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i know someone waaaay too young to be living in a bungalow. He bought it mainly because they just had a baby and was worried about stairs (I told him about this modern day invention called a stair gate and everything!)

To me, bungalows make me instantly think of hairy lipped aunties, pink/blue rhododendrons, crazy paving, pampass grass and the musty stench of death and palmolive soap. Even the word 'bungalow' makes me shiver.

Bungalow

*shivers* - see?

Why are they so damn expensive? Is it because of an aging population chasing a limited supply of 'safer' accomodation? ok they have a bit of land around them, but they're just the ground floor of a proper house, twice the price and ugly as sin, right?

Here's a garden pic from a bungalow (shivers) I encountered during my 'daily dose of disillusionment' from rightmove.com (Exeter, 24 hours, 5 Miles)

Does that path lead to the hereafter?

7126_sou090431_IMG_04_0000_max_620x414.jpg

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Actually yes, depending on what and where it is.

Think demographics, wealth distribution. prices might be the most resilient of the lot.

Maybe all the ftb's should buy them all up and point the loaded BTL gun back at older generation.

Edited by OnlyMe

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i Why are they so damn expensive? Is it because of an aging population chasing a limited supply of 'safer' accomodation? ok they have a bit of land around them, but they're just the ground floor of a proper house, twice the price and ugly as sin, right?

Depends where you are. Round here (rural Lincs) they are noticeably cheaper than similar sized houses, and often come with larger gardens, particularly if you are looking at detached properties. I don't like them, but would buy one simply because in this part of the world they are far better value than a house.

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i know someone waaaay too young to be living in a bungalow. He bought it mainly because they just had a baby and was worried about stairs (I told him about this modern day invention called a stair gate and everything!)

To me, bungalows make me instantly think of hairy lipped aunties, pink/blue rhododendrons, crazy paving, pampass grass and the musty stench of death and palmolive soap. Even the word 'bungalow' makes me shiver.

Bungalow

*shivers* - see?

Why are they so damn expensive? Is it because of an aging population chasing a limited supply of 'safer' accomodation? ok they have a bit of land around them, but they're just the ground floor of a proper house, twice the price and ugly as sin, right?

Here's a garden pic from a bungalow (shivers) I encountered during my 'daily dose of disillusionment' from rightmove.com (Exeter, 24 hours, 5 Miles)

Does that path lead to the hereafter?

7126_sou090431_IMG_04_0000_max_620x414.jpg

If I had the cash, this would be the bungalow for me.

http://www.tspc.co.uk/details.asp?id=99966

Mind you, I'm getting on a bit!

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I'm young and perfectly fit/healthy and would definately buy a bungalow.

It's all the benefits of a flat, but in house form with your own garden.

What's not to like?

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Why are they so damn expensive? Is it because of an aging population chasing a limited supply of 'safer' accomodation? ok they have a bit of land around them...

Bungalow near us is only thing that has sold quick this year. Asking £800K (a nearby semi wouldn't get that) and sold in a week. In a very nice road where there have been a couple of demolition/rebuilds. It is mainly the value of the land and potential that makes them expensive.

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Actually yes, depending on what and where it is.

Think demographics, wealth distribution. prices might be the most resilient of the lot.

Maybe all the ftb's should buy them all up and point the loaded BTL gun back at older generation.

Yep.'The most resiliant of the lot' as you say.

I live in one but don't own it yet, will try to exercise the Right to Buy while I still have the chance.

Hope to buy for 100k to 110k (with 34k discount) and sell it on for 100k/110k!

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Bungalow near us is only thing that has sold quick this year. Asking £800K (a nearby semi wouldn't get that) and sold in a week. In a very nice road where there have been a couple of demolition/rebuilds. It is mainly the value of the land and potential that makes them expensive.

Are you likely to get permission to build a house on a bungalow plot though?

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Generally you get a much bigger plot of land with a bungalow in relation to the level of occupancy of the building

So yes, definitely.

Exactly. I bought a lovely one. Semi detached, cracking F nad Back garded. NO FACTORS. No upstairs neighbours banging about, Land to house ratio is huge. It's magic.

I got a 22% discount on 2007 proce, but believe it'll hold up a bit better than the (more expensive(?!)) executive apartments just down the road. YAAAAS.

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The hierarchy of house desirability seems to run as follows,

1. Victorian rectory, Georgian town house, thatched cottage.

2. Edwardian detached

3. Funky, architect designed, detached new build

4. Edwardian semi-detached

5. 1930's semi-detached

6. New build slave box on estate, terraced house, bungalow

7. Ex local authority

So a bungalow isn't right at the bottom, but it's close to the bottom.

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I'm young and perfectly fit/healthy and would definately buy a bungalow.

It's all the benefits of a flat, but in house form with your own garden.

What's not to like?

Yep you summed it up.

I've always liked bungalows for a few reasons, one of them being you can see an unobscured sky when you walk down the road. Very nice on a summers evening. And for two of us, we don't need two floors to suck up heat & maintenance anyway. Add to that more privacy since neighbouring bungalows don't look down into your garden or lounge etc etc.

Bungalows basically rule the roost B)

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Are you likely to get permission to build a house on a bungalow plot though?

Yes. Bungalow in this case is in between two two/three (incl loft) storey houses. Probably knocked down a two storey to build bungalow originally.

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Yes. Bungalow in this case is in between two two/three (incl loft) storey houses. Probably knocked down a two storey to build bungalow originally.

So out goes the daylight/privacy arguments that Darkman sensibly extended.

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The hierarchy of house desirability seems to run as follows,

1. Victorian rectory, Georgian town house, thatched cottage.

2. Edwardian detached

3. Funky, architect designed, detached new build

4. Edwardian semi-detached

5. 1930's semi-detached

6. New build slave box on estate, terraced house, bungalow

7. Ex local authority

So a bungalow isn't right at the bottom, but it's close to the bottom.

It all depends on the area. 4 & 5 would swap where we are, and detached bungalow would probably rank higher than both. 3 would rank below all of them and certain terraces. A thatched cottage would be just above 7.

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The hierarchy of house desirability seems to run as follows,

1. Victorian rectory, Georgian town house, thatched cottage.

You can recreate that thatched cottage feel by just pouring petrol on your roof and setting fire to it.

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Bangalows are OK, they should sell quite easily, they are built on more land and feel more spacious, can always make it into a chalet bungalow, the lofts are large.......re thatches, as they say never live in one, live over the road from one. ;)

Edited by winkie

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Bungalows are AWESOME and I'd love one. You can get to the roof easier if it needs fixed, you get a large sprawl of land with usually a large back garden... think they're awesome.

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I don't have a view one way or another on the desirability of bungalows; I do however have a real issue with the word.

'Bungalow', I mean wtf?

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I don't have a view one way or another on the desirability of bungalows; I do however have a real issue with the word.

'Bungalow', I mean wtf?

When the builders ran out of bricks, they had to bung a low roof on it.

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we don't need two floors to suck up heat & maintenance anyway.

Heat rises.

I have always lived in a two storey until a couple of years in a bungalow from 2008 to 2010. I found I needed to put the heat on in my study a lot more than I did than when it was in an upstairs room.

I also wonder if a length of time spent in a bungalow actually weakens your knees. I don't feel as though mine are as good as they were.

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  • 312 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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