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The Masked Tulip

4 Minute Countdown On Moneyweek

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If you go to Moneyweek now, wait a few minutes for their "Do you wish to subscribe" pop-up box appearing, there is this very bearish podcast about UK house prices.

Telling people to get out of property now or to avoid buying now.

I think it is an ad wanting you to subscribe to something, but it might be of interest.

Edited by The Masked Tulip

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Moneyweek have been saying this for a while, though, haven't they. (Is it six or seven years now...?)

I'm not saying that doesn't mean the "stopped clock" might soon be right though!

Edited by SLL

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Moneyweek have been saying this for a while, though, haven't they. (Is it six or seven years now...?)

I'm not saying that doesn't mean the "stopped clock" might soon be right though!

Fair point.

The same can be said of HPC. Truth is, neither had any idea about QE and what measures would be taken to prop up the housing market.

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Aye, who would have thought that the MPs were so far into property debt that they would rather see a currency collapse than suffer personally.

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At what point did we pass the stage that a HPC would be so bad as to affect the majority rather than the minority?

I'd say somewhere around 2003. imagine if at that point those in charge considered the danger of a housing bubble forming and released the pressure of it, They could have done this in many ways - by taxing BTL, by raising rates, by giving tenants security of tenure > 6 months etc

but no, they took the stupid, simple, greedy option.

dum******s

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They have looked at their web stats, seen sizeable traffic from HPC, so think "hmm time to do another bearish property article to get some cash in."

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Fair point.

The same can be said of HPC. Truth is, neither had any idea about QE and what measures would be taken to prop up the housing market.

I think that's a little unfair to the inflationistas.

They were screaming about money printing way before the credit crunch.

As to Moneyweek, I think they are still waiting for Japan to come good too.

Edited by Timm

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I think that's a little unfair to the inflationistas.

They were screaming about money printing way before the credit crunch.

As to Moneyweek, I think they are still waiting for Japan to come good too.

Yeah, that big wave sort of messed that one up for the meantime.

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Fair point.

The same can be said of HPC. Truth is, neither had any idea about QE and what measures would be taken to prop up the housing market.

I tend to agree with this assessment. I belive we are down about 20% overall from peak--but so what? Peak was unrealistic and prices are now just high instead of ludicrously high.

We need another 20% down for there to be any HPC satisfaction.

No one would have guessed the extent to which the VIs would go to prop up that which IS the UK. Even Merv kowtows to HPI knowing one little hike and its HPC big time.

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Moneyweek have been saying this for a while, though, haven't they. (Is it six or seven years now...?)

I'm not saying that doesn't mean the "stopped clock" might soon be right though!

Hi Pimp!

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Pimp? I'm not sure that I get the point you're trying to make, but "hello" anyway!

TMT - you're absolutely right. I don't think back in 2001 many of us appreciated the huge VI of the people that make the rules of the game.

I didn't. And I certainly didn't expect house prices to head to the stratosphere about 2 years before I would financially be in a position to buy one. I spent the next 9 years of my life in a semi-nomadic existence living on a student budget and saving like crazy but still watching the ladder get further and further away.

The "opportunity cost" of studying for a higher degree will be about £500k once mortgage interest is factored in. I can look on the bright side - at least I'm not having to pay a graduate tax for the privilege... (but that's another discussion entirely)

The market (and associated debt) has now become so grossly over-inflated that default is the only real option - either directly as the result of a crash (leading to bank insolvencies), or indirectly via inflation. Or maybe a little bit of both. I guess is on another 5-10% nominal (happening over 1-2 years) and 25% through inflation (drawn out over the next 5-10 years).

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There was some economist on the radio this morning tlaking about uni fees and she quite simply said that if she was at uni age today she would not go - she said the 30K debt that most students will end up with might never be payed back.

She said she would go and do a business admin apprenticeship - no idea if such things exist - instead.

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  • 312 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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