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Inflation Fears On Rising Clothes Prices

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http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/economics/8498879/Inflation-fears-resurface-on-rising-clothes-prices.html

Clothing and textile prices rose by 4.6pc as core producer price inflation – which strips out volatile food and energy prices – soared to its highest level since September last year, at 3.4pc.

The pound rebounded from recent falls against the dollar on expectations that the Bank of England will have to address inflation by raising rates as soon as it considers the economy sufficiently resilient.

The cost of goods at factory gates rose by 0.8pc in April, the Office for National Statistics said, above expectations of 0.7pc. However, the 0.6pc month-on-month increase in core output prices was double the consensus forecast – indicating that rising costs are spreading across the economy.

"With much of this increase stemming from clothing, it indicates that retailers will face difficult pricing decisions as they balance higher costs with weak consumer spending," Andrew Grantham at HSBC said.

Input prices have risen 17.6pc on an annual basis, the ONS found, and output prices just 5.3pc – a small decline from the upwardly revised 5.6pc in March but still above forecasts. The sharp rise in input prices was a reflection of higher oil prices.

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http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/economics/8498879/Inflation-fears-resurface-on-rising-clothes-prices.html

Clothing and textile prices rose by 4.6pc as core producer price inflation – which strips out volatile food and energy prices – soared to its highest level since September last year, at 3.4pc.

The pound rebounded from recent falls against the dollar on expectations that the Bank of England will have to address inflation by raising rates as soon as it considers the economy sufficiently resilient.

The cost of goods at factory gates rose by 0.8pc in April, the Office for National Statistics said, above expectations of 0.7pc. However, the 0.6pc month-on-month increase in core output prices was double the consensus forecast – indicating that rising costs are spreading across the economy.

"With much of this increase stemming from clothing, it indicates that retailers will face difficult pricing decisions as they balance higher costs with weak consumer spending," Andrew Grantham at HSBC said.

Input prices have risen 17.6pc on an annual basis, the ONS found, and output prices just 5.3pc – a small decline from the upwardly revised 5.6pc in March but still above forecasts. The sharp rise in input prices was a reflection of higher oil prices.

All their forecasts are shit. All the Bankrupt fo England's forescasts are shit - more likely they are just a pack of lies deisgned to try and fool the public into accepting their bank saving / bonus making /boe pension inflating polcies.

What doesn't lie is what is left in the back pocket of the consumer and the balance sheet of the company.

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Most adults buy clothing on a whim, due to change of fashion rather than utility.

Rising prices for clothing will have limited effects, as they are easily mitigated. A few of the high street retailers like M&S will probably suffer though.

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What doesn't lie is what is left in the back pocket of the consumer and the balance sheet of the company.

As the last 10 years have shown the use of "off balance sheet" and consumer credit mean that both of those things lie as well! ;)

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Most adults buy clothing on a whim, due to change of fashion rather than utility.

I don't know.. Our toddler needs new clothes constantly ( due to wear + growing )

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I don't get it other than for children and babies why is there such a need to buy so many clothes?

I managed to not buy clothes for years.... hell I even have some shirts from highschool which still fit me when I'm sub 10 stone.

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Next have upped their prices 10% this year, going for another bumper pay packet for 2011?

Remuneration increases 2010 from 2009

S A Wolfson £831k to £1.7m (+109%)

C E Angelides £585k to £980k (+67%)

D W Keens £560k to £936k (+67%)

A J Varley £423k to £789k (+86%)

http://www.nextplc.co.uk/nextplc/financialinfo/reportsresults/2009/jan10/jan10-c.pdf

2011 from 2010 wasn't as good, the excesses of 2010 were merely maintained

Simon Wolfson £1.74m to £1.76m (£689,000 salary but a £1,034,000 bonus!)

Christos Angelides £980k to £1.03m

David Keens £936k to £948k

Andrew Varley £789k to £746k (a minus!)

http://www.investis.com/nxplc/docs/ar2011.pdf

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As the last 10 years have shown the use of "off balance sheet" and consumer credit mean that both of those things lie as well! ;)

True, but that lie gets found out. Same as the US "recovery" where the tarp slush funded car manufacturers are using this money to make their sales look good by selling at a price that they wouldn;t normally be able to. This will get exposedin the not too distant at which point they do what - go tapping the taxpayer for more of the same?

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There are not many fibres used in the textile industry that aren't either heavily treated with or fully comprised of oil derivatives.

Armed with that information, it is pretty obvious that oil prices are linked to the cost of textiles.

Oh well, there are plenty of perfectly good kids cloths across the nations charity shops.

And some good stuff for you and the missus as well, if you can live with the 'shame' that somebody else's bottom may have inhabited the trousers before you.

As an aside, about 99.9% of the things we use or consume every day are made possible by oil derivatives.

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As an aside, about 99.9% of the things we use or consume every day are made possible by oil derivatives.

I got a really old duster which is apparently traditionally made in a traditional manner i.e. using urine in the tannery to condition the leather. I don't wear it so much but I do condition it to keep it supple every so often.

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I got a really old duster which is apparently traditionally made in a traditional manner i.e. using urine in the tannery to condition the leather. I don't wear it so much but I do condition it to keep it supple every so often.

Why and how would you wear a duster? Do you mean feather? I've never heard of a leather duster.I supposed wearing leather soaked in piss might be an interesting kink.

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I got a really old duster which is apparently traditionally made in a traditional manner i.e. using urine in the tannery to condition the leather. I don't wear it so much but I do condition it to keep it supple every so often.

I have a mate in Canada who once very unfortunately lived near a tannery. That has to be one of the most awful pungent smells, possible worse than a rendering plant, and definitely much worse than a cheesery.

But yes, urine has a lot of practical uses.

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I don't know.. Our toddler needs new clothes constantly ( due to wear + growing )

That's why I said adults...

Baby clothes are dirt-cheap from supermarkets, or charity shops. I've only spent about £20 on clothes for our 7 month old, the rest has been given to us, either new clothes that are gifts or second hand stuff from neighbours whose kids have grown out of it.

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True, but that lie gets found out. Same as the US "recovery" where the tarp slush funded car manufacturers are using this money to make their sales look good by selling at a price that they wouldn;t normally be able to. This will get exposedin the not too distant at which point they do what - go tapping the taxpayer for more of the same?

Eventually it get's exposed, but as many FTSE 100 companies show, eventually can be up to 20 years!

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I bought 2 pairs of jeans from ASDA for £4 each the other day.

Anyone who pays more than £10 for a pair of jeans is a mug IMO.

:blink:

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I bought 2 pairs of jeans from ASDA for £4 each the other day.

Anyone who pays more than £10 for a pair of jeans is a mug IMO.

:blink:

And here you are talking about China and India not becoming economically superior on the other threads.

Check the tag in your jeans.

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And here you are talking about China and India not becoming economically superior on the other threads.

Check the tag in your jeans.

You don't became a superpower by selling £4 jeans

that are made by child slave labour

http://ihscslnews.org/view_article.php?id=57

What happens when people in China and India demand a better life?

Neither of these countries will be global superpowers for hundreds of years, if ever.

:blink:

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You don't became a superpower by selling £4 jeans

that are made by child slave labour

http://ihscslnews.or...ticle.php?id=57

What happens when people in China and India demand a better life?

Neither of these countries will be global superpowers for hundreds of years, if ever.

:blink:

Computer says 'no'.

What we need is a 'quality' index for clothing rather than an 'inflation' index.

It would clearly show top left to bottom right trending rapidly to zero.

I hope NEXT go bust, they certainly deserve to.

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so anyone who buys jeans not made by child slave labour is a mug in your opinion?

And if I didn't buy the jeans these kids would starve.

And this is why neither China or India can be classes as superpowers

And why they never will be.

:blink:

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You don't became a superpower by selling £4 jeans

that are made by child slave labour

http://ihscslnews.org/view_article.php?id=57

What happens when people in China and India demand a better life?

Neither of these countries will be global superpowers for hundreds of years, if ever.

:blink:

America became a world superpower using slave labour and European money to very quickly build its infrastructure, this was boost they needed to kick England out of the colony and gain their independence.

Other than the epoch, how are things different in your mind?

You know nothing of empire it seems.

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Computer says 'no'.

What we need is a 'quality' index for clothing rather than an 'inflation' index.

It would clearly show top left to bottom right trending rapidly to zero.

I hope NEXT go bust, they certainly deserve to.

They are a socialist state - so they are constantly 'bust'

At some point the people in China will try to get democracy

and when that happens the country will descend into chaos and another few hundred million will starve - sadly.

Lots of people does not necessarily equal superpower.

China's population was 400 million hundreds of years ago

Were they a global superpower then? - No.

And they are not one now either.

:blink:

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Snapped up a bargain of a beautiful 100% cotton pair of lined long curtains for a fiver at the charity shop the other day...perfect condition...there are many options on what you could do with them. ;)

Edited by winkie

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