Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

okaycuckoo

Jamie Oliver - Libertarian?

Recommended Posts

Just watched a bit of Jamie's series on school food in the US.

Food wise I agree with everything he says, think he's great. Tuscan bread salad, mmmm.

But I was surprised at the politics he puts into this show. It's not party political, but to do with the freedom to introduce people to good, healthy food.

He had a problem with the caution of a fast-food business owner who rejected his Revolution Burgers. Fair enough, guy has to pay his debts to the bank and doesn't want to risk his custom. And older people don't really want to listen. So Jamie reflects on how the US has lost its sense of adventure. But at the end of the show he gets blanked out by a school authority, which refuses to allow him talk with students about their diet and the crap they get to eat. So Jamie launches into a rant about the American Revolution and the fight for freedom: "As Americans you should be ******ing furious!"

That's my take on it, so I googled and the first hit was this completely opposite view on the show in the US media:

Attacks and reality TV stunts aside, is Oliver headed the right direction? Libertarians want him silenced, but left-leaners and nutrition experts--though groaning at his on-screen histrionics--think he's on the right track.

http://www.theatlanticwire.com/entertainment/2010/03/chef-jamie-oliver-in-america-irking-libertarians-pleasing-liberals/24989/

They couldn't have got it more wrong. We have a problem labelling people for their views.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just watched a bit of Jamie's series on school food in the US.

Food wise I agree with everything he says, think he's great. Tuscan bread salad, mmmm.

But I was surprised at the politics he puts into this show. It's not party political, but to do with the freedom to introduce people to good, healthy food.

He had a problem with the caution of a fast-food business owner who rejected his Revolution Burgers. Fair enough, guy has to pay his debts to the bank and doesn't want to risk his custom. And older people don't really want to listen. So Jamie reflects on how the US has lost its sense of adventure. But at the end of the show he gets blanked out by a school authority, which refuses to allow him talk with students about their diet and the crap they get to eat. So Jamie launches into a rant about the American Revolution and the fight for freedom: "As Americans you should be ******ing furious!"

That's my take on it, so I googled and the first hit was this completely opposite view on the show in the US media:

Attacks and reality TV stunts aside, is Oliver headed the right direction? Libertarians want him silenced, but left-leaners and nutrition experts--though groaning at his on-screen histrionics--think he's on the right track.

http://www.theatlanticwire.com/entertainment/2010/03/chef-jamie-oliver-in-america-irking-libertarians-pleasing-liberals/24989/

They couldn't have got it more wrong. We have a problem labelling people for their views.

No, they got it right - they perceive him as telling them what to do - as far as they are concerned, their freedom is to eat what they want. This is reflected in the comments.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No, they got it right - they perceive him as telling them what to do - as far as they are concerned, their freedom is to eat what they want. This is reflected in the comments.

Disagree. He wants to show them. They insist on being told.

I think the real point comes out in the school authority cutting him off - looks like a bureaucratic combination of "protecting" children's rights and wanting not to be sued.

Anyway, he's a genius.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The most likely reason the school(s) didn't want to know.

http://www.commondreams.org/headlines01/0227-01.htm

Published on Tuesday, February 27, 2001 in the Washington Post

Pushers

US Schools Hooked on Junk Food Proceeds

by David Nakamura

It's lunchtime at Montgomery Blair High School and junior Trevor Obarakpor, 16, is placing his order: a 20-ounce Pepsi, a honey bun and a Twix candy bar.

Sophomore Adrianne Schmidt, 15, lining up at the same row of vending machines, chooses a Dr Pepper, a bag of Cheetos and a pack of peanut M&M's.

The students may be junk food junkies, but the schools are hooked, too, increasingly dependent on the revenue that soda and candy machines bring in each year.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The most likely reason the school(s) didn't want to know.

http://www.commondreams.org/headlines01/0227-01.htm

Published on Tuesday, February 27, 2001 in the Washington Post

Pushers

US Schools Hooked on Junk Food Proceeds

by David Nakamura

It's lunchtime at Montgomery Blair High School and junior Trevor Obarakpor, 16, is placing his order: a 20-ounce Pepsi, a honey bun and a Twix candy bar.

Sophomore Adrianne Schmidt, 15, lining up at the same row of vending machines, chooses a Dr Pepper, a bag of Cheetos and a pack of peanut M&M's.

The students may be junk food junkies, but the schools are hooked, too, increasingly dependent on the revenue that soda and candy machines bring in each year.

...yes ...no longer the land of the free ...just slaves and victims of poison to the multi nationals profits ....we are not far from the same .....Jamies on the right track ....the press need the multi's for their advertising revenue .... :rolleyes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The most likely reason the school(s) didn't want to know.

http://www.commondre...s01/0227-01.htm

Published on Tuesday, February 27, 2001 in the Washington Post

Pushers

US Schools Hooked on Junk Food Proceeds

by David Nakamura

It's lunchtime at Montgomery Blair High School and junior Trevor Obarakpor, 16, is placing his order: a 20-ounce Pepsi, a honey bun and a Twix candy bar.

Sophomore Adrianne Schmidt, 15, lining up at the same row of vending machines, chooses a Dr Pepper, a bag of Cheetos and a pack of peanut M&M's.

The students may be junk food junkies, but the schools are hooked, too, increasingly dependent on the revenue that soda and candy machines bring in each year.

Sounds like the way my kids schools are going. Branded 'free' learning aids from big supermarket chains (if Doritos are 80p at Sainsbury's, what's the price of 4 packs?), branded junk drink vending machines courtesy of NuLabs pfi deals, etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The students may be junk food junkies, but the schools are hooked, too, increasingly dependent on the revenue that soda and candy machines bring in each year.

Fans of the animated TV series Daria will remember the episode "Fizz Ed." which dealt with this very subject.

Leonard Lamm - So what we're really talking about is a lens of fiscal focus concentrating the diffused light of our students' discretionary spending into a laser beam of economic clout.

Ms. Li [school principal] - Mr. Lamm, I like the way that sounds.

Lamm - How many soda machines do we have in this institution?

Ms. Li - Two in the cafeteria and one in the teachers' lounge.

Lamm - Three? No, we need at least four times that number.

Ms. Li - But can we really make up the budget deficit with the proceeds on cans of soda?

Lamm - Oh, it's not the cans. It's the exclusive contract.

Ms. Li - What contract?

Lamm - See, what I do is represent your interests to the soda companies. I say to each of them, "I've got a high school that's willing to sell no other beverages but yours in its cafeterias, at its dances, sporting events, whatever. They'll advertise and sell your product exclusively."

Ms. Li - Advertise?

Lamm - Tasteful little posters. "And all you have to do, Mr. Soda Company Fatcat, is hand over, oh, let's say $50,000 to be used as the school sees fit."

Ms. Li - (reverently) $50,000...

Lamm - And that's if we don't get a bidding war going.

Ms. Li - Hmm... you don't think it's unseemly to have advert -- promotion -- inside school corridors?

Lamm - Ms. Li, our kids see advertising when they turn on the TV, when they log onto the web, when they drive the highways and walk through the malls. Do we really want school to be a sheltered ivory tower that fails to prepare them for life outside its walls?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Disagree. He wants to show them. They insist on being told.

I think the real point comes out in the school authority cutting him off - looks like a bureaucratic combination of "protecting" children's rights and wanting not to be sued.

Anyway, he's a genius.

The agribusinesses have huge political sway. Ketchup is a vegetable goddamit!

From what I have seen, the US school meals system has been completely captured by big business shovelling sh*t down kids mouths.

Land of the free etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fans of the animated TV series Daria will remember the episode "Fizz Ed." which dealt with this very subject.

Leonard Lamm - So what we're really talking about is a lens of fiscal focus concentrating the diffused light of our students' discretionary spending into a laser beam of economic clout.

Ms. Li [school principal] - Mr. Lamm, I like the way that sounds.

Lamm - How many soda machines do we have in this institution?

Ms. Li - Two in the cafeteria and one in the teachers' lounge.

Lamm - Three? No, we need at least four times that number.

Ms. Li - But can we really make up the budget deficit with the proceeds on cans of soda?

Lamm - Oh, it's not the cans. It's the exclusive contract.

Ms. Li - What contract?

Lamm - See, what I do is represent your interests to the soda companies. I say to each of them, "I've got a high school that's willing to sell no other beverages but yours in its cafeterias, at its dances, sporting events, whatever. They'll advertise and sell your product exclusively."

Ms. Li - Advertise?

Lamm - Tasteful little posters. "And all you have to do, Mr. Soda Company Fatcat, is hand over, oh, let's say $50,000 to be used as the school sees fit."

Ms. Li - (reverently) $50,000...

Lamm - And that's if we don't get a bidding war going.

Ms. Li - Hmm... you don't think it's unseemly to have advert -- promotion -- inside school corridors?

Lamm - Ms. Li, our kids see advertising when they turn on the TV, when they log onto the web, when they drive the highways and walk through the malls. Do we really want school to be a sheltered ivory tower that fails to prepare them for life outside its walls?

20 years ago, the university I was an UG elected a student union that made New Labour and the Tories look like amateurs. One of the first things they did was do a deal with Pepsi across all the cafeterias and all the drinks machines on campus...except one.

The maths student society, owned its own drinks machine over which the union did not have jurisdiction, so we could still take deliveries of Coca Cola. Campus of 18,000 students with one coke machine. You do the math :) We were filling the thing 4 times a day and all the filing cabinets had bags and bags of coins that we hadn't had time to count yet. A dozen honours students spent Friday afternoons counting and bagging mounds of coins that would make Smaug green with envy. It was a very good year for the society.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just watched a bit of Jamie's series on school food in the US.

Food wise I agree with everything he says, think he's great. Tuscan bread salad, mmmm.

But I was surprised at the politics he puts into this show. It's not party political, but to do with the freedom to introduce people to good, healthy food.

He had a problem with the caution of a fast-food business owner who rejected his Revolution Burgers. Fair enough, guy has to pay his debts to the bank and doesn't want to risk his custom. And older people don't really want to listen. So Jamie reflects on how the US has lost its sense of adventure. But at the end of the show he gets blanked out by a school authority, which refuses to allow him talk with students about their diet and the crap they get to eat. So Jamie launches into a rant about the American Revolution and the fight for freedom: "As Americans you should be ******ing furious!"

That's my take on it, so I googled and the first hit was this completely opposite view on the show in the US media:

Attacks and reality TV stunts aside, is Oliver headed the right direction? Libertarians want him silenced, but left-leaners and nutrition experts--though groaning at his on-screen histrionics--think he's on the right track.

http://www.theatlanticwire.com/entertainment/2010/03/chef-jamie-oliver-in-america-irking-libertarians-pleasing-liberals/24989/

They couldn't have got it more wrong. We have a problem labelling people for their views.

Whatever the rights and wrongs - would the Yanks ever like a Brit telling them what to do? - personally I'm utterly sick of seeing his face everywhere. In Homebase garden centre the other day there were stands full of Jamie Oliver seeds, FGS.

I thought he was brilliant when he first started the cookery shows - great ideas and refreshingly unpretentious. But he's way overexposed IMO, and cashing in on absolutely anything to do with food. Guess you can't blame him for that, if people are mug enough to pay extra for the J.O 'brand'.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I watched this show , he was speaking to some parents at a school in California and they needed an interpretor because the mothers were all Mexican and only speak Spanish.Glad i don't live over there , a civil war is brewing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No, they got it right - they perceive him as telling them what to do - as far as they are concerned, their freedom is to eat what they want. This is reflected in the comments.

They're already being told via PR and advertizing.

They're already being dictated to via narrow choice offered to them.

Jamie's more libertarian than they.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Disagree. He wants to show them. They insist on being told.

I think the real point comes out in the school authority cutting him off - looks like a bureaucratic combination of "protecting" children's rights and wanting not to be sued.

Anyway, he's a genius.

I agree. The school authority's impersonation of the KGB was TV gold. Banning him from filming in the cafeteria! It made the school system look like some kind of totaliterian state.

Bye bye the land of the free. Bye bye liberty.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I watched this show , he was speaking to some parents at a school in California and they needed an interpretor because the mothers were all Mexican and only speak Spanish.Glad i don't live over there , a civil war is brewing.

From what I remember, aren't some Mexicans wanted to reconquer California. La reconquesta, or something to that order.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ever been to Bradford?

Huge influx of Mexicans in Bradford.... They are known locally as Mexistans and one of them is called Gary or it could be Dennis.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

He's a total prat but I'm completely behind his cause.

I'm just glad I have the freedom to switch the telly off when he's on.

To his credit, his TED talk was very good:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The agribusinesses have huge political sway. Ketchup is a vegetable goddamit!

From what I have seen, the US school meals system has been completely captured by big business shovelling sh*t down kids mouths.

Land of the free etc.

exactly, that's the battle he has taken on and his first task is persuading the yanks there is even anything wrong going on. I loved his first series, great TV :D It's really bigger than food as well, if he can open their eyes that it's possible that big business is not their friend it's a lesson they can take with them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In Homebase garden centre the other day there were stands full of Jamie Oliver seeds, FGS.

Grow your own Jamie Oliver?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Disagree. He wants to show them. They insist on being told.

I think the real point comes out in the school authority cutting him off - looks like a bureaucratic combination of "protecting" children's rights and wanting not to be sued.

Anyway, he's a genius.

You are quite right, and I'm all for what he's doing, but my point is that the article was telling it how Americans see it - in their eyes he is telling them what to do.

The problem, in my opinion, that many libertarians have, is a blind spot over big business - because it's not the government and they have a choice between corporations, it can't be bad. Of course, many state socialists can have the same blind spot over the government.

In this programme, the resistant parents believe that the current situation in their school has been down to free choice on their part - that's how America works in their eyes. Hence Jamie looks like he is telling them what to do, restricting the free choice that they have made.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

People don't like to be hectored to. There is also no proof that fatty foods lead to obesity, its more likely over consumption of ANY food whatever it is (french paradox) and the chemicals and hormones they stuff into them

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

He needs to sort out his selling techniques so he can sell the idea better, maybe getting a good sale persons in to help would help him overcome the barriers he faces becuase that is all it ultimately boils down, being able to sell it.

Jeez, if anyone knows how to sell things it's Jamie Oliver.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

He's a total prat but I'm completely behind his cause.

I'm just glad I have the freedom to switch the telly off when he's on.

To his credit, his TED talk was very good:

Interesting video - he's definitely not libertarian! All the solutions come through government and corporations, no real role for the family.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • 284 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.