Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Mrs Bear

Unsolicited Calls From Bank

Recommended Posts

Second time this has happened.

'Is that Mrs B?'

'Speaking.'

'It's So-and-So from Barclays calling - can I just confirm your date of birth?'

'I'm not giving out that sort of information over the phone.'

'Would it reassure you if I can prove this is Barclays Bank calling?'

'No, and would you mind telling me why you're calling me anyway?'

'Just to check that you're getting the best out of Barclays.'

'I don't want anything from Barclays I haven't got, and I really can't understand why you call like this, when anyone with half a brain cell is going to think it's a scam.'

'OK, thank you for your time.'

First time this sort of thing happened I did 1471 for the number and phoned their security dept. to check.

It was on the level, but if it hadn't been, and I'd been daft enough to dish out personal info and someone had raided my cash, you can bet they'd have said it was my own fault for being so stupid.

Presumably they wanted to sell me a loan or some other 'product' at rubbish rates.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Second time this has happened.

'Is that Mrs B?'

'Speaking.'

'It's So-and-So from Barclays calling - can I just confirm your date of birth?'

'I'm not giving out that sort of information over the phone.'

'Would it reassure you if I can prove this is Barclays Bank calling?'

'No, and would you mind telling me why you're calling me anyway?'

'Just to check that you're getting the best out of Barclays.'

'I don't want anything from Barclays I haven't got, and I really can't understand why you call like this, when anyone with half a brain cell is going to think it's a scam.'

'OK, thank you for your time.'

First time this sort of thing happened I did 1471 for the number and phoned their security dept. to check.

It was on the level, but if it hadn't been, and I'd been daft enough to dish out personal info and someone had raided my cash, you can bet they'd have said it was my own fault for being so stupid.

Presumably they wanted to sell me a loan or some other 'product' at rubbish rates.

This is happening to me with increasing regularity. The callers always seem surprised when I refuse to give out my personal information. It's time such calls were regulated out of existence.:angry:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Second time this has happened.

'Is that Mrs B?'

'Speaking.'

'It's So-and-So from Barclays calling - can I just confirm your date of birth?'

'I'm not giving out that sort of information over the phone.'

'Would it reassure you if I can prove this is Barclays Bank calling?'

'No, and would you mind telling me why you're calling me anyway?'

'Just to check that you're getting the best out of Barclays.'

'I don't want anything from Barclays I haven't got, and I really can't understand why you call like this, when anyone with half a brain cell is going to think it's a scam.'

'OK, thank you for your time.'

First time this sort of thing happened I did 1471 for the number and phoned their security dept. to check.

It was on the level, but if it hadn't been, and I'd been daft enough to dish out personal info and someone had raided my cash, you can bet they'd have said it was my own fault for being so stupid.

Presumably they wanted to sell me a loan or some other 'product' at rubbish rates.

The last time this happened to me was in late summer 2008 when the markets and bank funding were going T its up; continually pestered by the big names for me to put my savings with them..... we all know what happened next :ph34r:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Second time this has happened.

'Is that Mrs B?'

'Speaking.'

'It's So-and-So from Barclays calling - can I just confirm your date of birth?'

'I'm not giving out that sort of information over the phone.'

'Would it reassure you if I can prove this is Barclays Bank calling?'

I'd say it's seriously unlikely that was Barclays.

First time this sort of thing happened I did 1471 for the number and phoned their security dept. to check.

It was on the level, but if it hadn't been, and I'd been daft enough to dish out personal info and someone had raided my cash, you can bet they'd have said it was my own fault for being so stupid.

Oh, er, well, erm, ...

Guessing here: it's someone who has got themselves an agency agreement to act "for" Barclays, and having got it, cares neither about annoying you nor about abusing Barclays' name. Security department constrained in what they can say.

Your final point is a good one, and symptomatic of what looks like a trend. "Verified by Visa" is an obvious example: train users to give their details to an unverifiable[1] third-party, just as a phisher would wish. My recent brush with Capita Registrars was another:

Training to be a victim

A couple of weeks ago, I received two essentially-identical letters in the post. They claim to be from Capita Registrars. There’s a Capita logo, and a footer referencing contact details for Capita Registrars. So far so good, but does that mean they’re from Capita? A competent fraudster might very well impersonate them to get my identity details and a foot in the door of my finances (whatever they may be).

The letters run:

IMPORTANT: Protecting your shareholding against fraud

Dear [me]

We have recently received an instruction to change details on your holding.

The following details have been changed:

- The way you receive your payments

If you did not ask for any changes, please contact us immediately by telephoning [....]

This letter is sent in the interest of shareholder security so you can let us know if we have made any changes you did not ask for.

Yours sincerely

[scrawl]

For and on behalf of

Shareholder Security Team

I haven’t instructed them to make any changes, but I do have two new shareholdings with instructions to pay dividends direct to my bank account. If it’s genuine it’s good they’re taking care of security, but I can’t verify it.

* There is no reference to what shareholding they might be talking about.

* I can’t verify that phone number. Google finds it not on Capita’s pages, but on a page about numbers with complaints against them[2].

This is almost as bad as Verified by Visa. Not quite as bad: the fraudster still has a way to go from convincing me to ‘phone their number to getting their hands on my assets. But it’s the same principle: as soon as I respond to a letter, I’m doing exactly what a fraudster needs me to do to fall victim. And of course, when I ‘phone the fraudster’s number, they will naturally need to ask a bunch of sensitive questions to verify I am really me: sufficient to identify me, and if they’re good at blagging they might get a whole lot more.

To follow this up, I started with Google and Capita, through which I established to my own satisfaction that the Capita Registrars website was genuine. Searching it for contact information I could safely use, I found the choice of a couple of email addresses, or ‘phone numbers. Or could I check it all myself online?

I tried signing up for Capita’s online shareholder services: if I can verify my shareholdings and associated payment details, I can see for myself whether the letters really need following up! I’ve tried that before, but this time I carried it through. I am indeed similarly signed up with other registrars: ComputerShare’s online service which works to a satisfactory level, and Equiniti’s which is amazingly bad but might at least have been sufficient to follow up these letters.

Signing up for this online service, I first gathered together all my Capita-issued share certificates. Ten of them (seven distinct holdings; eight distinct stock codes). Following the signup procedure, I entered the details for one of them and created an account. From there I was able to verify that that shareholding was in order, but I was completely unable to access any other holding.

After trying every bloomin’ path in the system, I logged out, and tried logging back in using another share certificate. It rejected the username/password I’d just created! Seems the system requires me to create a separate account for every holding. Indeed, not merely create it once, but log in eight separate times – each a complex process – any time I get a shareholder security letter in future.

Well, bugger this: surely I must be missing something???? OK, try emailing. That got me an automated reply promising attention within 48 hours. The following day a human reply, offering to ‘phone me and follow up on points I’d raised. Great, I’m getting somewhere!

I took up the offer and they duly ‘phoned. We were quickly able to trace the matter of the two letters to my new shareholdings, thus resolving the original issue. I also raised my concerns about their system: letters indistinguishable from phishing, scarce information with which to follow up, and is their online system really as useless as it seems?

Encouragingly, the lady I spoke to sounded good: she wasn’t some call-centre drone reading from a script, and she sounded receptive to my points about phishing and unverifiable information. She told me they were proud never to have suffered fraud, but that begs the question of how you count responsibility for a phishing victim who subsequently suffers identity theft but not loss of the specific shares. I stressed that if it hasn’t happened yet, it can only be a matter of time.

On the question of their online services she confirmed yes, amazingly, they really are that bad!

Let’s see if anything changes following my call ….

[1] until after the event.

[2] turns out the page lists every number in a neighbourhood - this number was in the majority list of numbers with no complaints. But that was in retrospect: I only checked at that level of detail when this became a narrative.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From what I recall, the HSBC online banking system allows you to specify how they can contact you. I just have "By Letter" ticked.

If you're signed up for Barclay's online banking, they may have a similar set of preferences.

How can I get the best out of HSBC? Try paying IRs that aren't negative. 6% after tax would be a start.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd say it's seriously unlikely that was Barclays.

Oh, er, well, erm, ...

Guessing here: it's someone who has got themselves an agency agreement to act "for" Barclays, and having got it, cares neither about annoying you nor about abusing Barclays' name. Security department constrained in what they can say.

Your final point is a good one, and symptomatic of what looks like a trend. "Verified by Visa" is an obvious example: train users to give their details to an unverifiable[1] third-party, just as a phisher would wish. My recent brush with Capita Registrars was another:

In fact I think it's probably just their own marketing team desperately trying to flog 'products'. Can't help feeling sorry for anyone in that sort of job, it can't be much fun.

I recently phoned to ask them to stop sending me endless loan offers, since it hacks me off to have to rip my details off the letter and shred them.

Yet another in the post yesterday. :ph34r:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In fact I think it's probably just their own marketing team desperately trying to flog 'products'. Can't help feeling sorry for anyone in that sort of job, it can't be much fun.

I recently phoned to ask them to stop sending me endless loan offers, since it hacks me off to have to rip my details off the letter and shred them.

Yet another in the post yesterday. :ph34r:

Hmmm ...

I have a business account with Barclays. Yet they're not one of the pedlars of junk to blight my life. Guess I must've ticked the right data protection boxes when I opened the account.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Second time this has happened.

'Is that Mrs B?'

'Speaking.'

'It's So-and-So from Barclays calling - can I just confirm your date of birth?'

'I'm not giving out that sort of information over the phone.'

'Would it reassure you if I can prove this is Barclays Bank calling?'

'No, and would you mind telling me why you're calling me anyway?'

'Just to check that you're getting the best out of Barclays.'

'I don't want anything from Barclays I haven't got, and I really can't understand why you call like this, when anyone with half a brain cell is going to think it's a scam.'

'OK, thank you for your time.'

First time this sort of thing happened I did 1471 for the number and phoned their security dept. to check.

It was on the level, but if it hadn't been, and I'd been daft enough to dish out personal info and someone had raided my cash, you can bet they'd have said it was my own fault for being so stupid.

Presumably they wanted to sell me a loan or some other 'product' at rubbish rates.

I have a phone which shows the number of the caller; I never answer unless I know the number and most calls are: "international"; "withheld"; "unavailable" and these are "junk" calls.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I look forward to the day when a lethal cocktail of ever cheaper computer power and near free VOIP calls, allows international spammers to call everyone hundreds of times per minute.

Oh what joy that day will bring.

Ah - the so called AI Apocalyptic valley

valley2.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a phone which shows the number of the caller; I never answer unless I know the number and most calls are: "international"; "withheld"; "unavailable" and these are "junk" calls.

Shows the number? By the time you've dropped what you're doing and run to answer it, you're too late to stop it disrupting you! Better to see off spammers at the exchange.

A good start is to block 08** and withheld numbers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In fact I think it's probably just their own marketing team desperately trying to flog 'products'. Can't help feeling sorry for anyone in that sort of job, it can't be much fun.

I recently phoned to ask them to stop sending me endless loan offers, since it hacks me off to have to rip my details off the letter and shred them.

Yet another in the post yesterday. :ph34r:

Take the business-reply envelope that came with them, fill it with local pizza fliers or whatever else has been stuffed through your door recently and post it back to them.

Might as well at least get some childish amusement out of it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Shows the number? By the time you've dropped what you're doing and run to answer it, you're too late to stop it disrupting you! Better to see off spammers at the exchange.

A good start is to block 08** and withheld numbers.

Registering with the telephone preference scheme has cut out most of the unsolicited calls for me. We probably only get two or three a week now.

Junk faxes were the bane of my life when I was in business and the fax preference scheme was brilliant, cut out nearly all of them, from ten a day to ten a year.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Junk faxes were the bane of my life when I was in business and the fax preference scheme was brilliant

At the place I used to work we'd come in on Monday morning to find the floor decorated with junk faxes. So many had come through that they'd spilled out of the tray.

In fact most of what was received on that fax was junk mail.

Having had to change the ink ribbon thingy a few times, I would have appreciated the FPS back then. Sadly I didn't know about it in those days.

Speaking of Barclays, I registered with the Mail Preference Service and kicked up a stink when Barclays sent me some junk mail. I had never had anything to do with Barclays (or so I thought). Turns out Clydesdale Finance is part of the Barclays group. :rolleyes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This sort of thing happens to me all the time (several times a week) with my financial services and utility companies. Hazard of working at home?

My worst offenders are banks, talk talk and npower. I always tell them, as they tell you too, that I will not discuss any personal details or agree to anything over the phone. Doesnt stop them ringing back though. However, after npower rang me for the 3rd time in less than 24 hours the other week I completely lost it at the poor sap who rang me. They havent called back since. Perhaps losing it at them is the only solution?

And before anyone says, yes I always tick/untick appropriate boxes, and am on both telephone and mailing preference lists. Doesnt stop the feckers. And I cant ignore or block numbers as I'm working and cant afford to block out people like that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I sometimes ask the caller their name, birthdate and address, or ask them for a fictitious reference number.

It usually completely stumps them.

If they do attempt a reply, I tell them 'sorry, that's the wrong security information' and put the phone down.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a phone which shows the number of the caller; I never answer unless I know the number and most calls are: "international"; "withheld"; "unavailable" and these are "junk" calls.

I've taken that one step further and put anonymous call reject on my home line: if someone rings without revealing their number, they'll get a recorded message telling them that my line does not accept anonymous calls, and the phone doesn't even ring at my end. Costs four quid a month but worth every penny.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I sometimes ask the caller their name, birthdate and address, or ask them for a fictitious reference number.

It usually completely stumps them.

If they do attempt a reply, I tell them 'sorry, that's the wrong security information' and put the phone down.

Great Idea. :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've taken that one step further and put anonymous call reject on my home line: if someone rings without revealing their number, they'll get a recorded message telling them that my line does not accept anonymous calls, and the phone doesn't even ring at my end. Costs four quid a month but worth every penny.

A friend of mine says, 'Can you just hang on a second?' - and then goes and switches the vacuum cleaner on and leaves it right by the phone.

I haven't resorted to that - yet. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

BTW, I have discovered a sure fire way to get rid of Indian call centres.

Just say, "sorry can you repeat that, your English is very poor"

Say that once or twice and they usually hang up, probably fearing that they'll be sacked by not being clear enough.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I heard of some chap who set up a whole telephone automated answering service, with menu options and everything. Basically, his computer monitored all incoming calls and whenever it recognised a caller as from his bank/utility companies/anonymous, it would put them through this whole charade of choosing options, "would you like to hear this menu again?", "please press the star key, twice", "if are calling in relation to a bill, please press 2", "enter the number you are calling from and then press hash", etc. in an endless mind-melting decision-tree-loop.

It might have only been an urban legend ... but we can dream. :)

It's increasingly popular.

You can do something less extreme by just getting a VOIP service and running asterisk. Puts you in charge of your own switchboard so you can just reject, for example, number-withheld or call-centre-originating calls without it ever ringing (and without paying BT for special services). What you describe is just one kind of example, and is more usually used with a message along the lines of "if you're a human, press 2 to call me" just to weed out the 'bots.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • 276 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.