Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum
Sign in to follow this  
exiges

Halifax Hpi Out Today?

Recommended Posts

Exactly - it's never made clear what those in public service are "entilteld" to. I don't know what they (teachers, police, nurses, etc. get), but might include:

- "head of year" additional allowance;

- "head of department" additional allowance;

- Assembly duties additional allowance;

- An 'allowance' for unsociable hours;

- Sunday working allowance

- Field trip allowance

I just don't know, hence why I would like to see the actual "take home pay" figures for teachers / others, rather than the politically comfortable "basic salary" figures.

none of which are included in the main "salary" figures that are opsted.

Yes, I agree this kind of thing is a shame. Too much of the public sector has been infected with a culture of extra payments for things that should be part of doing your job properly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, I agree this kind of thing is a shame. Too much of the public sector has been infected with a culture of extra payments for things that should be part of doing your job properly.

I don't know if such allowances exist, and I don't really care - in some ways I agree with them, as they allow for a much more efficient payment mechanism for teachers, or allows them to opt in or out of certain activities if that's not their thing.

What I objuect to is the misinformation and half-truths that come out of their unions (and from governemnt) about the true level of their incomes - the basic slary figures previously quoted are often spewed out to show how hard done by our teachers / policemen / nurses are, but it's never made clear what their actual income is.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I hear you, mate...

Renting a lovely coutry house in Surrey at less than a 50% IO mortgage. No brainer!

Also love the bits of Silver... Bought a few kilo bars for a laugh 5 years ago for £245... selling for a cool £1k at the moment on eBay.

Anyway, enough smugness; just glad that most of us on here can every now and then get the feeling that we might just have done something right...

;)

+1. Hold on to them... you'll be able to exchange that silver for a similar house one day.

Edited by Constable

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For those of you who tweet

Joel Hills

@joelhills view full profile →

Sky News Business correspondent

Halifax says house prices fell 0.6% in first three months of this year. At 15.15 I'll speak to the man who says market will fall 10% in 2011

Nice!

Edit: Looks like his guest is Killer Bunny.

Edited by Caveat Mortgagor

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Exactly - it's never made clear what those in public service are "entilteld" to. I don't know what they (teachers, police, nurses, etc. get), but might include:

- "head of year" additional allowance;

- "head of department" additional allowance;

- Assembly duties additional allowance;

- An 'allowance' for unsociable hours;

- Sunday working allowance

- Field trip allowance

I just don't know, hence why I would like to see the actual "take home pay" figures for teachers / others, rather than the politically comfortable "basic salary" figures.

none of which are included in the main "salary" figures that are opsted.

Not to be too pedantic, I can well believe that some receive this but I'd like to see a link/some evidence for this...

My sister currently get's her 'extra allowance' by doing two hours of cleaning after school!

- Not being antagonistic. It's just; if true, then I'd like to give my sister some ammunition for her next review or whatever it is they do in schools.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

BBC: House prices 'marginally higher'

UK house prices rose by 0.1% in March on the previous month, says the Halifax, taking the average property price to £162,912.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Exactly - it's never made clear what those in public service are "entilteld" to. I don't know what they (teachers, police, nurses, etc. get), but might include:

- "head of year" additional allowance;

- "head of department" additional allowance;

Those aren't allowances, those are different jobs with different descriptions, involving managing other colleagues

- Assembly duties additional allowance;

- An 'allowance' for unsociable hours;

- Sunday working allowance

- Field trip allowance

I just don't know, hence why I would like to see the actual "take home pay" figures for teachers / others, rather than the politically comfortable "basic salary" figures.

none of which are included in the main "salary" figures that are opsted.

Err.... that's because they don't exist

This kind of la-la-land stuff fits in with the thread a few months ago where someone claimed they knew a newly qualified teacher who had become a deputy head in 2 years and was earing 60k!.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Those aren't allowances, those are different jobs with different descriptions, involving managing other colleagues

Err.... that's because they don't exist

This kind of la-la-land stuff fits in with the thread a few months ago where someone claimed they knew a newly qualified teacher who had become a deputy head in 2 years and was earing 60k!.

I admitted as such - my point was, as I have explained several times, is that the "salary band" information is frequently rolled out to show how hard done by teachers / soldiers / policemen / nurses are, but what needs to be given, to enable an informed position to be taken, is for them to show the actual take home incomes of teachers - I don't really care how it's broken down (or built up)

To not give the actual incomes is disingenuous too say the least and to publish the salary bands as if they were the total income is misinformation at its finest worst.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I admitted as such - my point was, as I have explained several times, is that the "salary band" information is frequently rolled out to show how hard done by teachers / soldiers / policemen / nurses are, but what needs to be given, to enable an informed position to be taken, is for them to show the actual take home incomes of teachers - I don't really care how it's broken down (or built up)

To not give the actual incomes is disingenuous too say the least and to publish the salary bands as if they were the total income is misinformation at its finest worst.

But I don't think there are extra allowances.

If you do extra things you go up a pay band.

And to put things in perspective my dad was the head of a department in a large school with about 5 members of staff to look after, huge amounts of extra responsibility, ran lots of extra curricular stuff and never reached the higher rate tax band.

And given everyone on here is on £70k plus for messing about with computers and posting on discussion forums all day I think he was worth it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I admitted as such - my point was, as I have explained several times, is that the "salary band" information is frequently rolled out to show how hard done by teachers / soldiers / policemen / nurses are, but what needs to be given, to enable an informed position to be taken, is for them to show the actual take home incomes of teachers - I don't really care how it's broken down (or built up)

To not give the actual incomes is disingenuous too say the least and to publish the salary bands as if they were the total income is misinformation at its finest worst.

The salary bands are the total incomes. There's no extras, no bonuses, no self-employed tax dodges. The numbers given in the pay scales on the previous pages are what teachers get. I don't see what you're so confused about.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wonder how many buy to lets this joker has :rolleyes:.

http://twitter.com/joelhills

@JonathanDavisWM Right, Davis. You around today? Let's get you on.

about 12 hours ago via web in reply to JonathanDavisWM

The man who is still predicting a crash in the housing market. His view: "we're toast". Interview online now. http://*******.com/5u7rqle

about 5 hours ago via web

An orchestrated public execution.

Nasty piece of work that Joel Hills.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Exactly - it's never made clear what those in public service are "entilteld" to. I don't know what they (teachers, police, nurses, etc. get), but might include:

- "head of year" additional allowance;

- "head of department" additional allowance;

- Sunday working allowance

All these things at my old school in the early 90s they used to do for free, for the love of their job, for the love of their sport or hobby they would run after shool clubs, for the love of giving that extra to kids and to their profession.

Yes, I agree this kind of thing is a shame. Too much of the public sector has been infected with a culture of extra payments for things that should be part of doing your job properly.

Sorry, as someone with many teacher friends I have to butt in here!!

(1) I'm quite sure your teachers in the 90s would be paid extra for extra responsibility. No-one is head of department in school for "love of the job" any more than you would be head of department in your job without appropriate pay.

(2) One friend was head of department, and was working huge hours during the term, plus most of their summer "holiday". The head of department allowance was tiny.

my dad was the head of a department in a large school with about 5 members of staff to look after, huge amounts of extra responsibility, ran lots of extra curricular stuff and never reached the higher rate tax band.

And given everyone on here is on £70k plus for messing about with computers and posting on discussion forums all day I think he was worth it.

+1

I think most office workers have absolutely no idea how hard teaching is. In an office you can get a drink, go to the loo, have a quiet moment to think or a cheeky look on the internet any time you like.

As a teacher you have 20-30 teenage kids watching your every move and word for an hour, followed by another lot, then another lot. Then it's lunch time with 20 mins to eat lunch and 40 mins lunch duty, another barrage of kids and then when they finally go home 2-3 hours marking that MUST be done before they come back the next day. You can't just extend the deadline at school - the exam WILL be on XX June so you HAVE to have taught them everything by then.

If you're tired (and you will be), you can't just take a day off - sorry: half term is 4 weeks away. You are working every weekday, and possibly most Saturdays on the sports field, until then.

There is no such thing as a "quiet day in the office" at school. There is no hope that tomorrow might be a bit easier - every day is timetabled full of lessons.

As head of department, you can also throw in setting the schedule of work, ordering textbooks, performance management for X other teachers and being point of contact for any irate parent complaining about any lesson in your subject.

Seriously, if you have an office job, spend a few hours chatting to a teacher about their job and you will never complain about yours being hard work again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry, as someone with many teacher friends I have to butt in here!!

(1) I'm quite sure your teachers in the 90s would be paid extra for extra responsibility. No-one is head of department in school for "love of the job" any more than you would be head of department in your job without appropriate pay.

(2) One friend was head of department, and was working huge hours during the term, plus most of their summer "holiday". The head of department allowance was tiny.

+1

I think most office workers have absolutely no idea how hard teaching is. In an office you can get a drink, go to the loo, have a quiet moment to think or a cheeky look on the internet any time you like.

As a teacher you have 20-30 teenage kids watching your every move and word for an hour, followed by another lot, then another lot. Then it's lunch time with 20 mins to eat lunch and 40 mins lunch duty, another barrage of kids and then when they finally go home 2-3 hours marking that MUST be done before they come back the next day. You can't just extend the deadline at school - the exam WILL be on XX June so you HAVE to have taught them everything by then.

If you're tired (and you will be), you can't just take a day off - sorry: half term is 4 weeks away. You are working every weekday, and possibly most Saturdays on the sports field, until then.

There is no such thing as a "quiet day in the office" at school. There is no hope that tomorrow might be a bit easier - every day is timetabled full of lessons.

As head of department, you can also throw in setting the schedule of work, ordering textbooks, performance management for X other teachers and being point of contact for any irate parent complaining about any lesson in your subject.

Seriously, if you have an office job, spend a few hours chatting to a teacher about their job and you will never complain about yours being hard work again.

I don't actually give a fling feck about how hard a teaching job is - al I'd like to see is some genuine information about their salary.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't actually give a fling feck about how hard a teaching job is - al I'd like to see is some genuine information about their salary.

Surely you should care about the nature of the job if you care about the salary? The two are related. My point is - whatever the exact £ figure they get paid it's not a lot for what they do.

If you're worried about public sector salaries that are too high, teaching is a red herring.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Surely you should care about the nature of the job if you care about the salary? The two are related. My point is - whatever the exact £ figure they get paid it's not a lot for what they do.

If you're worried about public sector salaries that are too high, teaching is a red herring.

+1 teaching is very hard and poorly paid.

The starting salary of a Newly Qualified Teacher should be much higher than £21,588k. I would make the PGCE a 2 year course rather than just 1 year; making it more difficult to pass and giving more intensive training to improve the quality and rention of our teachers. I would also pay them a starting salary of 30k a year.

P.S. I'm not a teacher. I get paid to work on a PC most of the day

Edited by Unsafe As Houses

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think most office workers have absolutely no idea how hard teaching is. In an office you can get a drink, go to the loo, have a quiet moment to think or a cheeky look on the internet any time you like.

As a teacher you have 20-30 teenage kids watching your every move and word for an hour, followed by another lot, then another lot. Then it's lunch time with 20 mins to eat lunch and 40 mins lunch duty, another barrage of kids and then when they finally go home 2-3 hours marking that MUST be done before they come back the next day. You can't just extend the deadline at school - the exam WILL be on XX June so you HAVE to have taught them everything by then.

If you're tired (and you will be), you can't just take a day off - sorry: half term is 4 weeks away. You are working every weekday, and possibly most Saturdays on the sports field, until then.

There is no such thing as a "quiet day in the office" at school. There is no hope that tomorrow might be a bit easier - every day is timetabled full of lessons.

As head of department, you can also throw in setting the schedule of work, ordering textbooks, performance management for X other teachers and being point of contact for any irate parent complaining about any lesson in your subject.

Seriously, if you have an office job, spend a few hours chatting to a teacher about their job and you will never complain about yours being hard work again.

Great post. What with the problems of dealing with children and unfortunately, the increasing threat of violence in schools nowadays, I can barely think of a worse job to have. I hope they get good pay.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I admitted as such - my point was, as I have explained several times, is that the "salary band" information is frequently rolled out to show how hard done by teachers / soldiers / policemen / nurses are, but what needs to be given, to enable an informed position to be taken, is for them to show the actual take home incomes of teachers - I don't really care how it's broken down (or built up)

To not give the actual incomes is disingenuous too say the least and to publish the salary bands as if they were the total income is misinformation at its finest worst.

teachers who took up their roles more than 2 to 3 years ago seem to be on very good salaries, ones I know

I gather from web evidence that teachers who took up roles since then are on much lower salaries given their effective responsibilities, I imagine there is flex in the pay-scales, pretty much when the public sector party ended, with Alistair Darling's first budget

the one head of a department I know is on over 45k, admittedly for lots of hours, from 3 years ago

Edited by Si1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • 297 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.