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Unhappy Families: Uk Is Third Worst In Europe For Home Life

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Government has let down parents and children as debts and long working hours exact a major toll on Britons, says new research

Britain is one of the worst countries in Europe for families, according to a study released today by the Relationships Foundation. High levels of debt and poverty, coupled with long and unsocial working hours, are major contributing factors, the report, Family Pressure Gauge, reveals.

[...]

British families are among the most pressured in Europe, only ahead of Bulgaria and Romania.

Stress from money and work worries, along with a lack of support for parents and poor living conditions, are all factors, the report finds.

[...]

The report also reveals that 14 per cent of families are suffering "critical" levels of debt, compared to 1 per cent of Swedish, Finnish and Norwegian households.

In addition, almost a quarter of the average British working family income goes on childcare costsdouble the percentage spent by French families and three times that for German families.

[...]

Britain also ranks as the second worst country in Europe for maternity and paternity leave, with new parents receiving less than ten weeks fully paid time off on average.

One in 20, or 340,800, British families live in "severe housing deprivation" – in overcrowded homes in poor condition, without a bath, shower or indoor toilet, for example. This is 12 times more than in the Netherlands, and significantly worse than in the Nordic countries, Germany and Spain.

The report provides the most comprehensive picture to date of how British families fare compared with counterparts in 26 European countries, based on an analysis of 25 indicators, including pressures of money, work, parenting and living conditions. It draws on data from the European Union, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development and the European Commission.

[...]

Read full article here:

http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and-families/health-news/unhappy-families-uk-is-third-worst-in-europe-for-home-life-2287443.html

In other words the UK is drowning in debt at all levels, individuals, families, public services and government.

Well done banksters, you have succeeded in bleeding the whole country dry.

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To be fair, a lot of people have put themselves into debt.

Nobody forced them to buy loads of tat with their credit cards! Nobody forced them to put the £2000 new TV or £20000 car on credit.

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To be fair, a lot of people have put themselves into debt.

Nobody forced them to buy loads of tat with their credit cards! Nobody forced them to put the £2000 new TV or £20000 car on credit.

I agree. : from the article in the Independant

Quote We owe £160,000 and are paying the interest only right now. We also have debts of about £32,000 – it sounds horrendous every time I say it.

The guy is 53 years old...no sense

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Read full article here:

http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and-families/health-news/unhappy-families-uk-is-third-worst-in-europe-for-home-life-2287443.html

In other words the UK is drowning in debt at all levels, individuals, families, public services and government.

Well done banksters, you have succeeded in bleeding the whole country dry.

Hmm, sounds about right although I hesitate to believe the part about no the proportion without a shower/bath/toilet.

Thing is, it's only going to get worse too. Rates must rise, which will expose the folly of QE. The UK is about to become a much worse place to live.

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To be fair, a lot of people have put themselves into debt.

Nobody forced them to buy loads of tat with their credit cards! Nobody forced them to put the £2000 new TV or £20000 car on credit.

Most of the debt is due to mortgages and as anyone who has been on HPC for a while knows, all it needs is a few people taking on more debt to push the prices up for everyone else, so blaming it on the people is a naive point of view.

The main problem is our debt-based monetary system and fractionary reserve banking system which together with an economy centered on finance and banking means that debt is necessary to keep the economy growing.

---

Edited by wise_eagle

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I agree. : from the article in the Independant

Quote We owe £160,000 and are paying the interest only right now. We also have debts of about £32,000 – it sounds horrendous every time I say it.

The guy is 53 years old...no sense

There are many people who ought to go bankrupt, on the face of it he is one of them. Indignation aside, there's no need to put yourself in an early grave to feed some bankers. No doubt he's made questionable decisions, but the punishment is far too severe. He may well lose 'his' house, but he'll sleep better without the debt, I don't doubt it.

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There are many people who ought to go bankrupt, on the face of it he is one of them. Indignation aside, there's no need to put yourself in an early grave to feed some bankers. No doubt he's made questionable decisions, but the punishment is far too severe. He may well lose 'his' house, but he'll sleep better without the debt, I don't doubt it.

Except going bankrupt means the government will print to cover the losses, which means everybody else shares in his poor decision making even though they had no hand in it, people like me. WTF should I pay for somebody else's mistakes?

Now if only we changed bankruptcy laws so people couldn't go bankrupt. I would love that you dig your hole why should you bet let out of it?

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Except going bankrupt means the government will print to cover the losses, which means everybody else shares in his poor decision making even though they had no hand in it, people like me. WTF should I pay for somebody else's mistakes?

Now if only we changed bankruptcy laws so people couldn't go bankrupt. I would love that you dig your hole why should you bet let out of it?

It is a compelling argument TCG, don't get me wrong. It's just that the stakes have become so hgh these days with the price of pwoperdee that one error can mean a lifetime of poverty.

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It is a compelling argument TCG, don't get me wrong. It's just that the stakes have become so hgh these days with the price of pwoperdee that one error can mean a lifetime of poverty.

But with this form of moral hazard, people would be more inclined to look before they take that leap.

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"

One in 20, or 340,800, British families live in "severe housing deprivation" – in overcrowded homes in poor condition, without a bath, shower or indoor toilet, for example. This is 12 times more than in the Netherlands, and significantly worse than in the Nordic countries, Germany and Spain."

20x 340,800 is about 6,816,000 families... - is that the total number of families in the UK?

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To be fair, a lot of people have put themselves into debt.

Nobody forced them to buy loads of tat with their credit cards! Nobody forced them to put the £2000 new TV or £20000 car on credit.

But as my ex kept telling me - thats what EVERYONE does :blink:

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There are many people who ought to go bankrupt, on the face of it he is one of them. Indignation aside, there's no need to put yourself in an early grave to feed some bankers. No doubt he's made questionable decisions, but the punishment is far too severe. He may well lose 'his' house, but he'll sleep better without the debt, I don't doubt it.

The punishment is not too severe. It's ultimately for his own good. And if it happens on a grand enough scale it's for the good of everybody else too. The system has to be allowed to crash - it's what it is ultimately designed to do.

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Britain will remain unhappy for as long as the population is forced to service the needs of the monarchy and plutocrats.

It's as simple as that, and our brief reprieve created by two world wars and North Sea oil is dead.

All hail the blue-bloods, your masters.

This is Britain. Same as it ever was.

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Britain will remain unhappy for as long as the population is forced to service the needs of the monarchy and plutocrats.

It's as simple as that, and our brief reprieve created by two world wars and North Sea oil is dead.

All hail the blue-bloods, your masters.

This is Britain. Same as it ever was.

Britain has become the worse place to live in Europe, from housing to life enjoyment, the people that should hold teh blame are the MPs and their policies.

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But with this form of moral hazard, people would be more inclined to look before they take that leap.

I agree, but with the amounts of debt being so much higher these days it is pretty much impossible for someone to dig themselves out. I don't think that helps society as a whole, just as being able to walk away too easy doesn't either. There are pi$$takers of course but equally there are others who have simply been unlucky. I'm not sure what the solution is, but I think there is a problem which helps to destroy the fabric of society as it pitches people against each other. The possibility of bankruptcy ought to have been a moderating force on lenders, especially with higher value loans, (of which I'd say £160k on a £35k salary qualifies) but it all went out the window in the mad decade as we know. Banks trying to turn the heat on the borrowers when they ought to be looking in the mirror at least as much imo. They employed legions of 'risk assessment' bods whose job was nothing more than an exercise in rubber stamping.

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The punishment is not too severe. It's ultimately for his own good. And if it happens on a grand enough scale it's for the good of everybody else too. The system has to be allowed to crash - it's what it is ultimately designed to do.

oh I meant the punishment of having to pay it all back is too severe, not the bankruptcy. I think he ought to go bankrupt. Is that what you meant too?

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I agree, but with the amounts of debt being so much higher these days it is pretty much impossible for someone to dig themselves out. I don't think that helps society as a whole, just as being able to walk away too easy doesn't either.

Well we'd have been saved the unplesantness of Alan Sugar appearing on TV constantly pretending he is some sort of Guru... he went bankrupt twice.

Either that or it should last longer, MUCH longer, not quite like herpes a life sentence but be at least 3-5 years instead of one measly year.

Edited by ken_ichikawa

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Well we'd have been saved the unplesantness of Alan Sugar appearing on TV constantly pretending he is some sort of Guru... he went bankrupt twice.

Either that or it should last longer, MUCH longer, not quite like herpes a life sentence but be at least 3-5 years instead of one measly year.

The bankruptcy law was relaxed not long before the credit bubble, reduced to being discharged after one year...was that to encourage risk and enterprise to wash, rinse and repeat again? ;)

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Well done banksters, you have succeeded in bleeding the whole country dry.

How about blaming the people who've been running the country for the last 13 years rather than an imaginary bunch of bogeymen.

Well done Gordon, Tony etc. You have succeeded in bleeding the whole country dry.

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To be fair, a lot of people have put themselves into debt.

Nobody forced them to buy loads of tat with their credit cards! Nobody forced them to put the £2000 new TV or £20000 car on credit.

How true. The 'Because we're worth it' factor.

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Well we'd have been saved the unplesantness of Alan Sugar appearing on TV constantly pretending he is some sort of Guru... he went bankrupt twice.

Either that or it should last longer, MUCH longer, not quite like herpes a life sentence but be at least 3-5 years instead of one measly year.

Seems reasonable. A longer bankruptcy period has merits as it would allow a decent adjustment to the 'new regime' and I guess if someone is unable to clear it after 5 years then likely they never will.

I must say I find the 'pre-pack' arrangements in relation to companies to be little short of legalised theft.

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  • 312 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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