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Realistbear

I M F May Acitivate A Massive Crisis Pool

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http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2011-03-24/imf-said-to-be-discussing-activation-of-583-billion-crisis-lending-pool.html

IMF Said to Be Discussing Activation of $583 Billion Crisis Lending Pool
The International Monetary Fund is working on activating its crisis lending pool, a move aimed at showing it has enough liquidity to help bail out countries in need and stabilize the global economy, two IMF officials said.

I know the tragic events in Japan were seen as mega-bullish for stocks and the Yen but I suspect there will be repercussions globally that will not be so bullish. With the PIIGS not contained and our own recovereh not as locked in as Osborne told us last year things could go a bit austere in the coming months and years.

Little wonder there is no much in the way of IR hikes going on. The black hole is still sucking the energy out of the markets and we could still be headed for a Japanese scenario.

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I saw this on Zero Hedge. My first though was that somebody high-up is expecting a big round of defaults a new financial crash and is getting the funding (printing) in place early this time.

So what to do? I have cash available to buy investments if there is a crash but don't want to leave it too long in case the world is flooded with freshly printed trillions.

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I saw this on Zero Hedge. My first though was that somebody high-up is expecting a big round of defaults a new financial crash and is getting the funding (printing) in place early this time.

So what to do? I have cash available to buy investments if there is a crash but don't want to leave it too long in case the world is flooded with freshly printed trillions.

If you want a home to live in and have the money to do it--buy a house. If all in the world fails and everything deflates the house will still be a place to live. IF you have cash and inflation kicks in with a vengeance houses may well rise again (but not in real terms for years and years).

TBH, I am tired of waiting and am buying as I think that my cash will be better in a place to live in than gambled on metals, bonds, stocks or whatever else you choose as a way to try to beat the system.

Houses are down a good 20-30% my way so I am satisfied that I am reaping the first fruits of the crash. 20% more to go down is a real possibility but when you are getting tired of waiting and renting.......................

Edited by Realistbear

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I saw this on Zero Hedge. My first though was that somebody high-up is expecting a big round of defaults a new financial crash and is getting the funding (printing) in place early this time.

So what to do? I have cash available to buy investments if there is a crash but don't want to leave it too long in case the world is flooded with freshly printed trillions.

Having just read the first post, my first was thought was the same. They are expecting something to give and are getting prepared to shower the bankers in cash again.

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Having just read the first post, my first was thought was the same. They are expecting something to give and are getting prepared to shower the bankers in cash again.

The IMF funds will no doubt be handled by an intermediary bank so the 500 BN will be subject to at least a 10% bonus at the end of the year. The Banksters already have 50bn set up for them for this coming Crimbo! Thank you IMF (also a Bankster family).

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If you want a home to live in and have the money to do it--buy a house. If all in the world fails and everything deflates the house will still be a place to live. IF you have cash and inflation kicks in with a vengeance houses may well rise again (but not in real terms for years and years).

TBH, I am tired of waiting and am buying as I think that my cash will be better in a place to live in than gambled on metals, bonds, stocks or whatever else you choose as a way to try to beat the system.

Houses are down a good 20-30% my way so I am satisfied that I am reaping the first fruits of the crash. 20% more to go down is a real possibility but when you are getting tired of waiting and renting.......................

If RB's buying, I Think I'll hold on for a couple of years, as he's a very good contra indicator

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Houses are down a good 20-30% my way so I am satisfied that I am reaping the first fruits of the crash. 20% more to go down is a real possibility but when you are getting tired of waiting and renting.......................

Agreed. There are nice discounts to be found right now depending on where you live. Find one of those, combine it with a nice interest rate (or lack of interest on your savings) and get on with your life imo. The remaining 10-20% is not worth waiting for depending on your situation.

I'll still keep a bit of gold/silver though ;)

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If RB's buying, I Think I'll hold on for a couple of years, as he's a very good contra indicator

MMmmm, just like my house price predictions? I just bought with a 20% drop from asking and a 35% drop from peak.

Who called it right on £ and Euro last year when both crashed vs. the $? I bet you failed to make the right move on those two investments? Am I right?

And what about my recommend on USD treasuries in 2010? Nice 13% return on a relatively safe bet would have beaten your investment recommendatioons by a mile? Am I right again?

Your predictions did not do so well so perhaps your recommendation to wait a couple more years sholod be seen as a signal to get in quick.

BTW, what were your predictions for the markets? ( :rolleyes: )

Don't hold onto your gold too long now...................... ;)

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Agreed. There are nice discounts to be found right now depending on where you live. Find one of those, combine it with a nice interest rate (or lack of interest on your savings) and get on with your life imo. The remaining 10-20% is not worth waiting for depending on your situation.

I'll still keep a bit of gold/silver though ;)

This is exactly my appraoch. Tired of waitng and tired of renting. Its been 8 years since I owned my last house and although most of it has been due to job moves its time to buy and forget price watching for a bit.

I do think the market will see another 15-20% or so down from here but I doubt the house I am buying will drop more thna another 10-15% as the seller wants out and got a big drop on the house she is buying as those people have fled to OZ and just want their money before the pound collapses and loses them 20% on that score alone.

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The remaining 10-20% is not worth waiting for depending on your situation.

Are you mad?

In what situations is a 20% reduction in house price NOT worth waiting for? 20% - actually about 40% of purchase price taking into account the interest you'll pay - will pay for quite a few years worth of renting.

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Having just read the first post, my first was thought was the same. They are expecting something to give and are getting prepared to shower the bankers in cash again.

This is just another well thought out step of the global elite to artificially impose a global currency and ultimately a global government (obviously not democratic) that will lead to even more power and wealth for the banksters and the elite.

So far only Iceland has fought this off successfully, I hope more people in other countries will wake up before it's too late.

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Are you mad?

In what situations is a 20% reduction in house price NOT worth waiting for? 20% - actually about 40% of purchase price taking into account the interest you'll pay - will pay for quite a few years worth of renting.

If you are not a cash buyer the interest effect wears off over time and inflation (if any).

I wont miss the money I am using to buy my gaff as it was the proceeds of sale from my last house. Upside is that I will no longer have a mortgage whereas, 8 years ago, I did. So I suppose I am a bit better off as a result of the long wait but had there been no crash around here I would still be priced out.

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http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2011-03-24/imf-said-to-be-discussing-activation-of-583-billion-crisis-lending-pool.html

IMF Said to Be Discussing Activation of $583 Billion Crisis Lending Pool
The International Monetary Fund is working on activating its crisis lending pool, a move aimed at showing it has enough liquidity to help bail out countries in need and stabilize the global economy, two IMF officials said.

I know the tragic events in Japan were seen as mega-bullish for stocks and the Yen but I suspect there will be repercussions globally that will not be so bullish. With the PIIGS not contained and our own recovereh not as locked in as Osborne told us last year things could go a bit austere in the coming months and years.

Little wonder there is no much in the way of IR hikes going on. The black hole is still sucking the energy out of the markets and we could still be headed for a Japanese scenario.

Global hyperinflation it is.

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If you are not a cash buyer the interest effect wears off over time and inflation (if any).

I wont miss the money I am using to buy my gaff as it was the proceeds of sale from my last house. Upside is that I will no longer have a mortgage whereas, 8 years ago, I did. So I suppose I am a bit better off as a result of the long wait but had there been no crash around here I would still be priced out.

You're about to lose 60%+ of your cash.

Mind you if you have left it as cash you'd have lost all of it.

:)

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If you are not a cash buyer the interest effect wears off over time and inflation (if any).

I wont miss the money I am using to buy my gaff as it was the proceeds of sale from my last house. Upside is that I will no longer have a mortgage whereas, 8 years ago, I did. So I suppose I am a bit better off as a result of the long wait but had there been no crash around here I would still be priced out.

That only works if wages increase in line with/ greater than inflation.

In other words, not like now.

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That only works if wages increase in line with/ greater than inflation.

In other words, not like now.

Increasing wages are certain to happen - these periods always end when the mob seizes the printing press.

Either Balls will get voted the ink or something else will occur to make it happen, but happen it will.

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Having just read the first post, my first was thought was the same. They are expecting something to give and are getting prepared to shower the bankers in cash again.

so times are hard, and somehow, a bank, comes up with billions in rescue funds.

Question...If times are hard and countries dont have cash...just where do the IMF funds come from?..and surely those that have the funds, need them.

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so times are hard, and somehow, a bank, comes up with billions in rescue funds.

Question...If times are hard and countries dont have cash...just where do the IMF funds come from?..and surely those that have the funds, need them.

The IMF has the power to water down everyones money.. with hilarious consequences.

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That only works if wages increase in line with/ greater than inflation.

In other words, not like now.

public sector pay scales are unaffected by the cuts.

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I read an article on thsi front last summer where an economist was questioning the role of the IMF. Here is a taste of it.

Having been given a considerable boost to its firepower only last year I feel that the IMF should be forced to answer some serious questions before it is given any more. Further I feel that several things should take place.

1. It has plainly changed from an organisation which helps with balance of payments problems to one which helps with fiscal deficits. Whilst this may suit politicians, taxpayers and voters should in my view be concerned about the moral hazard of one group of politicians voting to increase funds available to help another group of politicians which may include themselves.

2. If you take the IMF’s definition of liability then its members are liable for a total of US $333 billion.How far are we willing to let its role expand beyond this? I wrote on this subject on the 26th April.

I have a question for my readers here and it relates to the recent increase in loan capital for the IMF. This was announced to great fanfare at the April 2009 G20 meeting by the UK Prime Minister Gordon Brown. He announced it as if it was a rabbit from a hat. However there are potential implication from it, for example what would happen if some of the money was lent and the loan was not repaid? Who is then liable? Has there in any country been a debate on this? As the largest player the biggest potential burden is on the taxpayers of the United States but all G20 countries are involved and liable. This strikes me as an off-balance sheet liability for the taxpayers of the G20 nations.

As I have discussed earlier loan capital and SDRs are proliferating aren’t they? So how can the liability be fixed? I have seen this sort of thing before where just because something has not happened yet people assume that it cannot happen but what happens if the IMF hits financial trouble? Just as another example if 20% of the quotas are never actually paid then we are down to a share capital of around US $265/270 billion.

http://t.co/GGKIsvh

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so times are hard, and somehow, a bank, comes up with billions in rescue funds.

Question...If times are hard and countries dont have cash...just where do the IMF funds come from?..and surely those that have the funds, need them.

The IMF/WB/banksters have all the money the rest of us no longer have. They just sucked it all up, laundered it, paid themselves bonuses and are now prpeared to lend it back to us again at higher IR.

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Don’t expect an institution created under the Keynesian economic model to think outside of that box. It’s blatantly becoming more clear by the day that we’re approaching the end of it’s shelf life and they’ll flog it to it’s very end.

The only way we’ll see change will be after it’s demise, not before it.

It’ll be events like the middle east riots and the Earthquake in Japan that’ll build up and break it’s back and the sheer number of people in denial is going to make it a messy affair I suspect.

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  • 284 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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