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Lepista

Without Taxes Or Housing Costs....

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What do you think you would want to live on to be comfortable have the same lifestyle that you have now?

edited to slightly rephrase the question

Edited by Lepista

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With an income of, say, £30k, your take home pay is around £20k (say).

Housing costs lets say are £7.5k p.a.

Petrol costs of £3,000 - of which £1,500 (say) are twax and VAT;

Consumables of say £5k, of which (say) £2k are tax and VAT;

That means that of the £40k your employer sets aside for employing you, the amount you actually 'spend' on 'stuff' is closer to £9k.

£31k is going on giving others a better life.

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That means that of the £40k your employer sets aside for employing you, the amount you actually 'spend' on 'stuff' is closer to £9k.

£31k is going on giving others a better life.

Dont forget that the money that your employer is making out of you will be 50-70k minimum (otherwise it would not be his worthwhile taking the risk of taking you on), and you are down to 9k out of 60k. So out of every week, you dont even get one day where you are working for yourself!

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With an income of, say, £30k, your take home pay is around £20k (say).

Housing costs lets say are £7.5k p.a.

Petrol costs of £3,000 - of which £1,500 (say) are twax and VAT;

Consumables of say £5k, of which (say) £2k are tax and VAT;

That means that of the £40k your employer sets aside for employing you, the amount you actually 'spend' on 'stuff' is closer to £9k.

£31k is going on giving others a better life.

Oops - forgot another biggie - Council tax. That's another £1k up the swanny.

Only £8k is yours to keep now!

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Its a stupid question because they will keep screwing us for higher taxes to keep these council, politicians, bankers, idiots in the life they've become accustomed too and we can't do anything because the media is controlled by champagne socialists. If there was an even bigger disparity between public and private incomes the bbc would still cover it up as being nonsense. Their threatening strikes now, these are the kind of people that only care about number 1 putting their needs above those that they are supposed to serve.

My council tax is more than 2k a month regardless of employment, to me that is just nonsense because they don't provide anywhere near the level of service worthy of that amount - it's more like a £100 value for £2,000 a month.

Edited by scrappycocco

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What do you think you would want to live on to be comfortable have the same lifestyle that you have now?

edited to slightly rephrase the question

Excluding rent and council tax I spend about £1500 a month, so let's say 20K, and I'm very happy with my lifestyle - I have plenty to spend on eating out, holidays, booze, entertainment, hobbies, gas and leccy for the house etc.

If I treat the profit that my employer makes from me (I can roughly calculate this by dividing total profits by total number of emplyees) as a 'tax', and also the rent that is paid for the building I work in (again calculated per employee) as a tax, and the rent that I pay on my home as a tax and then take account of how VAT reduces my purchasing power and so-on after I've paid income tax and national insurance, I reckon I actually finally get to spend and enjoy something like 20% of my total economic output. Every 5 hours I work I get one hour's worth of my output to enjoy, the state gets 2 hours, my employer gets 1 hour and my landlord (and office landlord) get about 1 hour. Obviously from my landlords I receive some services from them (building maintainance etc., plus I make a contribution to the construction cost of the building) but the value of that is a small fraction of what I'm actaully paying. My employer reinvests some of the profits in the business and they took risks in setting up the business so I don't begrudge their piece. Also I receive(d) lots of services from the state: health, my education, my pension one day, the general economic infrastructure and so-on, so whether I think this situation is unfair I don't know. The only one that is obviously inequitable is the big slice that the landlords take.

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Gee whiz. What planet do you lot live on? Yes, there are those on here that are very frugal and have luckily paid off the big things before this crazy period we live in now, but:

Using the OP's numbers:

-£7,500 rent/mortgage

-£3,000 petrol/car costs

-£1,000 council tax

And,

-£600 for electricity, power

-£500 for gas

or

-£1200 for electricity, heat and power

Plus,

£120 home insurance

Things that are essential in our modern world, it seems:

£150 per month, car loan

£40 per month, home maintenance

£40 per month, per person for mobile phone contracts.

£30 per month for internet and phone line rentals.

£25 per mouth per week for food.

£25 per month, per person, for clothing allowance

£10 per month, tv licence

£25 per month, per person for booze

£25 per month, car maintenance

And for a family holiday, say £2500 for the two weeks somewhere decent

Things we are going to be forking out for commonly,

Parking, restaurants, cinema, gadgets, music or movies, video games, cosmetics, hairdressing, sporting fees, gym membership, books, magazines and newspapers, sweets, store bought coffee/tea, furniture, appliances, vending machines, bookies, satellite television, tuition or training, credit card/student loan/personal loan repayment, medication, etc...

It's a wonder how anybody saves anything in a month these days. It's very obvious that a £30k salary leaves nothing after expenses, unless you are very good with money and don't rely on modern conveniences. There is a very concerted effort by all forms of media to get you spending, and to make you feel inferior for not looking your part, through endless schilling and brow beating. Sad really.

Hence why the culture of debt is so profitable and keeps London alive, fat, and exuberant, and why the UK has a gross national debt of £9 trillion.

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I own my house (detached, large garden - bought with cash) and don`t run a car or have kids. I reckon about £80 a week.

Is that including, CT, water rates, gas and leccy?.......

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Its a stupid question because they will keep screwing us for higher taxes to keep these council, politicians, bankers, idiots in the life they've become accustomed too and we can't do anything because the media is controlled by champagne socialists. If there was an even bigger disparity between public and private incomes the bbc would still cover it up as being nonsense. Their threatening strikes now, these are the kind of people that only care about number 1 putting their needs above those that they are supposed to serve.

My council tax is more than 2k a month regardless of employment, to me that is just nonsense because they don't provide anywhere near the level of service worthy of that amount - it's more like a £100 value for £2,000 a month.

There have been a lot of posters on here bragging about how fantastic their salaries are and how easy it is to achieve such a level of income, but a council tax of two grand a month, now that is impressive.

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As a couple with no children we managed on a take home of 10,250 after tax

take off bills and mortgage (£300+409)

Monthly take home after tax £823

£114 for 2 people because I have done it. Question really gets screwed up though because Wife 3 months in took up JSA, after which I claimed tax credits.

With tax credits (assuming one of you is working 30+ hours) and jsa your looking at.

£472.50 + £114 = £586.50

You can have a hell of a time on that. Were pretty careful people I would say this is close to what we spent on food and fun money when the household income was £80k.

So basically 1 min wage job the partner on JSA still brings happiness but no provision for the future. I am tempted to swap over every year and game the system, very tempted.

Edit

Note, no car (Ill cycle 70 miles no problem), Pay as you go mobiles, no TV tax.

Edited by pathfinder

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Gee whiz. What planet do you lot live on? Yes, there are those on here that are very frugal and have luckily paid off the big things before this crazy period we live in now, but:

Using the OP's numbers:

-£7,500 rent/mortgage

-£3,000 petrol/car costs

-£1,000 council tax

And,

-£600 for electricity, power

-£500 for gas

or

-£1200 for electricity, heat and power

Plus,

£120 home insurance

Things that are essential in our modern world, it seems:

£150 per month, car loan

£40 per month, home maintenance

£40 per month, per person for mobile phone contracts.

£30 per month for internet and phone line rentals.

£25 per mouth per week for food.

£25 per month, per person, for clothing allowance

£10 per month, tv licence

£25 per month, per person for booze

£25 per month, car maintenance

And for a family holiday, say £2500 for the two weeks somewhere decent

Things we are going to be forking out for commonly,

Parking, restaurants, cinema, gadgets, music or movies, video games, cosmetics, hairdressing, sporting fees, gym membership, books, magazines and newspapers, sweets, store bought coffee/tea, furniture, appliances, vending machines, bookies, satellite television, tuition or training, credit card/student loan/personal loan repayment, medication, etc...

It's a wonder how anybody saves anything in a month these days. It's very obvious that a £30k salary leaves nothing after expenses, unless you are very good with money and don't rely on modern conveniences. There is a very concerted effort by all forms of media to get you spending, and to make you feel inferior for not looking your part, through endless schilling and brow beating. Sad really.

Hence why the culture of debt is so profitable and keeps London alive, fat, and exuberant, and why the UK has a gross national debt of £9 trillion.

+1!!

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Quality post.

Gee whiz. What planet do you lot live on? Yes, there are those on here that are very frugal and have luckily paid off the big things before this crazy period we live in now, but:

Using the OP's numbers:

-£7,500 rent/mortgage

-£3,000 petrol/car costs

-£1,000 council tax

And,

-£600 for electricity, power

-£500 for gas

or

-£1200 for electricity, heat and power

Plus,

£120 home insurance

Things that are essential in our modern world, it seems:

£150 per month, car loan

£40 per month, home maintenance

£40 per month, per person for mobile phone contracts.

£30 per month for internet and phone line rentals.

£25 per mouth per week for food.

£25 per month, per person, for clothing allowance

£10 per month, tv licence

£25 per month, per person for booze

£25 per month, car maintenance

And for a family holiday, say £2500 for the two weeks somewhere decent

Things we are going to be forking out for commonly,

Parking, restaurants, cinema, gadgets, music or movies, video games, cosmetics, hairdressing, sporting fees, gym membership, books, magazines and newspapers, sweets, store bought coffee/tea, furniture, appliances, vending machines, bookies, satellite television, tuition or training, credit card/student loan/personal loan repayment, medication, etc...

It's a wonder how anybody saves anything in a month these days. It's very obvious that a £30k salary leaves nothing after expenses, unless you are very good with money and don't rely on modern conveniences. There is a very concerted effort by all forms of media to get you spending, and to make you feel inferior for not looking your part, through endless schilling and brow beating. Sad really.

Hence why the culture of debt is so profitable and keeps London alive, fat, and exuberant, and why the UK has a gross national debt of £9 trillion.

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  • 312 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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