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Austin Allegro

Your Recession Plan

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Any ideas for what you would do if you become permanently unemployed in some sort of Steinbeck-style long-term depression.

Mine would be to live with my mum (hopefully on the dole), and grow fruit and veg on a massive scale in her garden to feed ourselves and sell.

I also have an idea of a 'British Valet' service - basically working as a gentlemanly odd-job man for old people, doing jobs that don't require much skill or effort but which they can't easily do themselves, like changing lightbulbs, light gardening, maintenance etc, and having a list of reliable contacts to refer them to if I can't do the job. I reckon if you are polite and reliable, your reputation will spread through the old girl network of bingo, crown bowls, spiritualist chapels etc.

What are your plans...?

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Any ideas for what you would do if you become permanently unemployed in some sort of Steinbeck-style long-term depression.

Mine would be to live with my mum (hopefully on the dole), and grow fruit and veg on a massive scale in her garden to feed ourselves and sell.

I also have an idea of a 'British Valet' service - basically working as a gentlemanly odd-job man for old people, doing jobs that don't require much skill or effort but which they can't easily do themselves, like changing lightbulbs, light gardening, maintenance etc, and having a list of reliable contacts to refer them to if I can't do the job. I reckon if you are polite and reliable, your reputation will spread through the old girl network of bingo, crown bowls, spiritualist chapels etc.

What are your plans...?

I plan to rid of all liabilities including cars. I don't want any outgoings or any debt so will probably retreat to the family home.

Last year I bought myself a single speed hardtail high quality bike. I have brought all the componentry required to keep it running for years, as I intend to have this as my chief mode of transport when TSHF.

I have taught myself how to grow vegetables, make alcohol and make bread. And I will do this when I am unemployed.

Working out what to do for chief source of income WTSHF is a difficult one, because very few people will be able to afford "odd job" man, so really you need a skill which very few others possess and that skill must be a necessity. I am unskilled, hence why I have stocked up on silver and gold.

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Any ideas for what you would do if you become permanently unemployed in some sort of Steinbeck-style long-term depression.

Mine would be to live with my mum (hopefully on the dole), and grow fruit and veg on a massive scale in her garden to feed ourselves and sell.

I also have an idea of a 'British Valet' service - basically working as a gentlemanly odd-job man for old people, doing jobs that don't require much skill or effort but which they can't easily do themselves, like changing lightbulbs, light gardening, maintenance etc, and having a list of reliable contacts to refer them to if I can't do the job. I reckon if you are polite and reliable, your reputation will spread through the old girl network of bingo, crown bowls, spiritualist chapels etc.

What are your plans...?

Move in with Mum and Dad. Live off the rental profit on my house plus savings & investments in short to medium term.

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Working out what to do for chief source of income WTSHF is a difficult one, because very few people will be able to afford "odd job" man, so really you need a skill which very few others possess and that skill must be a necessity. I am unskilled, hence why I have stocked up on silver and gold.

Don't do yourself a downer, foresight, planning and execution are skills in themselves.

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Don't do yourself a downer, foresight, planning and execution are skills in themselves.

I don't see a massive SHF moment,or indeed a great price crash.It will be a long gradual downward drift.House prices eroded by inflation over a decade will make them 30-40% cheaper in real terms.Unemployment will rise inexorably and material living standards will reduce.By 2025 I think one in three will be jobless,another third on minimum wage while the top 10% will accrue even greater wealth.Personally I am just outside that 10% so on the tipping point,but I live frugally anyway as there isn't really anything I want.

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...I think our social way of living will change over the years, going back into the past more where extended families lived together, supporting each other. Some child caring others working, consolidating resources, housing costs heating and fuel costs together....will need larger housing units but would save costs and give a better quality of life overall when money is tight.....less insular, solitary living more generational community living. ;)

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I'm going to grow an orchard on my old mans land in zummerzet and work 'til I'm sore. Then I'll drink vats of rough cider, wake up, work 'til i'm sore again and repeat.

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Don't do yourself a downer, foresight, planning and execution are skills in themselves.

So is talking English , which puts you ahead of 99% of African immigrants to the UK.

It's ok though , i'm sure the govt prints benefit papers out in Swahili or whatever tribal language those people speak.

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In order for things to become as bad as described above, I assume that we won't have the house price crash and subsequent adjustment. In which case I am going to become an estate agent and sell fancy houses to all the rich foreigners that come along to scoop up the country.

Or I might have some self respect and just sit on my backside watching telly until I can start a business that will make money. I'm a software developer so as long as the power stays on I can write stuff until someone thinks it's worthy of buying.

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Suppose this isn't really the thread to say I want to buy a late 90's low miler M3 :o

I've got money put away for a cheap Jag if second hand values collapse. I retire in the summer this year and wont do any buisness miles any more so MPG wont be an issue. You can plan for stuff like that when you owe nothing.

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If anyone hasn't read 'Grapes of Wrath'. read it, then answer this question.

It's a book of real perspective. This recession is a piece of pi55 in comparison.

Second that. Steinbecks best.

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It hasn't really begun yet.

There's an interesting anecdote from an interview with Paul Tustain of Bullion Vault:

"This story comes from Portugal, back in, around about 1984 and if you know anything about Portuguese history, what happened to the Portuguese is their society essentially melted down in the 1970’s. Their politics, their budgets were all in a mess, their politics swung from extreme left to extreme right. The escudo, which is their currency then, rapidly devalued through inflation and the process pretty much wiped out the Portuguese middle classes. This meant that Portugal was in incredibly cheap place to visit in the early 1980’s when I was about twenty-three or twenty-four I guess. And a little group of friends, we used to like playing golf and bridge, we use to fly to Portugal on the Portuguese National Airline, which was TAP. And the Portuguese National Airline never had any Portuguese people on it at all and the reason was, that no Portuguese people could afford the plane ticket. So TAP was busily marketing to tourists from London, from Stockholm, from Paris, from Bonn and we were flying down to southern Portugal to play golf and in our case, bridge as well. Anyway, I had been doing this for two or three years and never had seen a Portuguese person on the plane. And I was sitting there one day when a 50 year-old guy was sitting down next to me and looked very, like he was doing very well. And the air assistant came up and asked him, well what would you like to drink, and he answered in Portuguese, which was a huge surprise to her because she had not had a Portuguese customer for years. And he was a very engaging traveling companion and we chatted for about two hours during the flight. And this guy has got a lesson for all of us because, in 1970, he had a concrete business. It was not a very big one, it was sort of you know, took after a small town in the south of Portugal. And he was making a bit of money but he was not a wealthy guy. And then one of the big local, regional companies decided to buy his business and he thought about it and then he thought well I actually, do not like the political or the economic situation here, it looks unstable. So he took the decision to sell. And he sold the business and he put all the proceeds into gold in Switzerland, mainly because he was not quite sure what to do.

Well, for the next ten years, the escudo went through the floor and of course gold, because of monetary concerns all over the place, it went up about 15 times in real terms. And that is in dollars, not in escudos. So at the end of 1980, this guy was so wealthy he went back to Portugal and he bought out the company which had bought him, with lots of change left over. So he got himself a 10-times bigger company and still got a whole lot of money in the bank. And then of course what happened is, a building boom took off because Portugal was recovering. So this was the guy who was taking concrete to all the villas that were being built in and around the south of Portugal when the area called the Algarve. And the reason I like this story is because the total failure of Portugal in that period, did not mean you needed a gun or a stockpile of food, there were still people driving around in Mercedes, just not very many of them. There are still businesses in Argentina for example, in 2001 when things melt down, there are still people, and it is a normal thing all over the World. There are a small proportion of wealthy people. And the currency devaluation in which I think we are going to experience, we should all view as a massive opportunity. Because if we understand it, we can effect the same switch in position from being relatively modest businessmen, to being one of the local tycoons, simply by sidestepping the slump that goes with currency devaluation. And then stepping back in when things improve. We do not need a gun and we do not need a stockpile of food, the best thing we need, is something like gold. I am not saying it has to be gold, but something like gold, which we have put out of harm’s way, that we can call on again when the time is right to invest in our local economies where we live. And create jobs for people and grow businesses all over again, perhaps for the second, or third, or fourth time."

The point of relaying this tale is that when TSHTF we won't necessarily descend into anarchy and civil breakdown. some of us may not be affected very much in any case. You can bet most of our politicians will cushion themselves from the drop in general living standards. Will the rest of us be able to prepare well enough to insulate ourselves?

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  • 276 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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