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anonon

Retraining As A Chiropractor

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Hi,

I'm new to this forum! I have spent the last couple of days reading through various topics and I get the general impression that there are a lot of smart and educated people here. With that said, I'm looking for some advice. I have been stuck in a lot of dead end jobs, mostly in IT ( technician roles etc) and I'm fed up. I want a change, and I have been looking at alternative careers that I could train for. After spending time trawling through careers sites and a few tests, I think that a career as a Chiropractor could be a good match. I would have to take time to train and spend money, but that would be the case with any new career. When I was younger (I'm 30) I did some alternative therapy training, and found that it was helpful to me. I do have an interest in this field, so it seems a good fit. I don't really have many people that I can trust to offer me advice, the only one I have in my life that seems to know me is my brother (he fixes boilers exclusively and seems to enjoy it) and he recommended I train for that, but I don't really feel as if it is my sort of thing. Plus he won't tell me how much he earns!! So, what do you think hpc? Would my plan be a good idea? Is a Chiropractor something that you would pay for? I'm especially interested to hear from anyone who is actually in the field.

Anyway, I have rambled on but I'm hoping this all makes sense.

A

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Chiropractors arent recognised as a treatment by some private health insurance. I have forked out for 6months worth of treatment for a bad back due to be being infront of the computer so much and no you cant claim it back from work according to my accountant (I work for myself) which is contrary to what the chiro told me, but ultimately all I had to do was drink more water so my spinal discs werent deflating.

He's lousy then, as I would have maybe put it in as P11d benefit and take the class 1A hit.

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Hi,

I'm new to this forum! I have spent the last couple of days reading through various topics and I get the general impression that there are a lot of smart and educated people here. With that said, I'm looking for some advice. I have been stuck in a lot of dead end jobs, mostly in IT ( technician roles etc) and I'm fed up. I want a change, and I have been looking at alternative careers that I could train for. After spending time trawling through careers sites and a few tests, I think that a career as a Chiropractor could be a good match. I would have to take time to train and spend money, but that would be the case with any new career. When I was younger (I'm 30) I did some alternative therapy training, and found that it was helpful to me. I do have an interest in this field, so it seems a good fit. I don't really have many people that I can trust to offer me advice, the only one I have in my life that seems to know me is my brother (he fixes boilers exclusively and seems to enjoy it) and he recommended I train for that, but I don't really feel as if it is my sort of thing. Plus he won't tell me how much he earns!! So, what do you think hpc? Would my plan be a good idea? Is a Chiropractor something that you would pay for? I'm especially interested to hear from anyone who is actually in the field.

Anyway, I have rambled on but I'm hoping this all makes sense.

A

My mums chiropracter treats humans and horses and is raking it in - I beleive it's called the mctimoney method.

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My mums chiropracter treats humans and horses and is raking it in - I beleive it's called the mctimoney method.

It's called the Codswallop Method, that's why insurers won't pay out for the mumbo jumbo.

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Are you good with your hands ? Quite strong ? If so then sports deep tissue massage may be a better option. I have been to a lot and the ones that really know what they are doing/are not shy about getting stuck in - I will always gop back to.

Doesnt sound like easy work though. It costs £40 per hour though so if you are very good and get good contacts - you cuold rake it in. All you need is the table (That you can get fold up to fit in a bigt rucksack) and the massage oils/cream. Then you could also think about going to people to do it rather than getting them to come to you.

I imagine getting the foot in the door and the experience/contacts would be the difficult thing.

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I imagine getting the foot in the door and the experience/contacts would be the difficult thing.

A fellow skydiver used to be a physio for several football clubs, its where he got his contacts from. He says without these contacts and famous people using him he'd be broke.

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A fellow skydiver used to be a physio for several football clubs, its where he got his contacts from. He says without these contacts and famous people using him he'd be broke.

Yep lots of people do it. However I don't think that deep tissue massage is quite as common so could have more opportunities. Physios are ten a penny.

When you train to be a masseuse you need to put the practice in so plenty of volunteers on family and friends is where most of it starts from. If you get good your reputation speaks for itself but given the choice between chiro or masseuse I'd train to be a masseuse as like another poster pointed out, if you get good the customers will just flock.

I still havent found a decent masseuse to replace the one I used to see every week when I lived in Norwich, she was very good combining the oils with different massage techniques to suit your individual requirements, like deep tissue & hot stones for your back and shiatsu for the rest of the body for example.

Yep a good one is worth keeping. I do alot of sports so on occasion get a really deep massage. Can be painful but works wonders. Some people prefer it ia big more gentle and relaxing. If you make a name for yourself as really deep/strong then you will have triathletes, swimmers, hard core runners using you regulalry - and more importantly telling their mates about you.

I do it myself. Of course you could do the nice pleasant sort of massage stuff. But then again - like Physios - I think that is so common they are ten a penny to.

Proper hard core Eastern European style deep tissue massage. That is my personal guess of a good way to go. Certainly not enough of them around in Edinburgh. Very difficult to find one - which bodes well if you want to become one.

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A friend of mine was a senior IT bod when he was crossing the road in Yugoslavia,got hit by a car and spent the next year fighting to stay alive.

He subsequently retrained as an osteopath who uses aspects of chiropracty (Is that a word?) and is now incredibly happy.

He has been slowly building up a client base in the area, mainly via website and word of mouth, and is doing well now. It was slow at first because he was competing with already established people in the area.

I know one osteopath in my area who is constantly booked.

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Thank you to those that have replied so far. I must admit that I'm not really that physically strong - I have very long,thin hands, and maybe (I don't know this for sure) they wouldn't be suitable for heavy work. It has definitely given me something to think about, as I imagine that a job that needs strong hands would be quite painful if your hands are bony and weak (like mine). I do, however, need to get something moving with regards to a career path, and now is the best time. I actually think I will spend some time searching for careers that need great manual dexterity, it's another direction to look in.

I didn't really do well in mainstream education - I was advised that I would never amount to anything and that I should be happy with working in a corner shop all my life. The psychologist that I was referred to disagreed, because when he tested me my IQ was high enough to get me into Mensa (not that I even knew what that was at the time). I'm just quite lost really, and I'm sure that a lot of people feel this way. I'd really appreciate hearing from any career switchers who have found success or happiness. That's really my aim.

Thanks,

A

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I have been renting for 3 years now and have had boiler men out form British gas about 2 or 3 times year - all are very happy in their jobs, no stress, work within a 15 mile radius and earning very good money for what is not a very taxing job.

If I could train to do that now I would.

I have friends and an ex girlfriend who were professional masseurs - it is only a short term thing as eventually the knuckles go and most have to quit by early 50s. Rheumatism is often the result.

Boilers are always going to be in - for the next 30 years anyhow - so your brother is going to have plenty of work, will earn good money and will then be able to do what he wants with his spare time.

I am currently getting my IT career back and up running - lots of learning and relearning constantly, no work in my area so I have to travel long distances, stress of being self-employed, etc, etc. I wish I could have trained to fix gas boilers.

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As for the person who said that you would not amount to anything - what a cruel, torturous thing to say to anyone least of all a child?

Was that a teacher?

You know, such people who say such things do it for one or several of the following reasons.

1. Jealousy.

2. Their own hang-ups - such as their own low self-esteem, being told themselves that they would amount to nothing.

3. Just plain, nasty evil feckers such as narcissists.

You have to learn to let what was said to you go. You have to realise that what they said is their problem and their hang-ups. If anything, pity them and promise not to treat

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As for the person who said that you would not amount to anything - what a cruel, torturous thing to say to anyone least of all a child?

Was that a teacher?

You know, such people who say such things do it for one or several of the following reasons.

1. Jealousy.

2. Their own hang-ups - such as their own low self-esteem, being told themselves that they would amount to nothing.

3. Just plain, nasty evil feckers such as narcissists.

You have to learn to let what was said to you go. You have to realise that what they said is their problem and their hang-ups. If anything, pity them and promise not to treat

My teacher said that to me, and ALL chinese parents will tell their children that as well.

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My teacher said that to me, and ALL chinese parents will tell their children that as well.

I had several teachers and one headmaster who said it to me - as well as being nasty, cruel fecks.

It affected my entire childhood, my teenage and my adult years until 3 or 4 years ago... at which point, I realised that the problem was them and not me. That they had some serious issues of their own.

I used to think, and indeed hope, that there was some kind of special hell for them... until I realised that they had created it here... and now I try to pity them and hope that they can change for the better in this life or the next.

More often than we realise but this kind of cr*p is passed down from generation to generation and could have been going on for centuries. Someone, somewhere, somehow has to break the loop eventually.

I also realised at an early age that a lot of kids were just fecked up nasty feckers waiting to turn into nasty adult feckers. I, again, now try to pity such people and hope they come to see the errors of their way.

Ken - don't tell you kids such things. Break the cycle.

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I have given this route a thought myself briefly.

Our osteopath is fully booked - always. I make it they're taking in £500 a day. Bad backs, whiplash etc. There will always be customers and repeat business.

How brave are you about setting up your own practice? Is there another osteopath you could go into partnership with? Visit your local osteopath/chiropracter and make some enquiries. The good thing is you can set up, off the highstreet, so rates are lower.

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  • 276 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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