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Html, Css And Js

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I am being put forward for a job that requires HTML, CSS and JS coding skills.

HTML I can write and edit (because it was quicker then a re-edit in Deamweaver for tweaks) but I am wondering aboutt CSS and JS.

CSS seems obvious as I can edit html, but as a seperate skill?

JS I have not learned but it gets applied when I use Dreamweaver anyway, and should be fairly easy to learn if required, but why would I seriously need this as a coding skill?

The role is content management and not site development.

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For a content management role I can't see why you would need Javascript. CSS perhaps - you may need to understand a little bit about styles and classes to change formatting of your content.

Anyway... CSS is fairly easy to understand, but like many of these things, it's about knowing what is possible and the "tricks" to get things working across browsers. Using Google and studying existing sites for examples / inspiration should mean you can pick it up fairly quickly no problem.

Javascript is actual programming, not markup and does require some skill and deeper level of understanding. I wouldn't worry too much though as for content management I'm sure it will be a case of calling someone elses Javascript code as opposed to writing your own.

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While the Nirvana is to separate content from style I know of very few projects where there is no style code in the html somewhere. There are always instances when you need a little tweek here or there. Full on CSS is another thing completely.

As for JS I'd agree that for content you shouldn't have to get involved, at most it would be a call to an existing function somebody else has written.

But the number one thing to keep in mind with IT related jobs is the recruiters often don't have a clue what they are talking about. HTML, CSS and JS tend to come as a block and most people wouldn't have a clue what the difference was.

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But the number one thing to keep in mind with IT related jobs is the recruiters often don't have a clue what they are talking about. HTML, CSS and JS tend to come as a block and most people wouldn't have a clue what the difference was.

Yep, that's more than likely.

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While the Nirvana is to separate content from style I know of very few projects where there is no style code in the html somewhere. There are always instances when you need a little tweek here or there. Full on CSS is another thing completely.

As for JS I'd agree that for content you shouldn't have to get involved, at most it would be a call to an existing function somebody else has written.

But the number one thing to keep in mind with IT related jobs is the recruiters often don't have a clue what they are talking about. HTML, CSS and JS tend to come as a block and most people wouldn't have a clue what the difference was.

Well yes. The best solution is to have an answer "I've got exposure to javascrpt at xxx company in 2***". Also try and have explanations for "gaps" or work you've done not in the specified field. The recruiting agent/gatekeeper is looking for reasons to reject applications (so their preferred candidate gets the post) and will seize upon anything that gives such a reason, even though in reality it doesn't stop you being the best person for the job.

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While the Nirvana is to separate content from style I know of very few projects where there is no style code in the html somewhere. There are always instances when you need a little tweek here or there. Full on CSS is another thing completely.

As for JS I'd agree that for content you shouldn't have to get involved, at most it would be a call to an existing function somebody else has written.

But the number one thing to keep in mind with IT related jobs is the recruiters often don't have a clue what they are talking about. HTML, CSS and JS tend to come as a block and most people wouldn't have a clue what the difference was.

Would you say full on CSS should be in the web developers control and not mine? Otherwise I have done a blag too far...

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The role is content management and not site development.

Ask the marketing people and it must have a 26" monitor, weigh under a pound and still fit in a purse or back pocket. Content which cannot be implemented is bad content. It pays well to consider the problems of the the developer when designing content.

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Get to know XHTML...very worthwhile.....this does separate style from content (well it should do)... style and content together can make it a right pain in the groin to manage...

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CSS seems obvious as I can edit html, but as a seperate skill?

JS I have not learned but it gets applied when I use Dreamweaver anyway, and should be fairly easy to learn if required, but why would I seriously need this as a coding skill?

I take it you're not a programmer?

CSS is Turing-complete (I've heard) and, joking aside, JS is a serious progamming language with interesting foundations (on the lamba calculus, I believe, and is Object-Oriented). I just had to debug some a moment ago and it involved abstract classes applying functions passed in to update the DOM dynamically. Not trivial.

What they want from you I've no idea.

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Ha, I am on the dread marketing side of things :) Analytics, optimization, SEO for this one. I just haven't needed to write actual complex code to achieve this previously.

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Ha, I am on the dread marketing side of things :) Analytics, optimization, SEO for this one. I just haven't needed to write actual complex code to achieve this previously.

Some CMS systems allow you to embed "real" code in there for various reasons. It's more likely they put a bunch of technologies in there because they felt like it.

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Some CMS systems allow you to embed "real" code in there for various reasons. It's more likely they put a bunch of technologies in there because they felt like it.

I would have thought that with a CMS, you wouldn't need to touch the JS side of things...

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I just had to debug some a moment ago and it involved abstract classes applying functions passed in to update the DOM dynamically. Not trivial.

Abstract classes in JavaScript? :huh:

Did you inherit the Project from HellTM?

but why would I seriously need this as a coding skill?

The role is content management and not site development.

Normally you don't need to know HTML, CSS or JS to update a website via a Content Management System. That's what a CMS is for in the first place.

But it's be handy to know these languages when something doesn't work properly. It makes it possible for you to investigate and find what the problem is.

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If the role is for a content management system, of which there are many, they all usually involve various templates that you can very easily alter in terms of the CSS.

Lots of such CMSs nowadays often have the page templates split up into multiple templates that collectively form the content area and you just edit them individually - either they have their own CSS or you have a generic default one for them all. Or the choice of either.

Can you find out what CMS they are using?

Lots of the systems use JS.

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Well, JavaScript for dummies is winging it's way to me now, a little knowledge is a dangerous thing. It will be another job where I have crammed my ass off for something they don't actually want. I built my first website in 1994 btw!

Seriously, I m just not the sort of monster who you want to have coding skills as well.

Perhaps my next job description will require fire eating.

But, while I have the time. ..

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Would you say full on CSS should be in the web developers control and not mine? Otherwise I have done a blag too far...

Really depends on what the scope of the role is but yes in general the core CSS would be done by the designer.

As I said the language of the web is the combination of HTML, CSS and Javascript and for technical roles you would be expected to know all three. If you are just adding content than in theory you don't need to know any, but I'm willing to bet there will be occasions where things just won't layout as you want or expect and you will need a small hack to the HTML or CSS.

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Agree with all of the above and if you do have to hand-code Javascript which is probably unlilkely it's fairly easy and there are some really good forums you can post the question to and receive the answer back within a few hours. That helped me out a bunch when I was coding Javascript.

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HTML is a bit of moving target, with new standards emerging, and new browsers to be supported.

I've found CSS quite easy to get started with, but also quite challenging at the more advanced levels, which try to acheive complete separation between content and presentation.

Content Managers and marketing people wouldn't normally be expected to have in-depth Javascript skills - as others have said, non-trivial Javascript tends to be more the preserve of programmers.

On the other hand, a Content Manager with strong Javascript skills would be a useful thing for a company to have when there are no programmers around. If you find you enjoy Javascript coding, you might want to consider learning other programming languages. On the other hand, programming roles would probably be outsourced to India before marketing roles.

I've found "JavaScript: The Definitive Guide" (David Flanagan, O'Reilly) to be useful.

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Started XHTML/CSS for dummies today.

Didn't know that CSS will be replacing display orientated attributes in XHTML, so I have progressed already, CSS is worth getting a grounding in for sure.

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I recently reworked a site a client had built, from table-based Html, into Xhtml/Css as part of the new design.

I never want to have to pick through Html undoing tables, inline styles, and so on again. It's like the days before .NET when everything was scripted and nothing was OO, and so graphically updating a website involved picking through hundreds of lines of interpersed programming and layout code.

The two main things which catch you (or caught me) are when you try to get something to centre on a page - especially vertically - and have it work in all browsers (without sticking it in a table with height of 100% and a td vertical-align of centre) and I had a bit of a brainstorm with the float and clear commands at first.

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I recently reworked a site a client had built, from table-based Html, into Xhtml/Css as part of the new design.

I never want to have to pick through Html undoing tables, inline styles, and so on again. It's like the days before .NET when everything was scripted and nothing was OO, and so graphically updating a website involved picking through hundreds of lines of interpersed programming and layout code.

The two main things which catch you (or caught me) are when you try to get something to centre on a page - especially vertically - and have it work in all browsers (without sticking it in a table with height of 100% and a td vertical-align of centre) and I had a bit of a brainstorm with the float and clear commands at first.

Good place to start when I do practical, as I have had real problems with this in the past on email templates.

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Good place to start when I do practical, as I have had real problems with this in the past on email templates.

Have a look at this as well...this is what the OU uses...

http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=sCikXGYgFwwC&lpg=PP1&ots=BoEOXjydok&dq=principles%20of%20web%20design%20sklar&pg=PR2#v=onepage&q&f=false

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  • 312 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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