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http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1372926/Felice-Cohen-describes-miniature-90ft-home-Is-Americas-smallest-apartment.html

"Felice Cohen has squeezed her life into a 90 square ft flat even though it has no kitchen and a bed whose ceiling is 23 inches from her face.

The bathroom is so small that she has to sit sideways to go to the toilet and on her first night there she suffered a panic attack because it is so cramped."

I wouldnt normally have bothered posting this but I built a rabbit run this weekend that was 10'x10' and 6' high and still thought "that's a bit small" yet still wondered if someone could live in that space".

Along comes the daily mail this morning with a story about someone is living in 90sqft.

I wonder what housing space per person was 100 years ago. One of my grandparents was one of 9 brothers and sisters living in a 3-bed semi as a child so that works out at around 1000sqft/11 => 90sqft each.

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"Felice Cohen has squeezed her life into a 90 square ft flat even though it has no kitchen and a bed whose ceiling is 23 inches from her face.

The bathroom is so small that she has to sit sideways to go to the toilet and on her first night there she suffered a panic attack because it is so cramped."

Anyone in a caravan or canal boat knows about living in that space. Some people do that long-term (most obviously travelers).

I wouldnt normally have bothered posting this but I built a rabbit run this weekend that was 10'x10' and 6' high and still thought "that's a bit small" yet still wondered if someone could live in that space".

The big difference is whether you're caged in, or get the option to go out. Ms Cohen is presumably the latter.

Even so, rather her than me. Though if her little pad were somewhere really nice I might be tempted to revise that view!

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http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1372926/Felice-Cohen-describes-miniature-90ft-home-Is-Americas-smallest-apartment.html

"Felice Cohen has squeezed her life into a 90 square ft flat even though it has no kitchen and a bed whose ceiling is 23 inches from her face.

The bathroom is so small that she has to sit sideways to go to the toilet and on her first night there she suffered a panic attack because it is so cramped."

I wouldnt normally have bothered posting this but I built a rabbit run this weekend that was 10'x10' and 6' high and still thought "that's a bit small" yet still wondered if someone could live in that space".

Along comes the daily mail this morning with a story about someone is living in 90sqft.

I wonder what housing space per person was 100 years ago. One of my grandparents was one of 9 brothers and sisters living in a 3-bed semi as a child so that works out at around 1000sqft/11 => 90sqft each.

Interesting, I suspect it was the same for adults. But more children shared bedrooms then.

Looking at the 1910 census returns for my family, the houses my grand and great-grandparents lived in are still standing today in and around London or the South Coast. Although they had modest occupations and largish families they were able to live in Victorian terraces or Cottages, some of which are now in very desirable areas (Putney, Dulwich,Brighton etc). Apart from the outside loo they had alot of space, high ceilings etc, biggish gardens etc. By the 1930's, still in modest occupations, they were living in more suburban homes far larger than the average square footage of todays new builds.

Things went backwards during and after WW2 though

Progress in technology, plumbing and better insulation aside we are no better off on the housing front these days if you take square footage as the main measure

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This is the choice of the future.

If you want privacy you give up space and have micro-accomodation, if you want space you give up privacy and live in a shared household. If you want both space and privacy you need to be in the top 20% of earners. If you're in the bottom 20% of earners you get neither space nor privacy.

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I lived in something a little similar a few years back in London (Camden). Depending on where you are in your life, this can be a good option for a while, and I agree it is little different to canalboat / caravan style living.

I was mid 20's, working in my first poorly paid job in central London after my postgrad studies..... oh and single. I got independence, a great location, no tassle of troublesome/changing housemates and peaceful enjoyment. Bills and council tax were cheap. Actually, I loved it and it was perfect for that period of my life. For me, it was a small affordable step up from a flatshare, as I had grown tired of flatshares by that stage of my life.

The emphasis is on living like this for a few years max though, as it is no long term solution to accomodation for anyone. This lady appears to be 40ish and planning this as a long term residence.

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As short term accommodation its fine. Some ski chalets give you a similar amount of space, one I stayed in had a ladder to the bedroom, which wasn't pleasant to descend at night.

If you live in Manhattan (or many big cities) you don't need to spend much time at home; sleep, shit, shower and leave.

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I lived in something a little similar a few years back in London (Camden). Depending on where you are in your life, this can be a good option for a while, and I agree it is little different to canalboat / caravan style living.

I was mid 20's, working in my first poorly paid job in central London after my postgrad studies..... oh and single. I got independence, a great location, no tassle of troublesome/changing housemates and peaceful enjoyment. Bills and council tax were cheap. Actually, I loved it and it was perfect for that period of my life. For me, it was a small affordable step up from a flatshare, as I had grown tired of flatshares by that stage of my life.

The emphasis is on living like this for a few years max though, as it is no long term solution to accomodation for anyone. This lady appears to be 40ish and planning this as a long term residence.

#

Ditto, I lived in Haringhey for a bit (till I came to my senses) in a old victorian detached house. Where every single bed room had been cut into two or three 'flats'. There was room for a bed and a small 2ft wide bit on one side. A dresser and a set of drawers. The other room was the combi toilet, shower, kitchen whereby there was a roller shutter behind the door. You rolled it up and behind it was a micro kitchen. Behind you was the toilet and shower head above that.

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When i left Uni Lloyds offered me a silly low interest rate graduate loan of £10,000. I went to Holland and bought this boat for £7,000 (which i just happened to find for sale again)

http://www.boatshop24.co.uk/17888045-Van-De-Stadt-8m-Offshore.html

I sailed it around the Baltic for 2 months and back to the UK, then lived in it for a year in while working in London docklands paying £28 per week including unlimited electric with no water rates or council tax to pay, before selling it for £10,500

He who dares wins rodney. But now how i wish i could return to such an easy life :rolleyes:

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We got the same 90 sq ft studios here in Battersea, London already!

http://www.gradpaduk.com/properties/griffon-studios

I live in Battersea, on Lavender Hill, and no way would I live there. Too much crime in that estate.

Student accommodation is small of course, I lived in about 60sq feet, mind you it was £18/per week. Great fun.

£235 per week is taking the piss, thats almost as much as a one bed in Battersea.

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  • 285 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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