Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum
interestrateripoff

More Graduates Taking Low-Skill Jobs - Report

Recommended Posts

Surely it's the highly paid 'clever clogs' that will lose out the most in the coming decades, given the sheer amount of cheaper global alternatives waiting to replace them?!

It's laughable how the the skilled think they're untouchable. Globalists should be careful in what they wish for.

The skilled point is a good one - any skill you can learn, a thousand hungry other folks can learn better or quicker than you. And if it's expensive - the more incentive to automate or outsource it.

Perhaps they just hope to work the system long enough to retire rich. Peak oil/other resource aside - it's hard to imagine there won't be huge amounts of leveling of incomes/opportunities worldwide. The only debate is how long it might take. A decade or two maybe? Or perhaps even a century.

I reckon the people close to the money will probably still continue to work out a way to skim something off the top of it though. Interesting that while most industries seem to be reducing labour and costs - investment banks have only got bigger and salaries more expensive over the last 30 years or so.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
It's laughable how the the skilled think they're untouchable. Globalists should be careful in what they wish for.

I imagine a lot of people who went into the law thought this way- but now the corporates have embraced automation and outsourcing in their own business's, they are asking their legal eagles why they aren't doing the same, and getting a bit twitchy about being charged massive fees for stuff that could either be computerised or sent off to India.

Anyone who has a job that essentially boils down to manipulating data on a screen should be worried in my opinion, because there are two large groups of people eyeing up their source of income- one is the programmers who would like to automate it into dumbed down chunks that any desk monkey could deliver, and other is the graduate from India and china who will do it for a lot less. Or an unholy blending of the two.

A lot of people who claim that no machine could do their job are probably right- but take that job and chop it into smaller segments, throw a lot of computing power at each segment and in many cases they will succeed in automating it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Surely it's the highly paid 'clever clogs' that will lose out the most in the coming decades, given the sheer amount of cheaper global alternatives waiting to replace them?!

It's laughable how the the skilled think they're untouchable. Globalists should be careful in what they wish for.

Another problem for the clever clogs is things simply won't get done.

Car companies will go bust and not need car designers, bridges won't be built as no one will have capital to invest in them, computer games won't be designed as people can't fork out the £40+ needed for them etc etc as almost all people get a lot poorer, and start focusing on subsistence needs only.

People are literally going to spend their money on food, utilities and maybe getting pissed, but nothing else.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another problem for the clever clogs is things simply won't get done.

Car companies will go bust and not need car designers, bridges won't be built as no one will have capital to invest in them, computer games won't be designed as people can't fork out the £40+ needed for them etc etc as almost all people get a lot poorer, and start focusing on subsistence needs only.

People are literally going to spend their money on food, utilities and maybe getting pissed, but nothing else.

Thats a lot of my argument for a massive printing/national dividend.

I see more and more people sitting around broke. They can't even sell services or work for each other because all of them are broke. On a fundamental level a prosperous economy needs the masses of peopel with tons and tons of disposable income. The free market takes it from there as they buy stuff from each other.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Those who realise that for a short while they are on the bottom of the food chain will be fine. They'll knuckle down, learn the job/trade/profession, and progress. Those that don't, will be the next generation of bitter whingers decrying a "system that failed them". They'll probably end up as mods on HPC :rolleyes:

+ 1

Life is hard and then you die. B)

Twas ever thus for most folk.

Never forget that.

Too many around here think 'the system' owes them something (like a house) when of course it owes nothing to no one, never has and never will.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thats a lot of my argument for a massive printing/national dividend.

I see more and more people sitting around broke. They can't even sell services or work for each other because all of them are broke. On a fundamental level a prosperous economy needs the masses of peopel with tons and tons of disposable income. The free market takes it from there as they buy stuff from each other.

+1

I think a 400 million pound Nat Div to each citizen should do the trick

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another problem for the clever clogs is things simply won't get done.

Car companies will go bust and not need car designers, bridges won't be built as no one will have capital to invest in them, computer games won't be designed as people can't fork out the £40+ needed for them etc etc as almost all people get a lot poorer, and start focusing on subsistence needs only.

People are literally going to spend their money on food, utilities and maybe getting pissed, but nothing else.

tisk you're not thinking globally.....

Oh my mistake, you are.

:(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I imagine a lot of people who went into the law thought this way- but now the corporates have embraced automation and outsourcing in their own business's, they are asking their legal eagles why they aren't doing the same, and getting a bit twitchy about being charged massive fees for stuff that could either be computerised or sent off to India.

Legal eagles are less vulnerable than some, because laws (unlike programming languages) are different in different countries. Only people trained in English law are really useful in England and Wales. If you want to give useful legal services in Scotland, then you need to know Scottish Law, which is different. There won't be that many Chinese who learn (and keep up with) English law. Most legal systems are in a constant state of flux - think superinjuntions. :D:lol:

OTOH globalisation is providing its own set of legal challenges/opportunities. So you need lawyers specially trained in international trade law. EU law and its interaction with local law is probably providing lots of lawyers lots of work (especially in commercial law).

A lot of people who claim that no machine could do their job are probably right- but take that job and chop it into smaller segments, throw a lot of computing power at each segment and in many cases they will succeed in automating it.

Even if there are programmers trying to automate the progress - who do you think is advising them? And when the programs are written, another set of programmers (and lawyers) will be trying to find holes in them, and trying to write better ones (think - who's still using the first word processors?) - thereby keeping both programmers and lawyers employed.

The thing about real clever clogs is that they can find a way to make money about out of any situation. The really real clever clogs can find a way to create businesses that will use the skills of the other slightly-less clever clogs.

Just an extra note about people finding ways to make money - to lighten the tone of the debate:

We've all heard by now about the American bloke who'd telling everyone that the world faces the beginning of the End Times with the Rapture happening tomorrow (Sat 21 May) - though he's not committed himself as to the time, nor as to which timezone God will be using to decide when 21st May begins. Still for Rapture believers (who are more numerous than seems likely), someone has provided a service. Some of them have pets, but not enough confidence in God to think that he will look after their pets, should they be raptured:

An atheist and entrepreneur from North Hampshire, Bart Centre, is enjoying a boost in business for Eternal Earth-bound Pets, which he set up to look after the pets of those who believe they will be raptured.

He has more than 250 clients who are paying up to $135 (£83) to have their pets picked up and cared for after the rapture.

They would be disappointed twice, he told the Wall Street Journal. "Once because they weren't raptured and again because I don't do refunds."

("Rapture" apocalyse prediction sparks atheist reaction)

db

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Legal eagles are less vulnerable than some, because laws (unlike programming languages) are different in different countries. Only people trained in English law are really useful in England and Wales. If you want to give useful legal services in Scotland, then you need to know Scottish Law, which is different. There won't be that many Chinese who learn (and keep up with) English law. Most legal systems are in a constant state of flux - think superinjuntions.

I'm sure the top end will be ok- but a lot of the more routine stuff will be outsourced and eventually automated. China is not the threat here- it's India- they are training up a lot of people in UK legal stuff and do see it as a growth area for themselves.

Even if there are programmers trying to automate the progress - who do you think is advising them? And when the programs are written, another set of programmers (and lawyers) will be trying to find holes in them, and trying to write better ones (think - who's still using the first word processors?) - thereby keeping both programmers and lawyers employed.

Accountancy is the model to look to here- you still have the top end specialists but a lot of the routine stuff has been embedded into software that allows cost cutting of staff and salaries. Its hard to see why legal services won't follow a similar path if the clients do start pushing for cheaper services.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yup, this chap is another example of those who just don't get it. It's a pyramid scheme, thus the rewards are much greater at the top than they are for those at the bottom, given the same amount of effort.

There are people now running around photocopying for free, as so-called interns, eventually they will have to

pay for the privilege in the hope of getting a job. In fact, that's kinda what's happening as new graduates find that

their initial degree means nothing and they have to pay for

further education / courses / bits of tatty paper just to get a job (things that their predecessors never had to do, thus tdo not understand).

The point I was making was that graduates have always had to graft. The pole has become narrower and more slippy. This us because people who were previously excluded from competing because they were brown/eastern European etc are now in the Market.

150 years ago the invention of the bicycle allowed people from the next village compete for "our" jobs. No doubt there were people claiming it was the end of civilisation then.

There are more competitors, and people need to lose the idea that life owes them a living. Getting a bit of paper doesn't mean you're on the gravy train, but I'm saying it never did.

Edited by John The Pessimist

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nothing to see here, move along now........This entire thread is a non-story. 15 years ago I graduated and started in a "low skills" job. So did every other graduate I knew, irrespective of the discipline they qualified in. Meds ran for lab results and x-rays, law grads became expert photocopiers, accountancy trainees counted invoices and receipts.

This is only a story because the current generation of media studies grads expect to be editing award winning documentaries the week they come out of college. I see this because I interview graduates regularly. Those who realise that for a short while they are on the bottom of the food chain will be fine. They'll knuckle down, learn the job/trade/profession, and progress. Those that don't, will be the next generation of bitter whingers decrying a "system that failed them". They'll probably end up as mods on HPC :rolleyes:

LOL

Does that include bricklayers getting paid just above NMW, if your lucky enough to find work. Don't forget it takes about 5 years to get up to speed to be able to produce what is required.

Nothing to do with whinging, the system is broken, reset coming. Kabish?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

LOL

Does that include bricklayers getting paid just above NMW, if your lucky enough to find work. Don't forget it takes about 5 years to get up to speed to be able to produce what is required.

Same as coopers complaining that they are now obsolete.

You may well be a very good brickie but there isn't the Market for your skills any more at the price you expect.

**it happens, adapt or fail.

Nothing to do with whinging, the system is broken, reset coming. Kabish?

Edited by John The Pessimist

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jesus.

There isn't a market for much any more, except gaming the system.

That was my point to your stupid comment about learning a trade/profession/ etc and knuckling down.

Erm coppers are in demand, there's just no money to pay them.

The fundamentals are Pete Tong.

Kabish?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • 317 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.