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karhu

Big New Rise In Debt Judgements

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Guest Charlie The Tramp
Nearly 400,000 CCJs were issued in England and Wales, 140,000 more than in the first six months of last year.

Not very good at maths, but would that work out to 15% of the total population.

Fifteen in every hundred? :(

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Not very good at maths, but would that work out to 15% of the total population.

Fifteen in every hundred? :(

Isn't it likely that some people will have multiple CCJs, so the number of people may be lower?

Still doesn't negate the message of course.

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Not very good at maths, but would that work out to 15% of the total population.

Fifteen in every hundred? :(

UK population 60.5 million. Therefore 0.7% or about 1 in every hundred including men, women and children.

Edited by karhu

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If you take the total population it is about 0.6% (60m people), but if you take the working population (28m) it is about 1.4%

Assuming my estimates of population are about right.

Edited by FTBagain

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Guest Charlie The Tramp
UK population 60.5 million. Therefore 0.7% or about 1 in every hundred including men, women and children.

Cheers.

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It says:

However, the increase can be partly explained by the DVLA taking out 108,000 CCJs for road tax violations.

But they fail to member the number of CCJs taken out by the DVLA in the previous 6 months! Not really much to compare with - it's not 0 to 108,000.. Spin spin spin.

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The solution here of course (for the debtors), is to eat lots of pies & mars bars take some industrial stregth ugly pills & then phone Ocean Finance...they'll sort you out "just give 'em a go"

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Not very good at maths, but would that work out to 15% of the total population.

Fifteen in every hundred? :(

well if thats the level of maths skills in the UK today i'm not surprised debt is increasing

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The solution here of course (for the debtors), is to eat lots of pies & mars bars take some industrial stregth ugly pills & then phone Ocean Finance...they'll sort you out "just give 'em a go"

Bear in mind that borrower needs to possess at least three chins in order to qualify for an Ocean Finance loan.

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Guest Charlie The Tramp
well if thats the level of maths skills in the UK today i'm not surprised debt is increasing

Used a calculator 60m divided by 400k % of = 15. So sorry never went on to higher education never had the opportunity but was brilliant at doing my company`s accounts according to my accountant. :P

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Used a calculator 60m divided by 400k % of = 15. So sorry never went on to higher education never had the opportunity but was brilliant at doing my company`s accounts according to my accountant. :P

wow the chairman of Enron makes a surprise appearance on HPC forums!!

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Used a calculator 60m divided by 400k % of = 15. So sorry never went on to higher education never had the opportunity but was brilliant at doing my company`s accounts according to my accountant. :P

Obviously a natural at "creative" accounting then?

:)

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Bear in mind that borrower needs to possess at least three chins in order to qualify for an Ocean Finance loan.

Need a big fat wobbly wife sitting next to you as well.

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Used a calculator 60m divided by 400k % of = 15. So sorry never went on to higher education never had the opportunity but was brilliant at doing my company`s accounts according to my accountant. :P

Charlie, I am genuinely surprised at you making this schoolboy error. Were you on the sauce last night?

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Guest Charlie The Tramp
Charlie, I am genuinely surprised at you making this schoolboy error. Were you on the sauce last night?

Yep!

Use of calculator in business was for working out VAT on invoices until some nice programmer supplied software which took the terrible strain out of it.

No calculators when I was a schoolboy all mental arithmetic. The old hard drive in the head is a little full now and the retrieval system takes a little longer, no inbuilt google I`m afraid.

:D

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Used a calculator 60m divided by 400k % of = 15. So sorry never went on to higher education never had the opportunity but was brilliant at doing my company`s accounts according to my accountant. :P

ermmm I make it more like 0.66%

60million / 100 = 600K

400K / 600K = .66

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Guest Charlie The Tramp
ermmm I make it more like 0.66%

60million / 100 = 600K

400K / 600K = .66

Spot on, tried it again the vat way and yes .66. :)

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Guest KingCharles1st

Nearly 400,000 CCJs were issued in England and Wales, 140,000 more than in the first six months of last year.

Malcolm Hurlston, chairman of the Registry Trust, which collates CCJ figures, said the rise was "clear proof of a deteriorating economy".

This is rather worrying- firstly forget all the percentage crap further up the thread.

Having sailed very close to the CCJ disaster, I would point out that the reason these people have had ccj's plastered against them is the fact they haven't paid for 6-9-12 months- whatever the item/bill/whatever.

It takes quite a while to get people to court- the most prolific instructors of this sort of action being county councils (poll tax) licensing etc. In fact, they have big contracts with collection firms (bailiffs) to chase the "can almost afford it's" really hard, but virtually forget about the "can't pay- never pay" brigade- so endemic of our personal economy when related to things like motoring fines, parking fines, so on.

Court action is is not something the normal average sized business would inflict upon a customer unless it was the only way to get their money. Councils now just go straight for the jugular- no if's buts or maybe's.

Why should I care..?

So the figures recorded going through court NOW, apply to the timescale and trading environment of 6-12 months ago, or even longer. What then will the figures be like in 12 months from now, with the fallout from negative equity, mass unemployment, credit card clawbacks- I absolutely dread to think. This is why credit card companies are doubling their min repayment- for no other reason- they want their money back before it is gone for good. It's also why over the last three to four years many business now demand payment up front, or with despatch of goods, the days of 30 day account are dwindling rapidly.

God help H.M.S. UK, and all that sail in her...

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  • 301 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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