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Calling All Motorcycle License Holders

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I decided to buy a 125cc motorbike in February for a 10 mile commute (each way) to work to save money and wear and tear on the car. I'm saving loads on petrol and really enjoy riding, but feel the need for a bigger bike, even just a step up to a 250cc. I was wondering what's the best way to gain a license, is there a need for lessons? Can you arrange to do everything yourself or do you need to go through a school?

Are there any riders out there who could give me their opinion/experience of the best/cheapest/quickest way of obtaining a full motorcycle license - as I said,just for a 250cc. Any advice appreciated.

Cheers.

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I decided to buy a 125cc motorbike in February for a 10 mile commute (each way) to work to save money and wear and tear on the car. I'm saving loads on petrol and really enjoy riding, but feel the need for a bigger bike, even just a step up to a 250cc. I was wondering what's the best way to gain a license, is there a need for lessons? Can you arrange to do everything yourself or do you need to go through a school?

Are there any riders out there who could give me their opinion/experience of the best/cheapest/quickest way of obtaining a full motorcycle license - as I said,just for a 250cc. Any advice appreciated.

Cheers.

Mate of mine got his license in a week or two on an intensive course - probably the best way to do it. Got my license years ago when it was a lot easier.

Sounds like you've got the bug though, you won't stop at a 250. My current bike costs as much to run as the car.

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If you are over 21 (which I assume you are) then to ride anything over 125cc you'll need to do the Direct Access course.

If you don't do that you'll be stuck on 125s for around 2 years I believe.

First you need to do the CBT (Basic training), this is compulsory and can take anywhere from a day to several, after this you can then ride on the road (not dual carriageways) and you cannot carry passengers.

As with anything practice makes perfect, as mentioned above you can get 1 or 2 week intensive courses which loan you a bike. I would be careful it is much easier to ride your own bike (I.E. Buy one) than ride a crappy one from the school.

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If you are over 21 (which I assume you are) then to ride anything over 125cc you'll need to do the Direct Access course.

If you don't do that you'll be stuck on 125s for around 2 years I believe.

First you need to do the CBT (Basic training), this is compulsory and can take anywhere from a day to several, after this you can then ride on the road (not dual carriageways) and you cannot carry passengers.

As with anything practice makes perfect, as mentioned above you can get 1 or 2 week intensive courses which loan you a bike. I would be careful it is much easier to ride your own bike (I.E. Buy one) than ride a crappy one from the school.

I'd prefer to drop theirs than mine.

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If you are over 21 (which I assume you are) then to ride anything over 125cc you'll need to do the Direct Access course.

If you don't do that you'll be stuck on 125s for around 2 years I believe.

First you need to do the CBT (Basic training), this is compulsory and can take anywhere from a day to several, after this you can then ride on the road (not dual carriageways) and you cannot carry passengers.

As with anything practice makes perfect, as mentioned above you can get 1 or 2 week intensive courses which loan you a bike. I would be careful it is much easier to ride your own bike (I.E. Buy one) than ride a crappy one from the school.

Can't edit, but you need to re-do your theory test as well.

CBT and Theory certificates are valid for 2 years from the date you pass.

That is about it I reckon.

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Mate of mine got his license in a week or two on an intensive course - probably the best way to do it. Got my license years ago when it was a lot easier.

Sounds like you've got the bug though, you won't stop at a 250. My current bike costs as much to run as the car.

I think you're right, and will probably be the dilemma I will face, but for now I keep telling myself that a 250 will be just enough with good mpg. The CBR125 feels great, until I'm blown out the way by a real bike!

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do a proper course and pass a test . it will teach you things you dont know now and possibly save your life , the basic bike cbt does not show you alot, only that you can ride around some cones and stop ! that said you could be a very good rider , the police also used to offer some advanced rider skills once you passed your proper test, any training is better than none . a 250 is a different ballgame to 125 unless you as say you are a commuter......no point being an organ donor. ride offroad no traffic and your all goin in the same direction....usually. happy riding :)

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I did a Direct Access course a few years ago. I hadn't ridden at all before hand, did my CBT and then upgrade to 500 CC bike and test all in 5 days and passed first time. It's not unusual to do so, and as someone who drives and has riding experience of a few months you'd probably walk through a Direct Access course even easier than I did.

I'm ashamed to say I haven't ridden since the day I passed my test though, due to not owning a house with a garage where I can keep a bike! (which brings us seamlessly back to house prices... ;) )

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If you are over 21 (which I assume you are) then to ride anything over 125cc you'll need to do the Direct Access course.

If you don't do that you'll be stuck on 125s for around 2 years I believe.

First you need to do the CBT (Basic training), this is compulsory and can take anywhere from a day to several, after this you can then ride on the road (not dual carriageways) and you cannot carry passengers.

As with anything practice makes perfect, as mentioned above you can get 1 or 2 week intensive courses which loan you a bike. I would be careful it is much easier to ride your own bike (I.E. Buy one) than ride a crappy one from the school.

I did a CBT but it is only valid for 2 years - which is a complete pain in the **** IMO.

If the government wants to save the planet, surely they should be encouraging people to use motorcycles.

And IMO it is dangerous limiting people to 30 mph on 40 mph roads which is why I wanted to use a 125 instead of a 50cc, however, as I said the CBT is time limited so when I discovered this I stuck with my moped.

You will need a license to breathe shortly.

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If you are over 21 (which I assume you are) then to ride anything over 125cc you'll need to do the Direct Access course.

If you don't do that you'll be stuck on 125s for around 2 years I believe.

First you need to do the CBT (Basic training), this is compulsory and can take anywhere from a day to several, after this you can then ride on the road (not dual carriageways) and you cannot carry passengers.

As with anything practice makes perfect, as mentioned above you can get 1 or 2 week intensive courses which loan you a bike. I would be careful it is much easier to ride your own bike (I.E. Buy one) than ride a crappy one from the school.

Yes, I'm over 21, got a 125CBR, have a CBT, aware of the theory test and 2 practical modules,just not sure what's the best/cheapest way to get a full license.

Riding is definitely something I want to do, so like you said, would have to do the CBT in 2 years anyway again,so might as well do the real thing.

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I did a Direct Access course a few years ago. I hadn't ridden at all before hand, did my CBT and then upgrade to 500 CC bike and test all in 5 days and passed first time. It's not unusual to do so, and as someone who drives and has riding experience of a few months you'd probably walk through a Direct Access course even easier than I did.

I'm ashamed to say I haven't ridden since the day I passed my test though, due to not owning a house with a garage where I can keep a bike! (which brings us seamlessly back to house prices... ;) )

Cheers, how much did it cost back then? Was it 5 consecutive days? Were you able to go straight onto a 500?

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It is 10 years since I did mine, so it has all changed. But here goes. If I would you I would contact a motorcycle training school and find out what you need to do. From memory if you want to be able to ride any bike after passing then you have to take the test on a decent sized bike i.e not a 125. So if you want to do this buying your own large bike may not be an option because you could not ride it on the road unless under instruction.

So for me the main issue I had was getting used to the larger bike for the test i.e turns and keeping the bike under control at a slow speed (which are required to pass the test).

You may only need one or two sessions with an instructor to get these right and to make sure you get the tips and tricks correct like making a very visible nod to the mirrors so the tester knows you are looking in the mirrors.

Also the tester clocks if you turn up to the test with an instructor because they all know each other, the biking brotherhood, my tester was an ex motorcycle cop and much, much more friendly than the car tester I had.

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I did a CBT but it is only valid for 2 years - which is a complete pain in the **** IMO.

If the government wants to save the planet, surely they should be encouraging people to use motorcycles.

And IMO it is dangerous limiting people to 30 mph on 40 mph roads which is why I wanted to use a 125 instead of a 50cc, however, as I said the CBT is time limited so when I discovered this I stuck with my moped.

You will need a license to breathe shortly.

Same here, got the 125 for exact same reasons, especially when most of the roads I use are 50 limit.

Couldn't agree more about the planet thing - even questioned this with my employer when they introduced some ride to work scheme last month, but apparently that only applies to riding without a motor!

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Yes, I'm over 21, got a 125CBR, have a CBT, aware of the theory test and 2 practical modules,just not sure what's the best/cheapest way to get a full license.

Riding is definitely something I want to do, so like you said, would have to do the CBT in 2 years anyway again,so might as well do the real thing.

Apologies, I re-read.

When my mate did the week intensive it cost him £500 for 500cc. That was for everything (bar the tests).

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I think you're right, and will probably be the dilemma I will face, but for now I keep telling myself that a 250 will be just enough with good mpg. The CBR125 feels great, until I'm blown out the way by a real bike!

Never enough, on a nice sunny day fine a nice straight piece of road with no side roads, start in first, twist the throttle straight back and go through the gears, great fun almost as good as corners.

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Gods breath it's got complicated since I did it. Best of luck to you and I hope you enjoy your future bikes. It really is worth the effort.

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Apologies, I re-read.

When my mate did the week intensive it cost him £500 for 500cc. That was for everything (bar the tests).

its more like 1000 -1200 quid when you factor in the week off as well but imho its money well spent , as a commuter with cheaper fuel , insurance , servicing and road tax you will get your money back in 1-2 years but the fun you can have with a few mates in the summer is pricele :) ss !

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Also the tester clocks if you turn up to the test with an instructor because they all know each other, the biking brotherhood, my tester was an ex motorcycle cop and much, much more friendly than the car tester I had.

Direct Access for me nearly 13years ago. Instructor was an ex bike cop who bizarrely would tell me over the radio the best way to win the chase and something like the golden 6minutes to get away before the police helicopter closed in.

I passed first time at 21 after 4 days (including 1 day CBT), plus two hours on the morning of the test... before that I had never ridden a bike. Cost about £600 in all. Couldn't get insured for the first few years on my bike of choice (GSXR600) unti I hit 23 years old, went to the showroom, bought new and rode off into the sunset (dropping it loads, including the ride home lol as I was pretty much learning from scratch again).

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Never enough, on a nice sunny day fine a nice straight piece of road with no side roads, start in first, twist the throttle straight back and go through the gears, great fun almost as good as corners.

Straight line jockey :P

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Simply wait a few months I forget the date, but the two part motorbike test is being abandoned, where you have to do Mod 1 which is a stupid off road test in a purpose built centre. It is instead being reverted back to the old style test. Where an examiner follows you on a bike or in a car and asks you to perform set exercises:

Engine off U turn

U turn

Emergency stop

The reason being IIRC was that the MOD1 test centres were too sparse and it ramped the cost of tests up a great deal.

Secondly a lot of people were being hurt on the swerve and brake test as well as failing due to a stupid rule, for the brake and swerve tests. The 50km rule, which meant you had to be going EXACTLY 31mph and do the swerve or brake test.

You go over 31mph = you fail

You go under 31mph = you fail

Even if you did everything else competently. The figure of 8, the slalom bit and slow speed riding feet up.

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That sounds harsh.

Why? Are the saddles uncomfortable or something?

Fascinating thread.

Being a wrinkly, I passed my test on a bike years ago. Actually, the day I was sixteen. As far as I know, I'm still entitled to ride a bike . . . as well as a three wheeler and an agricultural tractor and some road rolling equipment. . that's how it worked in the sixties. Hmmmm . . maybe I should check. I was just thinking of buying a vintage scooter or antique motorbike/sidecar . . . never occurred to me that my credentials might be out of date.

I can remember taking my bike test on a 250cc machine in thick fog . . . the examiner guy stepped out into the road for the emergency stop test. He was damn lucky I saw him in time :lol:

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Everyone I know that has gone into biking in the last 2 years or so has been hit with horrible insurance costs.

How are everyone elses? My car insurance is bad enough I hadn't even bothered to look at a bike because of this reason.

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I decided to buy a 125cc motorbike in February for a 10 mile commute (each way) to work to save money and wear and tear on the car. I'm saving loads on petrol and really enjoy riding, but feel the need for a bigger bike, even just a step up to a 250cc. I was wondering what's the best way to gain a license, is there a need for lessons? Can you arrange to do everything yourself or do you need to go through a school?

Are there any riders out there who could give me their opinion/experience of the best/cheapest/quickest way of obtaining a full motorcycle license - as I said,just for a 250cc. Any advice appreciated.

Cheers.

Maybe think about an old Honda 400 like a CB-1 ?

A nice amount of power for a newbie, light weight, nice handling and bullet proof Honda reliability. Plus it's cheap to run, insure and tax.

Wish i'd kept mine :(

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  • 312 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

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