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garybug

Buying A New Drill

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I've got a cordless B&D 11V(?) drill, which is fine for most things but has come up short trying to screw 4" woodscrews into my struggling fence panels.

I'm thinking of buying a corded type with much more oomph, as I will also want to drill masonary to insert bolts for gates etc. Had a look at Argos to see the different types, but a bit bewildered eg. are SDS way over spec?

I know the good brands (De Walt, Makita, Ryobi), but the power figures quoted mean nothing to me relative to what I want to do. Budget would be £100 tops.

Ta muchly...

gb

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Cordless De Walts and Makita are both excellent and will be fine for most DIY/professional jobs. They now come with lithium batteries which generally give a bit more power. The power will mostly depend on the voltage of the battery e.g 18v has more power than 12v. Batteries will also be rated in Mah, the larger this figure means more time between charges. Litium batteries will not lose their charge when left for long periods of time

If your drilling into masonry etc a decent e.g Black and Decker mains powered drill will be fine for most DIY applications, but are generally not suitable when you need more control. A lot of problems when drilling are caused because of cheap and blunt bits.

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Personally, I think it is worth getting an sds because once you have it then it is always there. If you arent going to use it a lot then there is no point in blowing a fortune so have a look at screwfix instead of getting screwed over by argos.

Take a look at these http://www.screwfix.com/c/tools/sds-plus-3-function/cat830826?_dyncharset=UTF-8&_dynSessConf=8247509028275888428&sortBy=price or this for a cordless http://www.screwfix.com/p/evolution-build-sds4-800-2kg-sds-plus-hammer-drill-110v/82939.

Or, have a look around B&Q and if you arent sure then go to the trade counter and ask one of the old boys your questions.

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To drill into various types of masonry, you really need an SDS drill and I would sugest a makita or bosch. To screw into fence posts without the need for pilot holes with a 4 inch screw, an impact driver is ideal. What you ideally need is two different drills but the corded SDS could do both and cost about £100. Dont bother with cordless unless you regularly uses it for work.

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A drill for screws? How decadent are you? Theres things called screw drivers and hands, your hand and properly fitting screw drivers will put in and remove any screw more so than an electric one.

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I've got a cordless B&D 11V(?) drill, which is fine for most things but has come up short trying to screw 4" woodscrews into my struggling fence panels.

I'm thinking of buying a corded type with much more oomph, as I will also want to drill masonary to insert bolts for gates etc. Had a look at Argos to see the different types, but a bit bewildered eg. are SDS way over spec?

I know the good brands (De Walt, Makita, Ryobi), but the power figures quoted mean nothing to me relative to what I want to do. Budget would be £100 tops.

Ta muchly...

gb

Is your problem with screwing rather than drilling? If the screws won't go in then a more powerful drill will probably just shear the screws. In that case just drill a pilot hole first - which should be slightly smaller diameter than the shank of the screws (the solid bit down the middle).

SDS will make masonary drilling much faster, but if you are only looking to do a few holes in brick then a £30 drill with a hammer setting is enough. I used to go down the route of expensive power tools but tend to go for the cheapest that will do the job these days. They don't last as long but they are so cheap that you end up paying less overall, and generally get the job done. Most of the midprice stuff from people like B&D, Bosch, De Walt, etc are all pretty crap these days - if you are going for that you may as well go for screwfix or b&q own brand stuff for half the price. .

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Thanks all for your responses. A trip to B&Q is in the offing for some initial advice, but I think I will go down the 'affordable' SDS route at Screwfix & invest in a decent set of bits too.

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I loathe cheap tools, often either ineffective or plain dangerous

Most of the power stuff (I would go as far to say all the stuff) you are likely to find at Homebase, B&Q, Argos etc is only intended for light DIY,

While all cheap drills are all OK for drilling a hole in pine, or putting a screw in afterwards, ultimately, one day you may well want a tool that will do some more serious work, and then you will wish you had either something competent or that wasn't part broken in the cupboard.

and the apparently cheap bundles of known brands like DeWalt etc at Screwfix were never made to sell at the rather imaginative RRPs they list. A DFS sofa anyone ? The proper pro-tools by the same manufacturers are rarely reduced by Screwfix by as much as 50%. If you feel you want a deal, choose something realistic, say 20% of the price of the quality drill, such as a set of drill bits and drivers, and ask for it to be included for free. Win-win for you and them.

Can't recommend the Hitachi I linked above highly enough, will easily drill concrete and drive screws through steel without pre-drilling. Timber is always different because of the moisture and density, and invariably you will need a pilot for larger screws, for as another poster said, you will shear the cheap screws that are marketed today.

You can't beat going to an independent power tool retailer, not only will you get good advice but they are often cheaper too (I am not an independent power tool retailer).

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You really want two "drills", one a drill and one a driver. Keep the B&D cordless - it will still do 90% of your screwdriving unless the the batteries are knackered. Alternatively pilot drill holes for the bigger screws, the cordless will be fine with the right pilot drill being used.

Then buy a bosch SDS corded + a SDS chuck adapter (for non sds bits and screwdriving bits) - get a 3 mode one, hammer, drill and hammer only for chiselling. Keep to low speed when screwdriving.

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I've got a cordless B&D 11V(?) drill, which is fine for most things but has come up short trying to screw 4" woodscrews into my struggling fence panels.

Are you drilling pilot holes? If not ensure you are using self drilling screws. If you are and are struggling get some decent quality drill bits!

As for drilling into masonry, try what you have with a decent bit, but if you do need more juice an SDS will make short work of pretty much anything. I went makita and am now a big fan. Old bosch mains drill just bent the bits, new makita sds goes through like butter - absolutely amazing, makes you want to put extra holes in for fun...

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Cheap drills are crap. Case in point - you might think your 11V drill is about the same as my 12V one...but mine can screw 8" lag bolts into old railway sleepers with ease. Now, mine is a Festool and cost £300...but it does the job.

For what you want, I'd get a DeWalt 18v, not the SDS version. It is a very good all rounder, will drive and drill with ease. SDS versions are very good at drilling masonry, and if I want to drill something long/wide in masonry, I'll go for the SDS every time. If I want a driver, or just to put rawlplugs in masonry, then I'll choose the standard one.

Yes, outside budget, but it will last you for ages, and you won't need to buy another one. They are often cheap on ebay....like this

http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/GENUINE-DEWALT-18V-COMBI-DRILL-DC988-DC988N-BARE-UK-/130457048862?pt=UK_Home_Garden_PowerTools_SM&hash=item1e5fd8971e#ht_2260wt_1096

You need a battery an charger as well, again, can be picked up cheap

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I disagree with some of those that enjoy spending vast amounts on tools. Aside from the fact that the op doesnt sound like he is likely to use the drill enough to warrant spending out on something that a tradesman would require for daily use.

I have an unknown cheap sds, the make is blackspur or something like that and I think it cost me under £60. It is 7 years old now, has chased out miles of wall, broken a lot of concrete and been through more brick than the luftwaffe. If it breaks then so what, it doesnt owe me anything and I will get another cheap one.

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just a couple of things

- I use a candle to grease wood screws so they go in easier ... altho a pilot hole

helps a lot

- a few years back I was trying to decide what to buy from the pov of drilling

masonry and particularly a extractor fan hole . Some guy wrote that he used

an sds drill for this sort of job , ie drill the holes around the hole, and then use

the chisel to take it out and clean it up . So I bought an sds drill with chisel and

it worked for me.

Maybe for what you want is another drill and use one for the pilot holes and tother

for driving the screws :)

cheers,

rockhopper

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I bought a second hand 500w Bosch from Cash Converters 13 years ago. It has served all my DIY drilling needs since. Before you buy check the bearings in the chuck for lateral play and get them to plug it in so you can check that the trigger still works progressively. I'm not claiming it's the best in the world or anything but it will drill masonry and drive a 4'' screw into wood.

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I disagree with some of those that enjoy spending vast amounts on tools. Aside from the fact that the op doesnt sound like he is likely to use the drill enough to warrant spending out on something that a tradesman would require for daily use.

I have an unknown cheap sds, the make is blackspur or something like that and I think it cost me under £60. It is 7 years old now, has chased out miles of wall, broken a lot of concrete and been through more brick than the luftwaffe. If it breaks then so what, it doesnt owe me anything and I will get another cheap one.

Some a good/ok, some are junk - it is the pot luck factor. A decent bosch at around than £100 - which is less in real terms than you paid for the one you have should under diy conditions last a lifetime pretty much. As mentioned earlier can make great second hand buys - I bought one at auction toegther with a honking great big drill stand for £15. From my experinece steer well clear of hitachi sds drills - broke the hammer on mine within months, their cricular saws are robust though. It is worth spending the money on a decent corded becuase its life is not retricted by the life/availability of replacement batteries.

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Some a good/ok, some are junk - it is the pot luck factor. A decent bosch at around than £100 - which is less in real terms than you paid for the one you have should under diy conditions last a lifetime pretty much. As mentioned earlier can make great second hand buys - I bought one at auction toegther with a honking great big drill stand for £15. From my experinece steer well clear of hitachi sds drills - broke the hammer on mine within months, their cricular saws are robust though. It is worth spending the money on a decent corded becuase its life is not retricted by the life/availability of replacement batteries.

Bosch is not the same as it was ten years ago. I think that most of their products are pretty crap these days. Most of the mid range stuff is pretty much identical if you compare it, other than the colour (De Walt, Bosch, Black & Decker etc). My best drill is a black and decker, but it's a thirty or forty year old one that was properly made. These days either buy cheap, or go top of the line. The middle is shit.

Personally I go cheap for most things, but put money in where I think it counts (compound mitre saw where money buys accuracy, router bits, hand planes, chisels etc). My drills are cheap as chips, but then I don't try and drill masonry or screw in eight inch bolts with a cordless. I have corded for that type of work. The added advantage of going cheap is you can buy more. There is an advantage of having a couple of screwdrivers and a couple of drills all with different bits so that you don't have to keep chopping and changing on a job that requires that sort of thing (eg swtiching back and forth between pilot and clearance and screw stuff in in the meantime).

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Bosch is not the same as it was ten years ago. I think that most of their products are pretty crap these days. Most of the mid range stuff is pretty much identical if you compare it, other than the colour (De Walt, Bosch, Black & Decker etc). My best drill is a black and decker, but it's a thirty or forty year old one that was properly made. These days either buy cheap, or go top of the line. The middle is shit.

Personally I go cheap for most things, but put money in where I think it counts (compound mitre saw where money buys accuracy, router bits, hand planes, chisels etc). My drills are cheap as chips, but then I don't try and drill masonry or screw in eight inch bolts with a cordless. I have corded for that type of work. The added advantage of going cheap is you can buy more. There is an advantage of having a couple of screwdrivers and a couple of drills all with different bits so that you don't have to keep chopping and changing on a job that requires that sort of thing (eg swtiching back and forth between pilot and clearance and screw stuff in in the meantime).

See where you are coming from, difficult to disagree - there have been some significant quality changes and looks can be deceptive. The increasing price disparity between real high end kit and the lower / middle end probably reflects the point you make.

My pet hate is blow moulded cases (usually reflected in the quality of the tool).

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Some a good/ok, some are junk - it is the pot luck factor. A decent bosch at around than £100 - which is less in real terms than you paid for the one you have should under diy conditions last a lifetime pretty much. As mentioned earlier can make great second hand buys - I bought one at auction toegther with a honking great big drill stand for £15. From my experinece steer well clear of hitachi sds drills - broke the hammer on mine within months, their cricular saws are robust though. It is worth spending the money on a decent corded becuase its life is not retricted by the life/availability of replacement batteries.

I agree entirely. It may be a bit of pot luck with cheaper drills but if they fail then it is no big deal and the chances are that 2 cheap ones are still cheaper than a really good one and would probably last as long.

I have used a lot of drills in work and have binned a couple of hitachi's within 6 months. I also binned 2 makita 24v cordless sds's aswell that were burnt out within a year - great drills but had I paid for them then it would have hurt. I have a couple of dewalts myself that have never let me down but word is that the newer stuff is crap.

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My pet hate is blow moulded cases (usually reflected in the quality of the tool).

I got given two cordless screwdrivers for christmas a few years ago. One was a bosch I think, the other was a cheap market job - power devil or the like. They were identical down to the pattern moulded in to the plastic of the grip. Both made in mexico, identical in ever other way other than that one was red and one was green and the green one cost twice as much as the red one.

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I agree entirely. It may be a bit of pot luck with cheaper drills but if they fail then it is no big deal and the chances are that 2 cheap ones are still cheaper than a really good one and would probably last as long.

I have used a lot of drills in work and have binned a couple of hitachi's within 6 months. I also binned 2 makita 24v cordless sds's aswell that were burnt out within a year - great drills but had I paid for them then it would have hurt. I have a couple of dewalts myself that have never let me down but word is that the newer stuff is crap.

Yup I've had bad luck with hitachi angle grinders. Killed two in about a month. Admittedly I was doing a lot of steel cutting at the time but nonetheless I expected better.

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There is an advantage of having a couple of screwdrivers and a couple of drills all with different bits so that you don't have to keep chopping and changing on a job that requires that sort of thing (eg swtiching back and forth between pilot and clearance and screw stuff in in the meantime).

Which is why a swappable chuck system like Festool Centrotec is such a good idea.

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I have walked into a "hole drilling fetishist web site"! You should get out more, and concentrate less on making holes! :unsure:

My 25 year old Swiss made Bosch drill is still going! :blink:

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I have walked into a "hole drilling fetishist web site"! You should get out more, and concentrate less on making holes! :unsure:

My 25 year old Swiss made Bosch drill is still going! :blink:

I found mine on blueberry hill.

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