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More Graduates Taking Low-Skill Jobs - Report

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That is the key point. It starts well before you get to university - too many lazy people in this country (I see it among my younger relatives) thinking just getting a degree is enough. Work hard at school, get a good degree in a 'hard' subject from a good university and the world's your oyster. I don't know anyone who has done that who is working in a low-skilled job today.

That's only because they are a few steps up the pyramid and are yet to feel the heat. I know, I am one, I am having a brilliant life but I'm not so blind that I can't see what's about to happen.

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the report is absolutely pointless. its simply a case that there are more graduates than ever.

a degree is just a qualification, it doesnt guarantee a new job will be created for them.

if everyone got a degree, the number of jobs would be the same. at the end of the day its the same people chasing the same jobs, but its just that more of them are graduates now.

nothing has changed.

Yes

Very well put.

Obvious really though.

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That's only because they are a few steps up the pyramid and are yet to feel the heat. I know, I am one, I am having a bril highliant life but I'm not so blind that I can't see what's about to happen.

Thats true - there are many people up the ladder who have never felt any real heat - many management teams in companies are like musical chairs with them rotating every few years to another highly paid job - and trying to keep out those below from getting promoted.

The problem with more Graduates, and better exam grades is more competition - just having a more educated workforce will not create more jobs -

I think many graduates today are squeezed with

high house prices,

difficulty getting mortgages,

more student debt than students of 80s and 90s, salaries

Pretty dismal salaries, or sometimes good if your in right field.

extreme competition often for crap jobs

Overall GCSE, A Level higher grade requirements

Yet at the same time there expected to be Love the job, love to company, slave away and put all that down for being "good for there experience", and be a good little cheery graduate slave with lots of potential.

How many of todays graduates will end up bitter disillusioned debt ridden 30 somethings - with no real skills other than shuffling paper around an office

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Problem is too many graduates and/or not enough graduate jobs, the system was designed for the top 10% (academics) to go to unversity not 50%+

I sense there is an agenda of sorts amongst some of the present government to eliminate some of that competition- the traditional advantage the middle classes had was their ability to effectively use their wealth to purchase better life chances for their kids- the current glut of graduates has muddied this water considerably- hence the call for more 'tradesmen' and less graduates (Though, of course, these tradesmen will not be the children of the middle class)

Sadly even if a way is found to filter out the more aspirational kids of the lower orders- via high fees- this will not return the status quo, because the real competition in future will be coming from the graduates of China and India- a competing group less easy to eliminate.

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Work hard at school, get a good degree in a 'hard' subject from a good university and the world's your oyster. I don't know anyone who has done that who is working in a low-skilled job today.

Selection bias? Just because there are none in your network doesn't mean they don't exist.

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At this point in time, we just don't need graduates. We need obedient worker drones.

Perhaps the really interesting question is; what to do with the people we don't need at all?

Our entire system is based on the idea that people will work and thus gain access to the goods and services they need to survive- but we have been busily developing all sorts of 'labour saving' technologies designed to eliminate that work- leaving some people with no means to survive unless supported by others- who then resent being made to support them.

Combine this with a 'winner takes all' style of capitalism and it's hard to see how the benign future we were promised comes about- if anything we look like heading into a social abyss where the have nots are increasingly marginalised leading to ever more repressive measures to contain them.

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Perhaps the really interesting question is; what to do with the people we don't need at all?

Our entire system is based on the idea that people will work and thus gain access to the goods and services they need to survive- but we have been busily developing all sorts of 'labour saving' technologies designed to eliminate that work- leaving some people with no means to survive unless supported by others- who then resent being made to support them.

Combine this with a 'winner takes all' style of capitalism and it's hard to see how the benign future we were promised comes about- if anything we look like heading into a social abyss where the have nots are increasingly marginalised leading to ever more repressive measures to contain them.

I entirely agree. I'm sick of being made to work like a dog in a sweat shop because the company I work for has cut admin staff to the bone meaning I do a lot of my own admin and tasks of a lower skill level as well as the actual job I'm supposed to do. I don't mean this to sound like some "that work is beneath me" comment, it's just financially not viable to have someone of my salary doing it, but that is what happens, and so because of increased costs because of my decreased output they cut back further on other admin areas. On the spreadsheet the beancounter thought it was cheaper, yet they are surprised by the figures at the end of the year when reality doesn't match their theory. I'd much rather people of my grade take a pay cut AND a large percentage of the middle management bureaucracy stop worrying about if I've compeleted my timesheet, grab a spade, and get shovelling on the front line with me AND the directors stop pocketing ludicruous bonus's like kiddies in a sweatshop. Everybody would get a much better work / life balance and more jobs would be created and society would be much nicer. Incidentally, I think Directors of PLC's bonus's should be x multiples of the average bonus paid to everyone in the company and their company funded pension arrangements should be in the same as everyone elses (no Fred Goodwin special pensions).

It's ludicrous to have some people working 50+ hours a week so they pay enough tax to pay for others to work none with no medical reason. Even taking into account skill differences there's generally admin functions of peoples job that they could jettison so that the short supply highly skilled can reduce their hours also. I believe most people would like a job, just one that they see a noticeable benefit from doing and not our current setup of taking an income cut to leave benefits for a NMW job which is obviously a major barrier.

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so you'd need to buckle down from about 14 and gear everything to passing the exams with top-flight marks.

There's the problem though. I was still building things with Lego when I was 14, not considering career choices (thinking about, I still build stuff with Lego these days too). My careers advice at school was absolutely useless - put some numbers into a BBC Micro to be told that despite my skinny frame I was suitable to be a fireman. The teacher running the session then said something along the lines of I'd make it to uni so I'd be fine any way :blink:

Edited by rantnrave

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There's the problem though. I was still building things with Lego when I was 14, not considering career choices (thinking about, I still build stuff with Lego these days too). My careers advice at school was absolutely useless - put some numbers into a BBC Micro to be told that despite my skinny frame I was suitable to be a fireman. The teacher running the session then said something along the lines of I'd make it to uni so I'd be fine any way :blink:

Unfortunately that's the sign of pyramid ponzi schemes. The tough life keeps filtering downwards in order to (unsuccessfully) keep the ones at the top going.

http://www.globalvolunteerprojects.org/index.htm''>http://www.globalvolunteerprojects.org/index.htm' rel="external nofollow">'>http://www.globalvolunteerprojects.org/index.htm

This is what is required now to stand a decent change of competing just for a bloody uni place. Look at how much it costs.

On and on it goes until one day it collapses.

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There's the problem though. I was still building things with Lego when I was 14, not considering career choices (thinking about, I still build stuff with Lego these days too). My careers advice at school was absolutely useless - put some numbers into a BBC Micro to be told that despite my skinny frame I was suitable to be a fireman. The teacher running the session then said something along the lines of I'd make it to uni so I'd be fine any way :blink:

Exactly, this could increase the amount of young people making bad career choices, not decrease them.

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A consequence of this is that the less educated have fewer jobs to apply for?

Well not really.They are probably ahead of the graduates in the queue for these low skilled jobs because employers will think the graduates are just waiting for a better job to come along that more suits their qualifications.

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Unfortunately that's the sign of pyramid ponzi schemes. The tough life keeps filtering downwards in order to (unsuccessfully) keep the ones at the top going.

http://www.globalvolunteerprojects.org/index.htm''>http://www.globalvolunteerprojects.org/index.htm' rel="external nofollow">'>http://www.globalvolunteerprojects.org/index.htm

This is what is required now to stand a decent change of competing just for a bloody uni place. Look at how much it costs.

On and on it goes until one day it collapses.

Work at a Ghana TV station.

Sounds horrible , maybe if you wanted to be raped (for women) and have people beat you and steal your wallet because they think you are a rich white guy then go for it i guess.

EDIT : Just looked at the site more.So you pay 1000 pounds to Stay in Ghana for one month doing volunteer (ie unpaid) work in a TV station or orphanage and that 1000 pounds doesn't even cover the airfare to go there.What the fuÇk??

Edited by Ruffneck

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EDIT : Just looked at the site more.So you pay 1000 pounds to Stay in Ghana for one month doing volunteer (ie unpaid) work in a TV station or orphanage and that 1000 pounds doesn't even cover the airfare to go there.What the fuÇk??

Yes. Do you get it now?

This is what's going on. It's getting worse. Like any ponzi pyramid, everyone is scrambling to keep it from tottering over, using more and more fiendish devices.

It only makes the final crash / revolution much much more painful.

We are all going to feel the heat one way or another.

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The economy became so unbalanced and this also reflected in the labour market. He'd abolished boom and bust after all!

Remember it had become so speculative that it made 'sense' not to work too hard; buy a place at 100% LTV, work a bit and wait for the house prices to rise.

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I sense there is an agenda of sorts amongst some of the present government to eliminate some of that competition- the traditional advantage the middle classes had was their ability to effectively use their wealth to purchase better life chances for their kids- the current glut of graduates has muddied this water considerably- hence the call for more 'tradesmen' and less graduates (Though, of course, these tradesmen will not be the children of the middle class)

Sadly even if a way is found to filter out the more aspirational kids of the lower orders- via high fees- this will not return the status quo, because the real competition in future will be coming from the graduates of China and India- a competing group less easy to eliminate.

You are so convinced that the other side are evil that you see monsters where there are none.

The majority opinion even on HPC is that the education system has become unbalanced, churning out lots of graduates with effectively useless degrees. The government happens to agree, and has come to the obvious conclusion that more vocational places would be a good thing. This isn't really that controversial, and had we not got used to laughable government incompetence over the last decade, it shouldn't be at all surprising. You however suspect a secret right-wing conspiracy. :ph34r:

Where the current government is open to criticism is in having a good plan, and yet letting the problem drift on without taking decisive action. This is presumably because they are trying to avoid fighting on too many fronts at once, which is a shame. It really ought to possible to reform tertiary education right now, delaying inevitable change only condemns 1000s more to debt and wasted opportunity.

Edited by the shaping machine

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When I was at school (only several years ago) - Everything was drilled towards what University are you going to, what course are you going to do, all the careers meetings I went to pretty much focuses on the same thing too.

Looking back on it I think it was pretty awful as University just isn't required or necessary for most jobs and I wish I'd been a bit more 'world savvy' before hand because ultimately I've wasted a few years of my life in terms of career/education in my finally chosen field.

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I entirely agree. I'm sick of being made to work like a dog in a sweat shop because the company I work for has cut admin staff to the bone meaning I do a lot of my own admin and tasks of a lower skill level as well as the actual job I'm supposed to do. I don't mean this to sound like some "that work is beneath me" comment, it's just financially not viable to have someone of my salary doing it, but that is what happens, and so because of increased costs because of my decreased output they cut back further on other admin areas. On the spreadsheet the beancounter thought it was cheaper, yet they are surprised by the figures at the end of the year when reality doesn't match their theory. I'd much rather people of my grade take a pay cut AND a large percentage of the middle management bureaucracy stop worrying about if I've compeleted my timesheet, grab a spade, and get shovelling on the front line with me AND the directors stop pocketing ludicruous bonus's like kiddies in a sweatshop. Everybody would get a much better work / life balance and more jobs would be created and society would be much nicer. Incidentally, I think Directors of PLC's bonus's should be x multiples of the average bonus paid to everyone in the company and their company funded pension arrangements should be in the same as everyone elses (no Fred Goodwin special pensions).

It's ludicrous to have some people working 50+ hours a week so they pay enough tax to pay for others to work none with no medical reason. Even taking into account skill differences there's generally admin functions of peoples job that they could jettison so that the short supply highly skilled can reduce their hours also. I believe most people would like a job, just one that they see a noticeable benefit from doing and not our current setup of taking an income cut to leave benefits for a NMW job which is obviously a major barrier.

+1

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There's the problem though. I was still building things with Lego when I was 14, not considering career choices (thinking about, I still build stuff with Lego these days too). My careers advice at school was absolutely useless - put some numbers into a BBC Micro to be told that despite my skinny frame I was suitable to be a fireman. The teacher running the session then said something along the lines of I'd make it to uni so I'd be fine any way :blink:

Unfortunately young man, you will now have to compete with people who were focused driven teenagers (from all over the world) when you grow up so you'd better buckle down and work now !! It will be too late when you wake up at 30 years old and find you only have skills to work in the fast food sector B).

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Thing is, they'll already have three stars by the time you turn up for induction.

I've never worked in food or retail, explain?

Is this something to do with Mc-status, chain of Mc-command when you work there?

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  • 294 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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