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University Ghost Town Fears... Property Values To Decline

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Any BTL'er who lets to students, if they have any sense, should of sold up by now.

UNIVERSITY GHOST TOWNS FEAR AS TUITION FEES RISE

Read more: http://www.express.co.uk/posts/view/241363/University-ghost-towns-fear-as-tuition-fees-riseUniversity-ghost-towns-fear-as-tuition-fees-rise#ixzz1Jrn10MP3

UNIVERSITY towns face seeing their student populations halve by 2020 because of soaring ­tuition fees, says a new report.

In the next decade there will be a surge in the number of undergraduates choosing to live at home and study locally, leaving some student areas ghost towns.

Almost half of students in a survey will stay with mum and dad by then instead of moving into digs – twice as many as in 2011 – with the numbers in higher education falling by 14 per cent.

Crime and criminal damage is likely to increase in affected ­towns, as many properties become vacant and even derelict.

Worst hit will be districts with large student populations like Jesmond and Moorside in Newcastle upon Tyne, Broomhill and Sharrow (Sheffield), and Boultham and Carholme (Lincoln).

Other cities which will feel the impact of the student exodus include Swansea, Portsmouth, Stoke-on-Trent and Nottingham, with university student populations forecasted to decline by 40 per cent in these areas.

Home insurer LV=, which commissioned the survey of 1,047 current, recent and prospective higher education students and their parents, said many of these places rely on university populations to boost their economies.

The study reveals that with ­average tuition fees expected to rise to more than £9,000 a year by 2020, 52 per cent of all younger students will choose a local higher education establishment and stay with their parents.

Just 21 per cent of UK full time students currently live at home. But this is expected to increase to a total of 47 per cent over the next 10 years.

Next year’s tuition fee ­increases, coupled with a decline in the number of young people aged 18-24 in the general population, will see a 14 per cent decline in higher education numbers.

Research shows families’ expectations have also been hit hard with the announcement of higher fees.

Eight per cent of parents who previously hoped their child would go on to higher education now doubt that they will. Experts predict that once the student exodus begins in 2012, property values in many affected towns will decline – with rental prices plummeting.

The shift to students living at home suggests the emergence of a large new category of “commuter students”, who will make longer journeys to attend courses to save money on living costs.

But the research also shows that almost half of current stay-at-home students believe living at home has made it harder to feel fully involved in student life.

However, some towns and cities could benefit from dwindling student communities elsewhere in the UK.

This is because areas with low existing populations are set to see a boost as young people remain in the area for longer.

Locations likely to attract the highest increases in students include Milton Keynes in Buckinghamshire, St Albans, Herts, and Swindon, Wilts.

In other cases, students living at home could be a liability for parents. Students have possessions worth £2,500 on average at their family home, with only a third of these items covered by the household insurance.

LV= urges parents to ensure they are properly insured. John O’Roarke, managing ­director of LV= home insurance, said: “With such a vast number of higher education students set to remain in the family home over the next 10 years, we would urge parents to ensure they have adequate insurance in place.”

l MIDDLE class children could lose top university places because of the scheme to help poorer pupils as part of the tuition fee changes, critics said yesterday.

Graham Stuart, Tory chairman of the Commons education committee, said: “The danger is that hardworking youngsters have their results disregarded because of nakedly political interference.

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Any BTL'er who lets to students, if they have any sense, should of sold up by now.

I'm buying near herts (not a BTL'er) and I can tell you that there's a move to put a lot of their courses online. It's hard to tell what this will mean when combined with the info given here.

Edited by Zante

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This occurred to me several months ago when £9,000 fees were first introduced. Fewer students going to university = fewer students needing temporary housing = empty BTLs = fire sales / repossessions.

Education, Education, Education.

Buy to Let, Buy to Let, Buy to Let.

House Price Inflation, House Price Inflation, House Price Inflation.

This little "education" racket helped Blair to amass a small fortune while "serving" as Prime Minister. If I'd known at the age of 18 what I know now I would not have gone to University. As much as I enjoyed it, and the skills and knowledge attained, I did it on the understanding I would be able to earn more over my lifetime than if I hadn't gone. This may well be true, but it's chicken feed compared to the quick and easy riches I would have accumulated had I followed Blair's actions rather than his advice.

All circumstantial though, I'm sure. <_<

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This occurred to me several months ago when £9,000 fees were first introduced. Fewer students going to university = fewer students needing temporary housing = empty BTLs = fire sales / repossessions.

And will it mean those that do go will try and go to ones near where their parents live so they can stay living at home to cut costs?

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I know several people that live next door to students, I'm sure they'll be the ones partying from this news. Look at grant crapps web site for welwyn, full of complaints from residents about students.

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This occurred to me several months ago when £9,000 fees were first introduced. Fewer students going to university = fewer students needing temporary housing = empty BTLs = fire sales / repossessions.

Yes £9,000 is such a huge figure, I am sure many, who would of done in the past, will not pursue Uni now.

And I should imagine those who do pay this sort of sum will be expecting a good standard of tuition.

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I can see certain areas of Newcastle become decimated. Certain new builds catering towards students completely might take a hit (such as a newly built almost finished high rise in the city centre of Newcastle).

Some areas of Newcastle (Jesmond in particular, but also Heaton) probably has somewhere between 50% students and more). Student BTL is a big game in Newcastle comparative to its size as there are two very big unis in town - Northumbria and Newcastle uni.

God how I learnt to loathe noisy students, I was NOT that noisy :P

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And will it mean those that do go will try and go to ones near where their parents live so they can stay living at home to cut costs?

Yes....I can't see how students or their parents could afford to pay the rents along with everything else.....there must be a better way, if not now it will be along soon no doubt. ;)

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Yes....I can't see how students or their parents could afford to pay the rents along with everything else.....there must be a better way, if not now it will be along soon no doubt. ;)

I think it may have the opposite effect, more students going to unis further away from home than currently, their whippersnapper socialist tendencies will see the potential difficulties coming to this unfortunate group of philanthropists and theyll do the the right thing to do to help to hard working BTL families.

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Yes £9,000 is such a huge figure, I am sure many, who would of done in the past, will not pursue Uni now.

I imagine there'll be a big rise in the number of OU students.

At current rates you can get the equivalent of a 3 year honours degree for £4,200.

(6 x courses at £700 a pop)

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I think it may have the opposite effect, more students going to unis further away from home than currently, their whippersnapper socialist tendencies will see the potential difficulties coming to this unfortunate group of philanthropists and theyll do the the right thing to do to help to hard working BTL families.

I think many students have always like the idea of getting away from home....finding their own independence, meeting new people....the high rental costs may now put a barrier in the way, maybe unis could provide more of their own accommodation I know a few do already after the first year. ;)

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And will it mean those that do go will try and go to ones near where their parents live so they can stay living at home to cut costs?

That would be my assumption. Indeed, that's what I would recommend to my own kids and the direction my sister is thinking with her own.

I also think Zante is correct regarding an increase in online programmes. I also envisage an increase in part-time degrees, so rather than 3 years on campus it may be 5 years at a distance while working FT. Though TBH you can probably complete it in 3 years, part-time, too, once you take socialising out of the equation.

Study at local uni, live at home with parents, PAYG tuition fees paid for with earnings from FT work and no massive debts at the end of it. Working students may even have managed to save enough money in the process to buy their first home upon graduation.

Whichever way you look at it it doesn't bode well for BTL.

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Aberystwyth springs to mind

better invest more on the holiday front methinks

Treforest will be hit hard too

What town does anyone think will be the worst affected ?

Hull perhaps? why else would anyone want to go there unless necessary?

Edited by Tankus

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This very subject came up at a family wedding at the weekend, but not with respect to BTL.

We reckoned there were several places in the UK where the local population is quite small in comparison to the number of students living in the area. Used to a huge influx of money the town centres are going to be decimated.

The only ones we could think of off the top of our heads were Aberysthwyth, Loughborough and Pontypridd (University of Glamorgan), but we reckoned there must be several more.

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Aberystwyth springs to mind

better invest more on the holiday front methinks

Treforest will be hit hard too

What town does anyone think will be the worst affected ?

Hull perhaps? why else would anyone want to go there unless necessary?

Beat me to it.

Loughborough, according to my brother.

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This very subject came up at a family wedding at the weekend, but not with respect to BTL.

We reckoned there were several places in the UK where the local population is quite small in comparison to the number of students living in the area. Used to a huge influx of money the town centres are going to be decimated.

The only ones we could think of off the top of our heads were Aberysthwyth, Loughborough and Pontypridd (University of Glamorgan), but we reckoned there must be several more.

Lancaster has nearly 13,000 students and a population of about 50,000 + some stupidly expensive prices.

Aber's a good call btw.

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Hmmm, from what I can tell students are increasingly the kids of well-off people who can probably afford to pay whatever level of fees is levied.

Certainly, despite the disappearance of the student grant and the emergence of loans in recent years it seems that students in my locality have plenty of money for decent cars, iphones, trendy clothes, heading out drinking most evenings with beer well north of £3 a pint etc.

These days a higher education seems to depend on how wealthy your family is, not whether or not you have the brains to do well in exams. Ever more dumbed down exams help the rich kids get the grades they need.

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This occurred to me several months ago when £9,000 fees were first introduced. Fewer students going to university = fewer students needing temporary housing = empty BTLs = fire sales / repossessions.

This little "education" racket helped Blair to amass a small fortune while "serving" as Prime Minister. If I'd known at the age of 18 what I know now I would not have gone to University. As much as I enjoyed it, and the skills and knowledge attained, I did it on the understanding I would be able to earn more over my lifetime than if I hadn't gone. This may well be true, but it's chicken feed compared to the quick and easy riches I would have accumulated had I followed Blair's actions rather than his advice.

All circumstantial though, I'm sure. <_<

I know but you learned to get p!ssed I reckon...yes?

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Aberystwyth springs to mind

better invest more on the holiday front methinks

Treforest will be hit hard too

What town does anyone think will be the worst affected ?

Hull perhaps? why else would anyone want to go there unless necessary?

As a matter of interest (being somebody from Hull) can I ask when you were last there?

http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=981142

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Loughborough will be harder hit than most, its a sports university so the students will be able to run in from miles away

Don't know if you were being funny or not with this post.

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"Listen mate, I know it says 9 grand in the brochure but we'll do you a deal".

As for all this home study stuff, some courses could be taught over the net. But others are more difficult.

You could imagine a 3 year chemistry course, where year 1 is theory, then 1 year of practical on site, followed by 6 months more of theory and I final 6 months on site for practicals. Could lower course costs (less lectures, same courses every year etc).

Change brings innovation.

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  • 312 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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