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New Take On The Slavebox

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Centuries ago, there was no such thing as a kitchen, a living room or a bedroom for anyone but the rich. There was a central hearth for warmth and to cook food, with straw-filled pallets laid on the floor for sleeping.

Over time, walls went up to divide the home into specialised areas - new rooms evolved, partly down to technology, but also to our changing attitudes to privacy, cleanliness and class.

Today, down the walls come again. Central heating and extractor fans mean we no longer need walls to keep heat in and cooking smells out.

And one room is heading for extinction, or at least being indistinguishable, says Lucy Worsley, curator of Historic Royal Palaces - the living room.

"We've passed the peak of the proliferation and specialisation of rooms which happened in the Victorian age: billiard rooms, morning rooms, parlours, studies. It was a use of space that's no longer affordable.

"The trend now is like a return to medieval living. I live in an open-plan flat with one central space. I use it for cooking, for eating, for watching TV - the modern equivalent of storytelling by the fire - and guests sleep on my sofa."

Obviously a "glass is half full" kind of girl.

She would make a great Estate Agent when she gives up "curating".

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BBC

Obviously a "glass is half full" kind of girl.

She would make a great Estate Agent when she gives up "curating".

TBH I'd happily settle for one large dining/kitchen/living area, rather than three small rooms. Not so sure about the communal bogs they mention though...

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TBH I'd happily settle for one large dining/kitchen/living area, rather than three small rooms. Not so sure about the communal bogs they mention though...

Personally I prefer to live in a place where I can watch the TV and have the washer dryer on at the same time, but it might be just me :)

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"We've passed the peak of the proliferation and specialisation of rooms which happened in the Victorian age: billiard rooms, morning rooms, parlours, studies. It was a use of space that's no longer affordable.

It would be great if the UK could go back to those days of proliferation when everybody had billiard rooms, morning rooms, parlours, studies. But if it's not affordable anymore then it's just not affordable.

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Number of rooms is secondary, what matters is square metres (or square feet for those who prefer imperial measures).

Fact is most UK flats and houses are way too small (the smallest in Europe), especially those built in the last 30 years.

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Centuries ago, there was no such thing as a kitchen, a living room or a bedroom for anyone but the rich. There was a central hearth for warmth and to cook food, with straw-filled pallets laid on the floor for sleeping.

....

"The trend now is like a return to medieval living. I live in an open-plan flat with one central space. I use it for cooking, for eating, for watching TV - the modern equivalent of storytelling by the fire - and guests sleep on my sofa."

At least they're letting people know the trend. Central "hearth" and straw filled pallets it is then.

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Number of rooms is secondary, what matters is square metres (or square feet for those who prefer imperial measures).

Fact is most UK flats and houses are way too small (the smallest in Europe), especially those built in the last 30 years.

You can buy a pig ark - a house for pigs to live in - 12 ft by 24 ft for £1000.

If we get used to living in teepees, the government will outlaw it.

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You can buy a pig ark - a house for pigs to live in - 12 ft by 24 ft for £1000.

If we get used to living in teepees, the government will outlaw it.

nah, they wouldn't outlaw it - just tax it.

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more positive spin on our increasing poverty. When i was a kid the phrase i kept hearing from the proud home owner is they had "wall to wall carpets" Nothing better especially in this climate. Now because of the price of decent carpet we've persuaded ourselves that really we prefer cold dusty fake plastic floorboards. Now that we can't afford decent sized kitchen, living and dining rooms we've convinced ourselves all we really want is a one room hut. Whatever. If it keeps us sane it must be a good thing.

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Personally I prefer to live in a place where I can watch the TV and have the washer dryer on at the same time, but it might be just me :)

Buy a miele and you probably can. Very quiet machines. Everytime I walk past the dishwasher I keep thinking I've forgot to put it on. 44db is about as loud as a whisper.

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Mama's got a slave box, she gets so depressed

And when Daddy comes home, he never gets no rest

'Cause she's crying all night, 'cos the money's so tight

Mama's got a slave box, Daddy gets no sex at night

Well, the kids don't eat and the dog can't sleep

There's no escape from the baliff in the whole damn street

'Cause she's crying all night and the money's so tight

Mama's got a slave box, Daddy never sleeps at night

Prozac goes in and out and in and out and in and out and in and out

She's tossing all night and the money's not right

Mama's got a slave box, Daddy gets no sex at night

She goes, squeeze me, come on and squeeze me

Come on and milk me like you do

I'm so in debt to you

Mama's got a slave box, Daddy gets no sex at night

------------------

To the tune of

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BBC

Obviously a "glass is half full" kind of girl.

She would make a great Estate Agent when she gives up "curating".

History is not a strong point of hers is it?

"Over time, walls went up to divide the home into specialised areas" :lol: There have been separate rooms in dwellings for well over 2000 years. Maybe her relatives lived in a shed with a grass roof but mine didnt.

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Number of rooms is secondary, what matters is square metres (or square feet for those who prefer imperial measures).

Fact is most UK flats and houses are way too small (the smallest in Europe), especially those built in the last 30 years.

My parents are just building a spacious but not ridiculous 1 bedroom studio here in Oz. Including the verandah, it is near about 160% of the size of the average new build in the UK. They can't quite believe that people manage to build 3 bedroom house in 75sqm. Having lived in them, neither can I.

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Central heating and extractor fans mean we no longer need walls to keep heat in and cooking smells out.

Very, very true - as long as you never actually cook :lol:

And don't mind a thin film of cooking fat eventually covering the whole house, rather than just the kitchen walls.

And don't mind having to always wash the pots straight after eating, as they'll stink the house out if you leave them dirty overnight.

And don't mind the noise of the clothes washer.

PS I currently live in an "open plan" house. If I owned the place, it would be top of my list of things to change :)

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Number of rooms is secondary, what matters is square metres (or square feet for those who prefer imperial measures).

Fact is most UK flats and houses are way too small (the smallest in Europe), especially those built in the last 30 years.

Totally agree.

As an architectural illustrator I've been dismayed (for the last 10+ years) at the plans I've seen screwing every millimeter of space out of a building, and can count on one hand the number of spatially reasonable developments I've seen. ~ I really don't know why 'slavebox architecture' hasn't become a term of scorn in the MSM, or Prince Charles for that matter. :unsure:

The BBC article is right in the sense that the 'living room' will largely be no more, and the living room in new-builds will be collapsed into one along with the dining and kitchen area. ~ These areas can indeed work brilliantly, with ample space, but I've only seen one good example of this.

Bottom line is: The planners need to regulate for minimum space requirements against unscruplulous tw*t developers.

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You can buy a pig ark - a house for pigs to live in - 12 ft by 24 ft for £1000.

If we get used to living in teepees, the government will outlaw it.

I've got an idea, how about buying a piece of land and putting a Yurt on it. After a bit you could build a brick wall on the inside, could be quite cozy!

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I really don't know why 'slavebox architecture' hasn't become a term of scorn in the MSM, or Prince Charles for that matter. :unsure:

'cos the luvvies who write these sort of articles let alone PC don't have to live in them.

And because the property pages are all funded by the various VI's who are desparate to shift them.

What a load of guff.

The average working peasant didn't have a parlour, billiard room, study, etc. They had a hovel, or a cottage.

Which'd now set you back £200,000 or more.

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YUP, there probably is a minimum floor area for a two bed house for the developers to work to. And they work to it minimally, by the millimetre.

Any more questions?

No. The minimum I wanted was a definitive answer.

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  • 312 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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