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Fire Engine Off The Roads - South Yorkshire Fire Brigade

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http://www.thestar.co.uk/news/local/fire_engine_off_the_roads_1_3416509

A CONTROVERSIAL fire engine which cost £175,000 more than expected because it was too heavy for South Yorkshire’s roads has been withdrawn from service again - just a month after it was deemed safe to use.

The Combined Aerial Ladder Platform was used for the first time on April 1 - five years after the order was first placed - after emergency modifications were carried out on it and another three identical appliances bought by South Yorkshire Fire and Rescue.

But now one of the appliances has been withdrawn from service because of ‘technical problems’.

The engines should have cost £2 million but when tests revealed they were too heavy. fire bosses had to spend an extra £700,000 fixing the problem because the manufacturer had gone into administration when the fault was discovered.

......

A fire service spokesman said: “There have been some small teething problems. As a precaution the Barnsley CARP was taken off the run so minor repairs could be made to the generator and pump.

......

The appliances avoid the need for a fire engine and a separate aerial ladder platform - eventually saving around £1.25 million a year by freeing up the need for 36 firefighter posts.

Still at least it's only taxpayers money being wasted here. Good to see they tested before buying, still I bet it looked good in the sale brochure.

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The appliances avoid the need for a fire engine and a separate aerial ladder platform - eventually saving around £1.25 million a year by freeing up the need for 36 firefighter posts.

I am really surprised that such cost-efficient technology gets so much criticism. It's almost as if the people using it are not that keen on having their work simplified.

I don't know the background and have no idea if the new fire engines were fit for purpose before the fixes or are fit for purpose now. However, I expect it is a straightforward engineering problem to combine a fire engine with a ladder, so I would bet that it is an extremely cost-efficient thing to do assuming they really need 36 people as an alternative to a few million worth of machinery that will probably last a decade. Of course, it might be even more efficient just to notice a separate truck does not need that many people to operate it, and retain just the drivers if everything else seems as if it can be done by the crew of the fire engine. Anyway, if the numbers in the article are anywhere close to reality, the taxpayer will be better off even if the new platform is ridiculously overpriced - simply because the current way of doing things is more wasteful still.

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Its not incompetence it is sheer corruption. Which is apt since the UK is like 1980s China these days brown envelopes are a prequisite for anything to happen.

Obviously the buyer was given a brown envelope to choose this product over other products.

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The fire service has been reluctant to discuss the engines in detail and has refused to name their supplier or manufacturer, claiming it was ‘commercially sensitive’.

I wonder who makes them? I had a quick flick through google but couldnt find anything.

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I wonder who makes them? I had a quick flick through google but couldnt find anything.

they went bust.

Why the need for confidentiality?

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I am really surprised that such cost-efficient technology gets so much criticism.

Did you miss the bit that said "too heavy and it was feared it could topple over at speeds of more than 15mph"?

Not very cost efficient if your house burns down while the appliance trundles its way very slowly towards you. Or it falls over.

Pah, £175k?

In Cambridgeshire a fire engine costs £655k, apparently.

£175,000 more than expected. The original price was £2 million, presumably for 4 units, so £500k an appliance.

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  • 276 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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