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mattyfc

Uk Retail Sales

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http://www.statistics.gov.uk/pdfdir/rs0411.pdf

The seasonally adjusted value of retail sales in March 2011 rose by 4.5 per cent compared with

March 2010.

The seasonally adjusted volume of retail sales in March 2011 rose by 1.3 per cent compared with

March 2010.

More unexpected data, forecast was for -0.5%. This and the trade figures bode well for Q1 GDP

Rate rise back on the table?

Edited by mattyfc

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http://www.statistics.gov.uk/pdfdir/rs0411.pdf

More unexpected data, forecast was for -0.5%. This and the trade figures bode well for Q1 GDP

Rate rise back on the table?

Dunno about that. These figures are too complex to extrapolate a simple statement such as that above. Page 6 showes a different picture - more retailers experienced a drop in March turnover Y.O.Y. than a rise. And internet trading showed 10% growth, much of which would have been at the expense of the High St.

I'm a High St. retailer, and a member of local Chamber of Commerce, and anecdotal evidence from other retailers throughout the West Country would say that March was nothing to write home about.

As Mark Twain - "Lies, d*mn lies and ... "

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Dunno about that. These figures are too complex to extrapolate a simple statement such as that above. Page 6 showes a different picture - more retailers experienced a drop in March turnover Y.O.Y. than a rise. And internet trading showed 10% growth, much of which would have been at the expense of the High St.

I'm a High St. retailer, and a member of local Chamber of Commerce, and anecdotal evidence from other retailers throughout the West Country would say that March was nothing to write home about.

As Mark Twain - "Lies, d*mn lies and ... "

....they need to act fast if they want to save the high street the local small traders and family business....starting with a reduction in the extortionate business rates, parking fees and parking inconvenience.....make people want to shop there, make it worth trading. ;)

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The BBC lunchtime news thought this was brilliant news, I'm afraid not, it's a tiny rise after a massive drop and then how on earth can you measure it that accurately. Is a rise a good thing anyway?

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Dunno about that. These figures are too complex to extrapolate a simple statement such as that above. Page 6 showes a different picture - more retailers experienced a drop in March turnover Y.O.Y. than a rise. And internet trading showed 10% growth, much of which would have been at the expense of the High St.

I'm a High St. retailer, and a member of local Chamber of Commerce, and anecdotal evidence from other retailers throughout the West Country would say that March was nothing to write home about.

As Mark Twain - "Lies, d*mn lies and ... "

I sympathise with you. I have long thought that the govt should introduce a special tax on internet retailers as they are killing the high street. When every town centre is a boarded up wasteland people will moan but they are causing it by looking in the shops and then buying online.

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Triple boost for Osborne: Retail sales and car production rise as public borrowing is £5bn less than expected

George Osborne was given a triple boost today as figures showed retail sales and car production up and public borrowing down.

Retail sales rose unexpectedly in March, up by 0.2 per cent month-on-month - defying experts' predictions of a 0.5 per cent plunge.

Car production in the UK also rose last month, with a total of 135,052 vehicles coming off out of the factories - a 14.8 per cent hike on March last year.

And public sector net borrowing for March was £18.6billion, taking the total for the financial year to £141.1billion - almost £5billion below the forecast.

Today is just full of good news, we only borrowed £18.6bn last month and the accumulative total is £5bn less than forecast time to break out the champagne.

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I sympathise with you. I have long thought that the govt should introduce a special tax on internet retailers as they are killing the high street. When every town centre is a boarded up wasteland people will moan but they are causing it by looking in the shops and then buying online.

:rolleyes:

I shop heavily on-line and most of the businesses I deal with are sole traders or small businesses who know their stuff and stock in-depth and don't have to recoup high street rates or property costs in their margins

Burdening those on-line traders with a gratuitous tax would do absolutely biff all to address the narrow product range, poor salesmanship and bonkers costs which are killing-off high street businesses

Edited by Charlton Peston

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I sympathise with you. I have long thought that the govt should introduce a special tax on internet retailers as they are killing the high street. When every town centre is a boarded up wasteland people will moan but they are causing it by looking in the shops and then buying online.

...alternatively, how about a special tax on large supermarkets and out of town superstores which never seem to have any problem getting planning permission for huge carparks whilst independent stores are being slaughtered by parking restrictions?

Edited by Charlton Peston

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:rolleyes:

I shop heavily on-line and most of the businesses I deal with are sole traders or small businesses who know their stuff and stock in-depth and don't have to recoup high street rates or property costs in their margins

Burdening those on-line traders with a gratuitous tax would do absolutely biff all to address the narrow product range, poor salesmanship and bonkers costs which are killing-off high street businesses

As you have so eloquently pointed out high street shops are burdened with all sorts of costs which mean that they can not afford to stock a wide range whereas internet retailers which are not burdened with extra costs can.

A rebalancing needs to be done.

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I sympathise with you. I have long thought that the govt should introduce a special tax on internet retailers as they are killing the high street. When every town centre is a boarded up wasteland people will moan but they are causing it by looking in the shops and then buying online.

Yes, that will work and they are entirely to blame.

It has nothing at all to do with high rents, high rates, high parking charges, high petrol prices. Aboslutely nothing. Not a thing. No.

Of course making things elsewhere more expensive will guarantee a return of bargain crazed shoppers in their millions to those run down high streets.

Every one I know has loads of disposable income they are just itching to gleefully throw at the charming, patient staff, selflessly devoting themselves to mastering the fine art of customer service in those well known temples of retail perfection such as, say... Dixons. And of course, they're sure to find everything they need for the entire family at any one of the numerous charity outlets that grace this Great Nations grandest thoroughfares.

You sir are a genius. I salute you . Excelsior!

Edited by Jack's Creation

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:rolleyes:

I shop heavily on-line and most of the businesses I deal with are sole traders or small businesses who know their stuff and stock in-depth and don't have to recoup high street rates or property costs in their margins

Burdening those on-line traders with a gratuitous tax would do absolutely biff all to address the narrow product range, poor salesmanship and bonkers costs which are killing-off high street businesses

I shop more now on-line only because to travel to shop costs £s in parking, and travel costs......and I can't carry and get what I want home on the bus that costs £6 return once a week......shopping has now become a logistic planning operation. ;)

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Nice reposte Jack's Creation.

The internet succeeds because it both simplifies and reduces cost - it's been a revolution. The solution to tax things into oblivion simply won't work. The high street is less attractive because it's less fun, ever more stressful (think parking) and a rip off. You can thank local councils, government, landlords and private equity for that.

I shop more now on-line only because to travel to shop costs £s in parking, and travel costs......and I can't carry and get what I want home on the bus that costs £6 return once a week......shopping has now become a logistic planning operation. ;)

You are right there. Costs of doing the shop are sufficient enough to think about it and the alternatives.

Edited by tinker

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I wish I hadn't mentioned internet sales now - we always get into this polarised internet versus The High Street argument.

Yes - some High Street retailers are rude and surly - I have been known to be grumpy on a really bad day, but I do my bet to be really helpful and cheerful 95% of the time. And there are some people working in retail who would be better employed as traffic wardens or abbatoir operatives. And yes - internet shopping is really convenient - I use it myself for some things rather than drive 30 miles to a shop that might just sell what i want, at 100% dearer than the internet price. Surprise, surprise - I'm human !

But the point I was really trying to make is that within the upbeat "retail sales are 3% up !" headlines, are a whole host of counterbalancing minuses -

* Food inflation is increasing at an astronomical % which artificially inflates the overall sales growth figure.

* Petrol / diesel too

* Many readers of these headlines tend to to think retail sales means shops.

Mark Twain still has my vote !

* btw, every time a shop closes down in my town, a cafe or service industry shop opens in its place. I suspect as a defensive ploy against the internet - after all, you can't get a cup of coffee, or a haircut, or an aromatherapy over the internet yet. We now have about 15 cafes out of a total of 90 shops - there's going to be an almighty shake-out soon ! :o

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Yes, that will work and they are entirely to blame.

It has nothing at all to do with high rents, high rates, high parking charges, high petrol prices. Aboslutely nothing. Not a thing. No.

Of course making things elsewhere more expensive will guarantee a return of bargain crazed shoppers in their millions to those run down high streets.

Every one I know has loads of disposable income they are just itching to gleefully throw at the charming, patient staff, selflessly devoting themselves to mastering the fine art of customer service in those well known temples of retail perfection such as, say... Dixons. And of course, they're sure to find everything they need for the entire family at any one of the numerous charity outlets that grace this Great Nations grandest thoroughfares.

You sir are a genius. I salute you . Excelsior!

Internet forums are a great place to make a fool out of oneself.

First off Dixons? Is this the Internet only brand of Dixons Retail Group that does not have one Store in the UK with Dixons over the door (with the exception of Dixons Travel at airports?

Then again perhaps you did not bother to read the post that I responded to where the guy said that he was An INDEPENDENT HIGH STREET RETAILER. Not out of town store so of course if you accidentally meant to type PC World or Currys.digital still not relevant because they are primarily out of town retailers.

So lets talk about what I was responding to independent high street retailers. As you have said high rents, high rates, etc are a disincentive to these types of retailers and they make up a lot of the character of our towns and cities and tend not to sell electrical goods any way, that is an internet/out of town area. We have tourists and day trippers that like to visit places like Chester, Stratford-upon-Avon etc and part of that enjoyment is seeing a diverse high street and culture, not row upon row of chav bars, fast food joints, amusement arcades and betting shops.

So now we basically have the large internet retailers all operating the channel islands vat scam and other tax avoidance scams like invoicing in belgium so no vat is liable, etc, etc. So applying a 10% sales tax on all internet sales (with no legal option to get out off which you can not do with VAT because of EU rules) yet exempting sole traders doing less 100K and then all independent retailers in the high street with the exception of bars, fast food, etc reduce their business rates to zero. Then as there would be loads of money left over pay for the repairs to their shops or to smarten them up, then with money still left over encourage with grants bakeries, local produce shops, local crafts shops, farmers co-operative shops, etc to replace the chav joints that are becoming ever present in our towns.

Then again we could do nothing and then be forced to sit at home with all our nice cheap electrical goods because the towns are all nogo ugly chav war zones and be forced to buy processed food from tescos because they have bought up all the farms in the UK and control supply.

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Then again we could do nothing and then be forced to sit at home with all our nice cheap electrical goods because the towns are all nogo ugly chav war zones and be forced to buy processed food from tescos because they have bought up all the farms in the UK and control supply.

Thanks to the advent of superstores and malls, high streets were dying long before Internet sales took off

And I doubt that the Internet is stealing much business from 'bakeries, local produce shops, local crafts shops, farmers co-operative shops, etc'

And promises to hypothecate tax are in the same league as 'the cheque's in the post'

My own distaste for your proposal is nothing to do with a personal desire to sit in my home surrounded by lovely cheap(er) electrical goods and everything to do with my dislike of taxation as a device for coercive social control

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I sympathise with you. I have long thought that the govt should introduce a special tax on internet retailers as they are killing the high street. When every town centre is a boarded up wasteland people will moan but they are causing it by looking in the shops and then buying online.

Why is tax always the solution?

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Why is tax always the solution?

It's always the solution for problems moral, environmental, or social.

Actually it's the answer for all ills! :blink::huh:

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  • 312 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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