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Investors Seek Government Help To Cut Bank Fees: Report

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http://uk.finance.yahoo.com/news/Investors-seek-government-reuters_molt-129557633.html?x=0

Investors seek government help to cut bank fees: report
14:23, Sunday 17 April 2011
LONDON (Reuters) - Shareholder groups have approached the government with proposals aimed at cutting back the multi-million pound fees charged by investment banks to advise companies, the Sunday Telegraph reported.

Asking the government to help in these circumstances is like a chinchilla asking a Golden Eagle to hide it under it wings to protect it from an anaconda. :o

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http://uk.finance.yahoo.com/news/Investors-seek-government-reuters_molt-129557633.html?x=0

Investors seek government help to cut bank fees: report
14:23, Sunday 17 April 2011
LONDON (Reuters) - Shareholder groups have approached the government with proposals aimed at cutting back the multi-million pound fees charged by investment banks to advise companies, the Sunday Telegraph reported.

Asking the government to help in these circumstances is like a chinchilla asking a Golden Eagle to hide it under it wings to protect it from an anaconda. :o

This is an issue the government should help with.

The problem investors have is that the investment banks control enough shares in most companies to vote in their men on the board. In exchange for the nice job and exorbitant salary, directors have to place overpriced business with those investment banks. Result, the real investors get hosed, by the directors and the investment banks.

The government should change the law, so that only the individuals who are beneficial owners of the shares can vote on them. This breaks the control. The gazillions of shares that the investment banks control via fund management, lose their votes. Then the investors get to chose their directors, probably with more modest salaries, who will be out on their ears if they place overpriced business with the investment bankers.

It may not lock the bad guys up, but such a law change would improve returns to investors, and make it more difficult for these crooks to steal your money.

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This is an issue the government should help with.

The problem investors have is that the investment banks control enough shares in most companies to vote in their men on the board. In exchange for the nice job and exorbitant salary, directors have to place overpriced business with those investment banks. Result, the real investors get hosed, by the directors and the investment banks.

The government should change the law, so that only the individuals who are beneficial owners of the shares can vote on them. This breaks the control. The gazillions of shares that the investment banks control via fund management, lose their votes. Then the investors get to chose their directors, probably with more modest salaries, who will be out on their ears if they place overpriced business with the investment bankers.

It may not lock the bad guys up, but such a law change would improve returns to investors, and make it more difficult for these crooks to steal your money.

Much easier just to rescind the legal tender law so that the banks can't got this sort of power in the first place.

Free markets please!

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http://uk.finance.yahoo.com/news/Investors-seek-government-reuters_molt-129557633.html?x=0

Investors seek government help to cut bank fees: report
14:23, Sunday 17 April 2011
LONDON (Reuters) - Shareholder groups have approached the government with proposals aimed at cutting back the multi-million pound fees charged by investment banks to advise companies, the Sunday Telegraph reported.

Asking the government to help in these circumstances is like a chinchilla asking a Golden Eagle to hide it under it wings to protect it from an anaconda. :o

Just one problem:

gimps2.jpg

post-15752-0-13104300-1303048552_thumb.jpg

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Much easier just to rescind the legal tender law so that the banks can't got this sort of power in the first place.

Free markets please!

Investment banks would still seek to control shares via insurance companies, pension funds and unit trusts, however you define money.

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Investment banks would still seek to control shares via insurance companies, pension funds and unit trusts, however you define money.

Without the legal tender law, they simply wouldn't exist.

Neither would shares as we know them, in fact.

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Without the legal tender law, they simply wouldn't exist.

Neither would shares as we know them, in fact.

Hmm bit of a sledgehammer to crack a nut, don't you think? Abolishing money and shares in order to kill off one extortion racket?

I suspect the shareholders will get naff all support from the government.

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  • 295 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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