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ken_ichikawa

Getting Out Of A Piegeon Hole

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My CV has nigh on 5 years of accountancy practice on it.

Whenever I apply for a job outside of practice like industry or in a SME I am phoned back by a recruiter who offers to apply on my behalf a low paid accountancy practice job. (NMW or less vs the hours is normal) I don't want a practice job, it's low paid, monotonous and they always renege on pay increases and career prospects.

So simply how do you make that leap OUT of what I've been doing for years and hate with a passion into different but related roles? I've never managed to do this...

Any pointers?

Frank Hovis put it quite succinctly

Effectively doing piecemeal work that both the client and your employer want to pay the minimum amount of money for. You are not valued by any party whatso ever. Uf you are doing audit, you are frequently resented.

Thank you for reading.

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My CV has nigh on 5 years of accountancy practice on it.

Whenever I apply for a job outside of practice like industry or in a SME I am phoned back by a recruiter who offers to apply on my behalf a low paid accountancy practice job. (NMW or less vs the hours is normal) I don't want a practice job, it's low paid, monotonous and they always renege on pay increases and career prospects.

So simply how do you make that leap OUT of what I've been doing for years and hate with a passion into different but related roles? I've never managed to do this...

Any pointers?

Frank Hovis put it quite succinctly

Thank you for reading.

Why not go for an accounts role within a real small to medium sized company? You are ACCA qualified right? With 5 years practice experience you should be able to effectively do a management accountant / FC role within a small business. The money wont be great in your part of the world but you will be doing something of value to the business.

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pull the race card - your clearly qualified and experienced.

apply for jobs that you know you are qualified for using your real name and a pseudonym. sooner or later Ken Smith will get an interview over Ken Ichikawa and you can then sue the barstewards.

job done sail off into the sunset with your booty ;)

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Over egg that CV my man! Pump it up! Then live up to it.

Sometimes it is worth putting the cart before the horse.

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what colour is my parachute?

Oooh er, cryptic!

The problem Ken is that like me you are a thrillseeker. You'd rather be jumping out of planes over and above being imprisoned in a stuffy office and on the best days when you are stuck in doors you'll be taking it out on colleagues or simply walking out be it a £25k, £35k or £50k job.I know I have many times and my CV is a right mess for all my dilettanting over the years.

When you want to do your BASE jump from a paraglider get in touch with Mark Leavesley of Leavesley Aviation... fantastic guy who'll sort you out for sure ;)

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My CV has nigh on 5 years of accountancy practice on it.

Whenever I apply for a job outside of practice like industry or in a SME I am phoned back by a recruiter who offers to apply on my behalf a low paid accountancy practice job. (NMW or less vs the hours is normal) I don't want a practice job, it's low paid, monotonous and they always renege on pay increases and career prospects.

So simply how do you make that leap OUT of what I've been doing for years and hate with a passion into different but related roles? I've never managed to do this...

Any pointers?

Lie.

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Rebrand yourself by:

1. Creating a linkedin profile, write about your experience and what you now wish to do. In the 'Network actvity' start posting links to articles of interest on whatever it is you now wish to do.

2. Repeat the above but by creating a business linkedin profile - do the same as in 1.

3. Link in 1 & 2

4. Create a personal blog an start writing article about whatever it is you now wish to do.

5. Post blog articles on your linkedin profile.

6. Get your new CV out on monster, jobserve, jobsite.

7. Do other stuff - if you ask, I will tell you.

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Rebrand yourself by:

1. Creating a linkedin profile, write about your experience and what you now wish to do. In the 'Network actvity' start posting links to articles of interest on whatever it is you now wish to do.

2. Repeat the above but by creating a business linkedin profile - do the same as in 1.

3. Link in 1 & 2

4. Create a personal blog an start writing article about whatever it is you now wish to do.

5. Post blog articles on your linkedin profile.

6. Get your new CV out on monster, jobserve, jobsite.

7. Do other stuff - if you ask, I will tell you.

I did something like this, worked a treat (although this was before linkedin). Even though I know little more than the basics I'm a recognised world expert on a technology and when you type my name in to google there are hundreds of pages relating to me and that technology.

Once done I could just then pick and choose the jobs I wanted, even though I was no more and possibly less qualified than most of the candidates.

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Couple of thoughts Ken:

You keep going off and doing wild things. This may be, or rather is, very interesting down the pub but it is not what an interviewer wants to hear from a prospective member of their accounts team. They want somebody who will be there for a decent time. Motorbikes as a hobby - fine - keep mentioning past and planned marathon trips that involve taking serious time off work - fail.

Are you chasing the starting salary rather than taking the low paid job which will lead on to better things? I sent you one a couple of years ago that I would have said was an ideal pathway into a secure and reasonably well-paid sector but you weren't that interested.

I would recruit somebody from practice, but they don't tend to apply because I am offering less than they are currently on because they don't really have the right skill set. They know the technical rules but not how to operate in a company environment.

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You keep going off and doing wild things.

The thing is I've never walked out of a job to do this, everysingle one of my bike tours was done in booked off time and I never returned late. The big 2009 one was not an exception as I was pushed a couple months before thus I wasn't doing anything anyway. I don't tend to mention it unless asked what is this CV gap you have here?

Are you chasing the starting salary rather than taking the low paid job which will lead on to better things? I sent you one a couple of years ago that I would have said was an ideal pathway into a secure and reasonably well-paid sector but you weren't that interested.

I remember this it was at the end of 2008, I think at the time I wasn't so disillusioned with my job and felt there was some light at the end of the tunnel. Probably my cyncism too whereby although good prospects were implied as with everywhere else I suspected they would be reneged upon.

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I don't tend to mention it unless asked what is this CV gap you have here?

If you are handing in a CV with unexplained gaps in it, then I am unsurprised you find it difficult to get a job. I once temped in an HR place and when it comes to jobs with a high number of applications a gap in the CV is a red flag. It is not good in any event. Nobody is interested in working out why there is that gap in your CV when there are dozens of other applications to wade through. It is a great excuse to dump your application into the reject pile.

I'd imagine the real problem you have here is that you will be perceived as someone who skips from one job to another and won't be around long. Thrill seeking personalities and accountancy do not gel. You will be perceived as unreliable and risky. Your best bet is to drop the dead donkey and find a way of making money out of the things you enjoy.

Best of luck

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If you are handing in a CV with unexplained gaps in it, then I am unsurprised you find it difficult to get a job. I once temped in an HR place and when it comes to jobs with a high number of applications a gap in the CV is a red flag. It is not good in any event. Nobody is interested in working out why there is that gap in your CV when there are dozens of other applications to wade through. It is a great excuse to dump your application into the reject pile.

I'd imagine the real problem you have here is that you will be perceived as someone who skips from one job to another and won't be around long. Thrill seeking personalities and accountancy do not gel. You will be perceived as unreliable and risky. Your best bet is to drop the dead donkey and find a way of making money out of the things you enjoy.

Best of luck

I assume this is for permanent jobs ?

For contract/temporary work they don't seem to give a sh1t. I have many a gap in my CV and never had any issues.

Ken -get on the contract gravy train. Just work out how to get some 'Financial experience' on your CV and you will be sorted.

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I assume this is for permanent jobs ?

For contract/temporary work they don't seem to give a sh1t. I have many a gap in my CV and never had any issues.

Ken -get on the contract gravy train. Just work out how to get some 'Financial experience' on your CV and you will be sorted.

Temporary they don't care, because they expect you to leave anyway. I'd advise Ken to leave the job he is unsuited for and hates, personally. Longer term it might effect his mental health.

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Temporary they don't care, because they expect you to leave anyway. I'd advise Ken to leave the job he is unsuited for and hates, personally. Longer term it might effect his mental health.

...temporary jobs can turn into a permanent job if they like you and you like them....a foot into a good job on less can work out to be better than a short term bad job paying more. ;)

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Why don't you get yourself into Taiwan as you were talking about last year? Teach English for a while....

There's nothing down for you in this country it seems.

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  • 312 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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