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The Masked Tulip

Bmibaby Pulling Out Of Cardiff Airport

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http://www.walesonline.co.uk/news/wales-news/2011/04/13/bmibaby-pulling-out-of-cardiff-airport-91466-28514331/

This is going to be bad news for holiday home owners and those renting properties in the med - those in Wales anyhow.

I know of loads of Welsh people who bought properties in the Sun on the back of BMI flying to Europe. May were renting out their properties because it was quick and easy to fly to/from Cardiff with BMI.

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http://www.walesonli...91466-28514331/

This is going to be bad news for holiday home owners and those renting properties in the med - those in Wales anyhow.

I know of loads of Welsh people who bought properties in the Sun on the back of BMI flying to Europe. May were renting out their properties because it was quick and easy to fly to/from Cardiff with BMI.

Manchester as well

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http://www.walesonline.co.uk/news/wales-news/2011/04/13/bmibaby-pulling-out-of-cardiff-airport-91466-28514331/

This is going to be bad news for holiday home owners and those renting properties in the med - those in Wales anyhow.

I know of loads of Welsh people who bought properties in the Sun on the back of BMI flying to Europe. May were renting out their properties because it was quick and easy to fly to/from Cardiff with BMI.

Dont worry, they can drive to the nearest airport....full tank of petrol only costs 100 quid a go now.....

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I hadn't heard this. Yes, deffinately going to effect my inlaws. They have a place in spain and fly out with friends and kids at least 3 times a year. Will another airline not just jump in?

On the other hand Bristol is only another hour away and easyjet are so much better than the other budget lines.

Edited by TylerDurden

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I hadn't heard this. Yes, deffinately going to effect my inlaws. They have a place in spain and fly out with friends and kids at least 3 times a year. Will another airline not just jump in?

On the other hand Bristol is only another hour away and easyjet are so much better than the other budget lines.

Problem is, that the Bristol destinations are not the same, usually, as the Cardiff ones. Bristol is so hard to get to also, added fuel and bridge costs.

No, I can see the BMI pull-out from Cardiff being a huge problem for anyone who has bought holidays homes in BMI Cardiff destinations.

They have this Summer to flog them. :unsure:

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With almost the entire welsh workforce being either in public service jobs or in sheep farming/food and beverage/hospitality work, and the rest of the people of working age being in receipt of benefits, BMI Baby was probably already seeing a large fall in seat occupancy rates and is likely to have figured out that seat sales are only going one way.

Airlines can only be profitable if almost all seats are full - since Wales will be hit much harder than many regions of the UK by cuts etc, it is merely an "adjustment back to the norm" for airlines to pull out of welsh airports.

Perhaps Masked Tulip can recall how many airlines flew out of Wales in the 70's? This is the future - assuming many of the regional airports even survive, some have closed already, bust (eg Coventry).

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With almost the entire welsh workforce being either in public service jobs or in sheep farming/food and beverage/hospitality work, and the rest of the people of working age being in receipt of benefits, BMI Baby was probably already seeing a large fall in seat occupancy rates and is likely to have figured out that seat sales are only going one way.

Airlines can only be profitable if almost all seats are full - since Wales will be hit much harder than many regions of the UK by cuts etc, it is merely an "adjustment back to the norm" for airlines to pull out of welsh airports.

Perhaps Masked Tulip can recall how many airlines flew out of Wales in the 70's? This is the future - assuming many of the regional airports even survive, some have closed already, bust (eg Coventry).

That is an excellent and thought-provoking post CB. You are probably spot on.

Prior to the low-cost flights Cardiff was mainly BA flying expensive seats in very small lear type jets to Paris, Edinburgh and also Brussels so that Kinnock, then EU Commissioner, would have flights to and from Wales. I used to fly these and sometimes there were no more than half a dozen people on them. BA cancelled the routes one by one with the Brussels route finally going soon after Kinnock stopped being EU Comissioner.

The other carrier was KLM with daily flights to Schipol which was always full.

Apart from that, that was it other than the holiday companies flying package holiday-makers to the Canary Islands, Spain and occasionally Greece.

BMI might be seeing a big turn-down in bookings for this Summer already. Spot on CB. Good stuff.

Edit:

Whilst UK unemployment figures were down this month, unemployment in Wales rose.

Edited by The Masked Tulip

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Just watched the item on this on Wales Today and also gleaned some figures from the BBC and BMI baby websites.

In 2002 BMI baby flew to 12 destinations from Cardiff, putting on 100 flights per week (though I don't know if that was all year round). By 2011 this had been reduced to 9 routes and 30 flights a week, and those only from mid April to end October.

In 2006/07 BMI baby was responsible for 34% of the passenger volumes at Cardiff, in 2010 it was less than 14%. And that would be 14% of a lower total, too - in 2009 Cardiff handled 1.6 million passenger journeys, in 2010 that was down to 1.4 million.

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My opinion of BMI Baby took a sharp and terminal nosedive when they charged me £18, and called it a credit card surcharge, immediately after clearly stating that the credit card charge was £1.50 per person per flight. I don't know where they learned to count but to me, two people taking two flights works out at £6.

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It's a similar story at Teesside. I've been flying long-haul out of there through Amsterdam regularly since 2002. I've always liked it because it's easy to get to from my home, car parking is cheap, queues virtually non-existent and AMS a relatively painless airport to transfer at. Starting around 2004 the charter and lo-co airlines all piled in, and by 2006-07 the place was really quite busy. Ryanair and BMI Baby had several flights a day, most of them to Costa del Hell resorts, and Monarch, First Choice and the other holiday charter outfits all had a major presence there, too. Around this time they also built a major extension onto the terminal, too. But from 2008-10, things fell off a cliff. There are only around five flights a day, now - the three KLMs to Amsterdam, and one or two Eastern Airlines flights to Aberdeen (presumably linking the Teesside chemical industry with the Aberdeen oil activity). The last few times I've travelled, the place has been a ghost town. And ominously, loads on the KLM flights are dropping, too. There were only about 20-30 on a 70-seat plane on the last three or four trips I've taken. With those sorts of customer numbers, I wouldn't be surprised if KLM reduces the number of flights each day before long.

And in what IMO is a totally suicidal act, at the start of this year the airport introduced a £6 departure fee to finance 'airport improvements' (translation: to make up for the loss of income from all those discountinued flights, I suspect), payable up-front before you're allowed through security. Given that Ryanair and Easyjet have a policy of not using airports that charge departure fees, and that it's something the passenger really notices, this can't be doing their prospects of an upturn any good. If I was travelling in a family of four, that £24 would be a significant incentive to use one of the other three airports serving the same catchment area (Leeds/Bradford, Manchester and Newcastle). The free bus that used to run from Darlington station has also been stopped, meaning that the airport is no longer really accessible except by car. The parking is still a lot cheaper than at competitor airports, though, at around £35 a week.

I suspect the reasons for the very rapid decline in MME's fortunes is similar to that at Cardiff: the overwhelming majority of people passing through there were either public sector professionals travelling on work, or public sector leisure passengers off on their holidays. Unless something turns round soon, or the airport is willing to subsidise passenger operations very heavily with revenue from the other stuff it does (police helicopters, aircrew training etc.), I can't see it surviving for much longer.

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And in what IMO is a totally suicidal act, at the start of this year the airport introduced a £6 departure fee to finance 'airport improvements' (translation: to make up for the loss of income from all those discountinued flights, I suspect), payable up-front before you're allowed through security.

Cardiff put up car parkig charges recently I seem to recall reading.

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Fascinating thought though isn't it?

In 10-20 years time, because of the cost and stoked up MMGW fears, flying will be a rare activity.

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Fascinating thought though isn't it?

In 10-20 years time, because of the cost and stoked up MMGW fears, flying will be a rare activity.

Just like it was 30-40 years ago.

Hey ho, back to three day bus journeys to Greece, as in my youth.

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The airport in Rhoose is twelve miles from Cardiff through winding country roads, nestling in countryside on the South Wales coast. Had direct rail or road links been built the airport would have gained prominence.

Building a new airport between Cardiff and Newport may be a better option given the availability of flat land and the proximity of the M4 and main Swansea to London railway. Relocating the airport there would make it a more attractive prospect to potential passengers in the West of England too.

Singapore relocated its international airport twice in the space of two decades, firstly from Kallang to Paya Lebar then to Changi.

Edited by Dave Spart

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The airport in Rhoose is twelve miles from Cardiff through winding country roads, nestling in countryside on the South Wales coast. Had direct rail or road links been built the airport would have gained prominence.

Leeds/Bradford is in a similar position. The road links are better, but this is offset by parking charges that are almost as high as those of the London airports. But there is no even remotely sane public transport link, and yet the place appears to be doing OK.

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It's a similar story at Teesside. I've been flying long-haul out of there through Amsterdam regularly since 2002. I've always liked it because it's easy to get to from my home, car parking is cheap, queues virtually non-existent and AMS a relatively painless airport to transfer at. Starting around 2004 the charter and lo-co airlines all piled in, and by 2006-07 the place was really quite busy. Ryanair and BMI Baby had several flights a day, most of them to Costa del Hell resorts, and Monarch, First Choice and the other holiday charter outfits all had a major presence there, too. Around this time they also built a major extension onto the terminal, too. But from 2008-10, things fell off a cliff. There are only around five flights a day, now - the three KLMs to Amsterdam, and one or two Eastern Airlines flights to Aberdeen (presumably linking the Teesside chemical industry with the Aberdeen oil activity). The last few times I've travelled, the place has been a ghost town. And ominously, loads on the KLM flights are dropping, too. There were only about 20-30 on a 70-seat plane on the last three or four trips I've taken. With those sorts of customer numbers, I wouldn't be surprised if KLM reduces the number of flights each day before long.

And in what IMO is a totally suicidal act, at the start of this year the airport introduced a £6 departure fee to finance 'airport improvements' (translation: to make up for the loss of income from all those discountinued flights, I suspect), payable up-front before you're allowed through security. Given that Ryanair and Easyjet have a policy of not using airports that charge departure fees, and that it's something the passenger really notices, this can't be doing their prospects of an upturn any good. If I was travelling in a family of four, that £24 would be a significant incentive to use one of the other three airports serving the same catchment area (Leeds/Bradford, Manchester and Newcastle). The free bus that used to run from Darlington station has also been stopped, meaning that the airport is no longer really accessible except by car. The parking is still a lot cheaper than at competitor airports, though, at around £35 a week.

I suspect the reasons for the very rapid decline in MME's fortunes is similar to that at Cardiff: the overwhelming majority of people passing through there were either public sector professionals travelling on work, or public sector leisure passengers off on their holidays. Unless something turns round soon, or the airport is willing to subsidise passenger operations very heavily with revenue from the other stuff it does (police helicopters, aircrew training etc.), I can't see it surviving for much longer.

I can't see it panning out any differently either. I use it regularly for work and I'll be sorry to see it go. I've also got a couple of good friends who work in ATC there, I guess they'll be even sorrier than me. :(

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The airport in Rhoose is twelve miles from Cardiff through winding country roads, nestling in countryside on the South Wales coast. Had direct rail or road links been built the airport would have gained prominence.

Building a new airport between Cardiff and Newport may be a better option given the availability of flat land and the proximity of the M4 and main Swansea to London railway. Relocating the airport there would make it a more attractive prospect to potential passengers in the West of England too.

This would be a good idea IMHO. Cardiff airport is a nightmare to get too. We always look at Birmingham/Bristol and don't give Cardiff a thought really.

If it were between Newport and Cardiff, on the Railway line, it would be better utilised I would imagine. It will never happen though.

Not that it really matters to me as I am petrified of flying and as such go abroad a lot less than I would do if I wasn't. My last flight was from Coventry to Portugal and the return flight was horrendous. Really bad weather, lightning and an aborted landing. Only chose Coventry as I had it in my mind that there was less chance of something going wrong.

Interesting Read on Durham Tees Valley's wikipedia page:

Passenger numbers peaked in 2006 when the airport was used by 917,963 passengers, but declined to 224,673 in 2010, the lowest level seen at the airport since 1975

It hasn't got a future, but the same is true of many UK airports.

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Just thought this deserved a mention. I think there will be future scrutiny about the price paid.

BBC News: Cardiff Airport is sold to the Welsh government for £52m

First Minister Carwyn Jones said it would not be operated by the government and would be managed "at arm's length" and "on a commercial basis". Mr Jones has been critical of the airport after a slump in passenger numbers from a peak of two million in 2007 to just over one million in 2012.

"However, the purchase price of £52m paid by the Welsh government - which is well above market value when compared to recent transactions involving UK airports - gives us concern that ongoing government involvement and support is highly likely," he said.

Cardiff airport has been sold by its debt-laden Spanish owner to the Welsh government for £52m.

http://www.guardian....elsh-government

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If Cardiff want to be it's own country one day, it's pretty vital that the airport be kept open and in good order.

Especially after the independence day when we English put up the fences and blow the 2 Severn bridges... their airport will become a vital link to the rest of Europe.

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