Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum

Recommended Posts

  • Replies 54
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

I once had a look around a new build show house. All the usual tricks employed to make it look bigger & homely: - small furniture & beds, heating on full blast, cuddly toys in the nursery, sticks in vases, no internal doors installed (some rooms were so small you’d probably have to stand on the bed to open the door if it was there).

The house boasted full compliance to the insulation regulations, so I was surprised to feel a breeze when standing at the closed double glazed windows. All was revealed by looking under the window sill to see a 2cm gap all the way through the outside. Obviously the snag repair team hadn’t got around to stuffing in some rolled up copies of The Sun yet.

I have a simple test for any new build i take a look at, online or in person.

'Where would i put a computer desk'.

Bedrooms are too small, no spare/study rooms, living room wouldn't have space for sofa + TV + desk in a lot of cases. Of course not counting when they've tiled off one corner and thrown a 'open plan kitchen' in there..

Link to post
Share on other sites

they've spent so much on the land, they have to cram them in and cut as many corners as possible to turn a profit.

And they wouldn't do that for even more profit if the land had cost them far less?

When old terraces are replaced with rabbit hutch newbuilds do they even manage to get much more density out of them? Terraces have always struck me as using space much more efficiently than most modern rubbish.

Link to post
Share on other sites

And they wouldn't do that for even more profit if the land had cost them far less?

When old terraces are replaced with rabbit hutch newbuilds do they even manage to get much more density out of them? Terraces have always struck me as using space much more efficiently than most modern rubbish.

But terraced house buyers are just half a rung up the scum-scale from renters - give me a shiny new "link-detached" any day.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Terraces have always struck me as using space much more efficiently than most modern rubbish.

+1

I hate the way these new estates try to cram as many different 'styles' of house in to one area, all dropped higgledy piggledy so you end up with silly shaped gardens and weird parking alcoves. Just build a nice terrace of attractive identical little homes, with gardens front and rear for Christ's sake.

I suppose that would look too much like terraces oop North though, where poor people live. People would rather live in abominations like Ingleby Barwick (aka Ingleby toytown) near Stockton on Tees.

Link to post
Share on other sites

It's ridiculous! There's thousands of houses in Devon made from mud, straw and stone. They were built centuries ago. I'm currently finishing a round house made from the same. It's costs virtually nothing, just your time.

Link to post
Share on other sites

4. Buyers really don't know what they are looking at when they look at a new build. If in doubt take someone who knows to snag it out.

New builds are by and large pretty crap.

In particular young FTBs who are easily seduced by 'stylish' show house fittings, twigs in vases, etc., and don't notice woeful lack of storage space, or that the 'double' bed is actually a 4' with a stack of cushions all over it.

Let alone any of the actual building details.

Link to post
Share on other sites

All the newbuilds estates round here are like that...they look OKish until the people move in...then, with two or three cars a family, the place becomes a car filled nightmare...kids?..they arent allowed out.

I think the government or councils have to impose strict limits on the amount of space that they are allowed to devote to parking so as to discourage car use.

This never works as people just park on the pavements, gardens and verges. Add this to the fact that shops and other services are usually a long way from new-build estates which makes it impossible or dangerous to cycle or walk anywhere and forces people back into their cars.

Link to post
Share on other sites

As somebody who is woefully short of practical maintenance skills, a newbuild does appeal to me...

I'm going to get ripped apart for that bit of heresy aren't I?

Dont ever assume a new build is hassle free. We had more aggro with a brand new house than with our previous 50 year old semi.

Burst pipe fittings

poor finishing

doors that wont shut

poor brickwork

blocked drains (paint poured in toilet before handover)

etc

I could go on but I'm off out.

By the way the builder we had was Fairclough - now Miller homes.

Total tossers to deal with. I had never written a letter of complaint until I dealt with these clowns . NEVER AGAIN.

Link to post
Share on other sites

It struck me only the other day why I don't like the look of modern estates. It is the lack of front gardens. Everywhere you look is brick, concrete and tarmac. No green anywhere!

I don't remember where we were. But sometime back in the 1970s, my schoolboy self was with my mother, somewhere unfamiliar, and trying to find an address. While not detached, the houses had front gardens, and space around them.

My mother's remark sticks in the mind: these houses must be council, because no private developer could afford to leave so much green space around them.

Link to post
Share on other sites

As is so often the case if something stinks you find the government somewhere at the source of the stench. New Labour reversed the logic of the planning process which was supposed to prevent overly high density development and instead insisted upon it.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/politics/conservative/7807142/Coalition-government-housing-density-rules-to-be-abandoned.html

Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't remember where we were. But sometime back in the 1970s, my schoolboy self was with my mother, somewhere unfamiliar, and trying to find an address. While not detached, the houses had front gardens, and space around them.

My mother's remark sticks in the mind: these houses must be council, because no private developer could afford to leave so much green space around them.

Similar to large estate of council (many now ex council) flats not far from me: 1950s Alton estate, Putney Heath, SW15. Masses of green space, trees, etc. around the blocks. Flats themselves are also relatively spacious, large windows, all with balconies, plenty of storage space, good sized bedrooms, parking, etc.

All adjacent to some incredibly expensive private housing.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't remember where we were. But sometime back in the 1970s, my schoolboy self was with my mother, somewhere unfamiliar, and trying to find an address. While not detached, the houses had front gardens, and space around them.

My mother's remark sticks in the mind: these houses must be council, because no private developer could afford to leave so much green space around them.

Many councils built very well from the 1920s to the 1950s. After that it all went horribly wrong. A 1970s high density estate that I knew well in Kidbrooke was built in the 1970s and is now being demolished. Another of similar vintage in Greenwich has now been re developed as new high density flats in line with government guidelines, mad, quite mad.

Link to post
Share on other sites

The housing quality of the last couple of decades seems very variable in the UK; I'm in a very solid 1950s home, the other 70s/80s/90s/00s houses near by are not quite as good, but not as dreadful as the housing from the horror stories I've read here. I heard it's been much worse in New Zealand after its building sector got deregulated.

Edited by Big Orange
Link to post
Share on other sites

I have worked on the tools building new build estates in the past and id say you can get good houses and bad houses on the same estate, This is due to most of the major house builders only employing subbys so generally you will work on a price and not be payed by the hour so consequently you have tradesmen who can work very fast and still keep up a good standard of work but you also have other tradesmen who usually have a very good standard of work but cannot keep up the quality when they have to work at full speed all day long and have to start cutting corners to make the job pay.

When i say you can get good houses on the estate i mean that they look new and shiny and thats about it because the materials used are not the best and most of them probably havent been fitted correctly anyway, i would never ever buy a new build myself because they are not going to stand the test of time and a complete rip off price wise, plus id like to sit on my sofa and put my feet up after a days work without burning my feet on the gas fire thats installed 4 foot from the edge of my sofa.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.