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Richard

Property Knowledge Question

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Hi

This morning I have heard someone assert the view that all else being equal (to the extent that two properties can be compared), bunglalows command a premium over houses.

I must admit this was news to me.

Firstly, I'm interested in whether this is a widely accepted view.

Secondly, I'm interested in any reasons why this is (or might be) the case. The possible reasons offered in my conversation this morning were:

- Lifestyle advantages

- Better structural integrity versus a house

- Demand created by people not wanting stairs (e.g. families with disabled members or people of more mature years).

- Desirability of not hearing people walking above.

All views/analyses welcome.

Thanks in advance,

Richard

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Hi

This morning I have heard someone assert the view that all else being equal (to the extent that two properties can be compared), bunglalows command a premium over houses.

I must admit this was news to me.

Firstly, I'm interested in whether this is a widely accepted view.

Secondly, I'm interested in any reasons why this is (or might be) the case. The possible reasons offered in my conversation this morning were:

- Lifestyle advantages

- Better structural integrity versus a house

- Demand created by people not wanting stairs (e.g. families with disabled members or people of more mature years).

- Desirability of not hearing people walking above.

All views/analyses welcome.

Thanks in advance,

Richard

It does seem that bungalows do command a "premium". My dad is about to build a new bungalow (in south east), the area is very popular with OAPs moving to live by the sea and they all seem to want bungalows.

The plot could have got permission for a house or chalet bungalow, but it is likely to prove much easier to sell a bungalow, due to the fact the it attracts the "grey pound".

Also, build costs tend to be cheaper, so the margin is more attractive to builders'.

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Bungalows are a natural choice for some elderly people who no longer wish to navigate the staris or no longer can and also for those with a disability.

There are less bungalows than houses so people who need them (and want to stay in a specific area) will pay over the odds for one.

I actually like bungalows.althoug I have never lived in one...all the benefits of a flat (e.g one floor, easy housework) but with your own front door and garden.

A friend of mine (young.. with one small child) has just moved into one and loves it.

I think it comes down to supply and demand and as housing becomes more condensed we will see less bungalows being built

:(

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Having lived in houses and one bungalow we prefer bungalow.

Not necessarily related to one's age.

Caveat for both houses and bugalows is so long as most internal walls are brick/block and not stud/Stramit.

Living one end, sleeping the other means the night owl can play, the lark can sleep.

Reason given for price premium used to be that more land required for bungalow to give same floor area as house with same size garden.

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Having lived in houses and one bungalow we prefer bungalow.

Not necessarily related to one's age.

Caveat for both houses and bugalows is so long as most internal walls are brick/block and not stud/Stramit.

Living one end, sleeping the other means the night owl can play, the lark can sleep.

Reason given for price premium used to be that more land required for bungalow to give same floor area as house with same size garden.

detailed surveys have prove those households domicile in bungalows are more content.

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Having lived in a flat and a house I would say that having all your living space on one floor makes a place feel bigger.

In a house you 'live' on the ground floor, and sleep in the upstairs bedrooms. Thus for most of the day you don't even see the bedroom space.

In a flat, especially if you have kids, the whole of the floorspace is used for living all through the day.

Hence bungalows are like enormous flats (in a positive sense!).

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Guest struthitsruth

Bungalows have always been regarded as lower maintainence - you can usually get to all the exterior without massive ladders or scaffold and do paint/repair/cleaning work yourself if so inclined.

Recently they have attracted the prop developers because of their potential for adding more living space in roof or another storey subject to pp of course.

I like them, and have lived in them, but have never bought one, usually beyond my price range.

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Recently they have attracted the prop developers because of their potential for adding more living space in roof or another storey subject to pp of course.

Another favourite is for a propery developer to buy a bungalow with a big garden and replace it with houses.

I have seen quite a few bungalows demolished and replaced with four 4 bedroom 'executive' houses.

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Never really got the difference in terms of terminology. Could somebody please clarify. I thought a bungalow was a cute house. But all this posting seems to imply that it is a single story house.

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Not sure if you are kidding, but it is a single stor[e]y house. :huh:

(EDITED for bad spelling - wryly observed by mushroom.)

Durch, I wasn't joking. I come from Australia. We do 'Big f*****g single story houses, single story houses and 'bungalows' - indicating a small timber frame fibre or timber clad house. Only people whose parents immigrated from the mediterranian in the late 1940s generally have two story houses (being more interesting generally! ... unless you live in the gentrified inner city where they have terraces with balconies at the front). Only in the last 25 or so years have we migrated to more unconventional builds - and I haven't been their for the last 8 of those. Thanks for responding :)

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I recently thought a bungalow would be nice, as there are some very nice ones in my area.

I also assumed they would be cheaper, but having looked at the prices they were suprisingly, a disappointingly expensive, so I guess its fair to say that they do command a premium.

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  • 301 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
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      • up 5%



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