter how responsibly we live in our lives, hard times or bad luck, a crippling illness or a layoff may strike any one of us. And so part of our common tradition has expressed itself in a conviction that every citizen deserves a basic measure of security -– health care if you get sick, unemployment insurance if you lose your job, a dignified retirement after a lifetime of hard work. That commitment to our citizens has also been the reason for our leadership in the world.

And now, having come through a terrible recession, our challenge is to meet these obligations while ensuring that we’re not consuming -- and hence consumed with -- a level of debt that could sap the strength and vitality of our economies. And that will require difficult choices and it will require different paths for both of our countries. But we have faced such challenges before, and have always been able to balance the need for fiscal responsibility with the responsibilities we have to one another.

And I believe we can do this again. As we do, the successes and failures of our own past can serve as an example for emerging economies -– that it’s possible to grow without polluting; that lasting prosperity comes not from what a nation consumes, but from what it produces, and from the investments it makes in its people and its infrastructure.

(...)

Exactly! The only way forward is better education and infrastructure! Housing included!

Source and full text: http://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2011/05/25/remarks-president-parliament-london-united-kingdom

Edited by Tired of Waiting

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Free markets :lol:

What a right load of cobblers.

Good to see him mentioning Manchester though, even if it was also contextually a load of bobbins.

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That was not "waffle" Dorkins. That was enlightened political-economy, the one that made America.

We should learn, or pay the price.

Tony Blair loved this kind of thing.

Passionate profession of hope and belief in some vague and undefined future improvement: "I believe we can..." "It's possible to"

Hints that it won't all be easy but if we work hard and have faith in ourselves we will get there (er, where?): "We face difficult choices" etc

Lists of things everybody likes the sound of: democracy, free speech, free enterprise (with appropriate safeguards of course), education, healthcare

Mentions of popular and uncontroversial historical figures and events (Churchill, Mandela).

Smattering of buzzwords: global, viral

What's missing? Oh I don't know, maybe some kind of genuine analysis of the problems our countries face and some concrete proposals for how to deal with them.

Politics is about picking winners and losers, but modern politicians love to pretend that we are all in it together. That's because they are pursuing policies that benefit the wealthiest 1% while harming everybody else.

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That was not "waffle" Dorkins. That was enlightened political-economy, the one that made America.

If only Puppet Boy meant what he said.

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If only Puppet Boy meant what he said.

was it on autocue?

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Why would better education and infrastructure improve the outlook?

Really?!

Ok then, a short summary: Generally, It would improve our quality of life. Economically, It would increase our productivity and reduce our costs.

For instance, see my sig., below, and think of Germany in that respect - very cheap properties there, about 50% cheaper than here, and their houses are also better and bigger.

Edited by Tired of Waiting

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Tony Blair loved this kind of thing.

Blair was right. Brown fecked it all up, allowing the credit bubble.

(...) What's missing? Oh I don't know, maybe some kind of genuine analysis of the problems our countries face and some concrete proposals for how to deal with them. (...)

He said it: education and infrastructure, instead of protectionisms.

A global turn into mutual protectionism would be disastrous for all.

Edited by Tired of Waiting

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snip

A global turn into mutual protectionism would be disastrous for all.

why?

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Tony Blair loved this kind of thing.

Passionate profession of hope and belief in some vague and undefined future improvement: "I believe we can..." "It's possible to"

Hints that it won't all be easy but if we work hard and have faith in ourselves we will get there (er, where?): "We face difficult choices" etc

Lists of things everybody likes the sound of: democracy, free speech, free enterprise (with appropriate safeguards of course), education, healthcare

Mentions of popular and uncontroversial historical figures and events (Churchill, Mandela).

Smattering of buzzwords: global, viral

What's missing? Oh I don't know, maybe some kind of genuine analysis of the problems our countries face and some concrete proposals for how to deal with them.

Politics is about picking winners and losers, but modern politicians love to pretend that we are all in it together. That's because they are pursuing policies that benefit the wealthiest 1% while harming everybody else.

+1

More of the same old corporatist propaganda. Feed the public this crap and they'll believe that the emperor has got clothes on. Politician have to suck on the teat of that 1% that's why I can see there being further state censorship of the net leading to it becoming a worthless source of information.

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What's missing? Oh I don't know, maybe some kind of genuine analysis of the problems our countries face and some concrete proposals for how to deal with them.

As much as I like the speeches ideals I have to agree with Dorkins. It's basically a well written pep talk.

Education and infrastructure are vital, but in order for those to be adequately put in place we need to balance the finances of the government and the balances of individual citizens. Until that happens we remain in a very precarious position. Everyone here has identified one of the main obstacles for citizens keeping in the black and leading a stable life; the high cost of property and it's trickle down effects on other parts of life and the economy. I don't hear any such clearly defined goals from our governments. So they can continue to wax lyrical about enterprise and being progressive, but until I hear a few speeches with real policy detail in them I will remain skeptical.

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That begins with our economic leadership.

LOL!!!

Leadership into what? The third world? They are clutching at straws now, with ever increasing desperation. The Anglo-American banking cartel is going to be pushed over the precipice fairly shortly.

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why?

David Ricardo: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Ricardo

The basic idea is that countries are better at different things. (It is expensive to produce bananas here, or pears in Africa.)

It is much more efficient to allow specialisation and trade.

If we isolate ourselves, we'll fall behind.

The best way to stay competitive is via education and infrastructure. Germany does that. (See my sig., below.)

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He said it: education and infrastructure, instead of protectionisms.

A global turn into mutual protectionism would be disastrous for all.

With the true cost of energy spiralling how are we going to be able to afford the cost of sending things halfway across the world.

I'm not an eco-warrior, just that I can accept that the world is in fact a big place and believe that we should respect it.

The argument for globalisation is based on assumptions that are out of date.

Edited by Blod

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He said it: education and infrastructure, instead of protectionisms.

That's pretty vague though, right? Of course education can be a good thing, but so is arsenic if you take a small enough dose. Are not enough people going to university? Are they studying the wrong things? What's his idea? Same for "infrastructure". What's he claiming we need? More motorways? More power plants? Which types? Where? Instead of what?

Until he frames his proposals precisely, there is no way to have a legitimate debate about them. It's pretty clever politics: make everything you say so vague that it is impossible to oppose. All three of the main UK political parties play this game now. What's the point in voting, when you don't know what you're voting for?

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Given that the education system in this country (with the exception of the top public Schools and some of the red brick Universities) is a complete joke, I fail to see how we can be competitive on 'education'.

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As much as I like the speeches ideals I have to agree with Dorkins. It's basically a well written pep talk.

Education and infrastructure are vital, but in order for those to be adequately put in place we need to balance the finances of the government and the balances of individual citizens. Until that happens we remain in a very precarious position. Everyone here has identified one of the main obstacles for citizens keeping in the black and leading a stable life; the high cost of property and it's trickle down effects on other parts of life and the economy. I don't hear any such clearly defined goals from our governments. So they can continue to wax lyrical about enterprise and being progressive, but until I hear a few speeches with real policy detail in them I will remain skeptical.

But housing is infrastructure, probably the most important part of a country's infrastructure.

And directly related to a country's international competitiveness. (See my sig., below.)

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With the true cost of energy spiralling how are we going to be able to afford the cost of sending things halfway across the world.

I'm not an eco-warrior, just that I can accept that the world is in fact a big place and believe that we should respect it.

The argument for globalisation is based on assumptions that are out of date.

A parcel uses more fuel between the UK warehouse and your door, than when it comes from China to Britain in a container ship.

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That's pretty vague though, right? Of course education can be a good thing, but so is arsenic if you take a small enough dose. Are not enough people going to university? Are they studying the wrong things? What's his idea? Same for "infrastructure". What's he claiming we need? More motorways? More power plants? Which types? Where? Instead of what?

Until he frames his proposals precisely, there is no way to have a legitimate debate about them. It's pretty clever politics: make everything you say so vague that it is impossible to oppose. All three of the main UK political parties play this game now. What's the point in voting, when you don't know what you're voting for?

In our case I would say our weakest points are:

Re. infrastructure: housing first and foremost; then transport. Perhaps energy, but I haven't followed the news about that, so I don't know.

Re. education I think we need to improve basic and technical education.

AND remove the perverse incentives for teenagers, such as: "Get pregnant and we'll put you on top of the council house list".

Edited by Tired of Waiting

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Given that the education system in this country (with the exception of the top public Schools and some of the red brick Universities) is a complete joke, I fail to see how we can be competitive on 'education'.

Exactly. Either we improve it, or we wll be fecked.

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Exactly. Either we improve it, or we wll be fecked.

And the chances of it being improved under the current two party system (where both parties are the same) are essentially nil. Indeed, it is steadily getting worse.

Edited by Errol

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What a right load of cobblers.

Good to see him mentioning Manchester though, even if it was also contextually a load of bobbins.

Arrr yes, bobbins. Now there's a product of the industrial revolution where (Greater) Manchester still leads the World...

Cocoon Bobbins by Danfield - The Home of the Perfect Bobbin:

http://www.danfield.co.uk/

...Danfield Limited is able to utilise the skills and abilities of a quality workforce to maintain a position as the best bobbin producer in the world. Only through careful matching of raw materials, machinery and human resources can bobbins be manufactured consistently at the high quality level to which Danfield Limited has become synonymous.

Our bobbins are created through "pride in perfection", the high standard of our people committed to achieving the best bobbin – we are proud of our achievement.

This ability to provide the "full product service" makes Danfield Limited the world's only truly specialist provider of bobbins. We are here for you.

Edited by CrashConnoisseur

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  • 312 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
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      • Even
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      • up 5%



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