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The Masked Tulip

Gavin Esler Asks Vince Cable On Newsnight..

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Ex Labour stooge stating that some 'experts' think UK house prices have to drop 40% to get to long term affordable levels.

Funny I never heard much of that when they were in power.

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Did they really mention 40%???? Am I dreaming to hear that question asked on a BBC News programme?

Almost 11pm on Newsnight. There is a reason this sort of chat is never heard on the News at 6.

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Watching this with the misses and she said "so there really is was a property bubble?". I swear some people only believe stuff once its been aired by the BBC or is at least on TV.

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It's a good question!

Now if only someone would tell us what the answer was...actually, I can pretty much guess.

He evaded, or rather, just flat out refused to answer a direct question about the possibility of a correction in the housing market. He said something about not wanting to make 'predictions'.

He admitted there had been a housing bubble but referred to it in past tense, the interviewer jumped in and pointed out that we're still in the housing bubble and that there hadn't been a correction (or words to that effect) and made reference to a recent article in The Economist. Cable then made a very weak and vague statement about there being some deflation in the housing market.

The panel debate that followed the interview was very interesting. I'm not familiar with the panel members but I think it was an economist, an ex CEO of Asda and a Lord (??) so far as I could tell they were all non-partisan but all very bearish. When answering a question specifically about the housing market the Lord pointed out that the OECD rate the UK property market as 40% overvalued.

Edited by monstermunch

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He evaded, or rather, just flat out refused to answer a direct question about the possibility of a correction in the housing market.

He admitted there had been a housing bubble but referred to it in past tense, the interviewer jumped in at this pointed out that we're still in the housing bubble and that there hadn't been a correction (or words to that effect). Cable then made a very weak and vague statement about there being some deflation in the housing market.

The panel debate that followed the interview was very interesting. I'm not familiar with the panel members but I think it was an economist, an ex CEO of Asda and a Lord (??) so far as I could tell they were all quite non-partisan but all very bearish. When answering a question specifically about the housing market the Lord pointed out that the OECD rate the UK property market as 40% overvalued.

The VI`s are starting to panic, sheeple have believed too hard, they really are holding out, they want their house to be worth "lots", they won`t allow the market to move, this is now pissing into other parts of the economy, and f*ucking things up for vi`s who sold property four years ago.

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The VI`s are starting to panic, sheeple have believed too hard, they really are holding out, they want their house to be worth "lots", they won`t allow the market to move, this is now pissing into other parts of the economy, and f*ucking things up for vi`s who sold property four years ago.

Availability:

Sorry, this programme is not available to watch again.

cant seem to watch it.

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Availability:

Sorry, this programme is not available to watch again.

cant seem to watch it.

trickle the news out, don`t want too big a stampede, but they want sheeple who bought a long time ago to be less greedy so new sheeple can get some debt.

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He evaded, or rather, just flat out refused to answer a direct question about the possibility of a correction in the housing market. He said something about not wanting to make 'predictions'.

He admitted there had been a housing bubble but referred to it in past tense, the interviewer jumped in and pointed out that we're still in the housing bubble and that there hadn't been a correction (or words to that effect) and made reference to a recent article in The Economist. Cable then made a very weak and vague statement about there being some deflation in the housing market.

The panel debate that followed the interview was very interesting. I'm not familiar with the panel members but I think it was an economist, an ex CEO of Asda and a Lord (??) so far as I could tell they were all non-partisan but all very bearish. When answering a question specifically about the housing market the Lord pointed out that the OECD rate the UK property market as 40% overvalued.

Vince proved two things.

Firstly, he is not the economics guru that many here thought him to be and secondly, that power alters every politician beyond recognition meaning that you never get what you thought you were voting for.

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  • 312 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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