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Shapps On 10 O'clock Live Tonight

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"Latest from Grant Shapps' Twitter

I almost hesitate to mention this but having been a guinea pig for 10 O'Clock Live pilot, I'll be on it for real tonight http://is.gd/i45yWa # 1 hour ago"

It'll be interesting to see how he gets on, it would be great to have an HPC or Pricedout member sat opposite him in the studio...

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Anyone with a twitter account to leave David Mitchell, a few valid points to ask Grant Shapps?

http://twitter.com/realdmitchell

What other than take the New Labour giant Marrow out of your and the Productions team’s crevis? The Islington set are clearly alive and kicking on the show.

Would love to think otherwise but the show will clearly tread the ‘mean banks not lending boo-hoo’ as opposed to the rational and sane view that they cost too friggin much.

Although good on everyone for twittering him, all for a bit of HPC direct action!

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"Latest from Grant Shapps' Twitter

I almost hesitate to mention this but having been a guinea pig for 10 O'Clock Live pilot, I'll be on it for real tonight http://is.gd/i45yWa # 1 hour ago"

It'll be interesting to see how he gets on, it would be great to have an HPC or Pricedout member sat opposite him in the studio...

Let's see a few more HPC comments on the C4 website

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Missed Shapps. Did he say anything of interest?

He's got nothing against renting, he's put trillions into social housing, but people want to buy their own homes. Interviewer said houses were overpriced but didn't push it. Shapps said he wants to see stability with prices not going up or falling for years. Not much else he could say really.

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I do like that show.

He said yeah prices are high, said average age of ftb is 37, more than doubled last 10 years, he doesn't want prices to go up or down he wants stability, the initiative is to help people like you kids in the audience (wink wink im one of you guys look no tie) get on the ladder.

My reading is he knows it's fked, as in knows it's a ridiculous situation, but his intended solution is no further rises and no falls, tough luck current priced out folks you'll never own.

What he wants and what can be done however are different things. He looked visibly more relaxed after that part was dealt with. At best their ideas are incoherent, but what else can he say.

Better than labour who would have blamed the banks for not lending, didn't say that.

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He's got nothing against renting, he's put trillions into social housing, but people want to buy their own homes. Interviewer said houses were overpriced but didn't push it. Shapps said he wants to see stability with prices not going up or falling for years. Not much else he could say really.

He always uses that word 'stability'. Sitting on the fence so as not to frighten any property owning voters. 'Stability' completely sidesteps any debate about the need for house prices to drop, and government intervention to stop this happening.

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Yep, a classic politicians reply - with this and the homebuy direct scheme (or whatever its called now) we and the wider public have no idea what his intentions are - and lets face it, anything else would be political idiocy. As market forces assert themselves however, what he wants to happen becomes increasingly less relevant.

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Yep, a classic politicians reply - with this and the homebuy direct scheme (or whatever its called now) we and the wider public have no idea what his intentions are - and lets face it, anything else would be political idiocy. As market forces assert themselves however, what he wants to happen becomes increasingly less relevant.

That's about it, isn't it? Forget fairness; financial inequality; division in society; public welfare; the next generation priced out etc

Political expediency...that all it's all about.

I've just noticed Hazel Blears is on that 'political' programme run by that Scotsman with the wig.

I'm going to bed.

Edited by juvenal

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Missed Shapps. Did he say anything of interest?

Besides what other posters already told you, Shapps also said that house prices doubled or trebled in the past decade. And he always says that, which is odd.

I am not sure why he keeps repeating it. It is such a bears' argument. But then he always follows by wanting "stability".

Which is an obvious contradiction, like saying: "Yes, prices are too high, yes this is a problem, and I want these prices to remain this high". :unsure:

Very odd.

And it was not a mistake, Shapps always, always repeats all these soundbites.

Very odd.

.

Edited by Tired of Waiting

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Besides what other posters already told you, Shapps also said that house prices doubled or trebled in the past decade. And he always says that, which is odd.

I am not sure why he keeps repeating it. It is such a bears' argument. But then he always follows by wanting "stability".

Which is an obvious contradiction, like saying: "Yes, prices are too high, yes this is a problem, and I want these prices to remain this high". :unsure:

Very odd.

And it was not a mistake, Shapps always, always repeats all these soundbites.

Very odd.

.

It’s a line of policy-speak straight out of The Thick of it

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He always uses that word 'stability'. Sitting on the fence so as not to frighten any property owning voters. 'Stability' completely sidesteps any debate about the need for house prices to drop, and government intervention to stop this happening.

That combined with his previous statements about wanting prices to increase by no more than wage inflation each year leads me to think that's precisely what he's trying to do. He wants things to flatline and for people to work on the debt. Long term? No idea what his game is. Stability won't increase affordability unless wage inflation picks up and prices do not. It's clear the government will try to avoid a crash at any cost.

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Besides what other posters already told you, Shapps also said that house prices doubled or trebled in the past decade. And he always says that, which is odd.

I am not sure why he keeps repeating it. It is such a bears' argument. But then he always follows by wanting "stability".

Which is an obvious contradiction, like saying: "Yes, prices are too high, yes this is a problem, and I want these prices to remain this high". :unsure:

Very odd.

And it was not a mistake, Shapps always, always repeats all these soundbites.

Very odd.

I put that very point to him on the Guardian live debate:

Either you recognise that price levels are unaffordable, and they should therefore drop, or you do not think the level is a problem, and can be stable at these levels.

I'd appreciate it if you could you clarify your exact position

That's a false choice. What I've said is that if pricing are stable and don't regular exceed, say, average earnings then this in itself would be helpful over the long term. This isn't an instant fix, but an instant fix solution of prices diving would have all sorts of consequences on for example people who borrow against their homes to set up small businesses.

http://www.housepricecrash.co.uk/forum/index.php?showtopic=160816&st=30

page 3 and 4

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Advocating a house price crash would be the shortest political suicide note in history so it can be no suprise nor should anyone be overly disappointed if the housing minister doesn't come out and say that.

Privately, the left of the government (which is from Cameron left wards through to the lib dems and includes Shapps, I imagine) acknowledge that housing affordability isn't at a sustainable level and are trying to manage a gradual deflation in real terms - which is probably in the best interests of the country, if not the best interests of frustrated priced out wannabe home owners.

Contrasting Grant Shapps performance against that of Ed Balls who was getting toasted by Jeff Randell last night really does show that there is real differential between the main parties for perhaps the first time since Blair became leader of the Labour party.

From my point of view, I am comforted to an extent that we have at least 4 more years of governance from a coalision (I don't think that the Tories on there own would be quite the same) that puts what they think is best for the country ahead of populist short term vote winning tactics of the previous 13 years.

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I put that very point to him on the Guardian live debate:

http://www.housepricecrash.co.uk/forum/index.php?showtopic=160816&st=30

page 3 and 4

Yes I remember that. Very well put. I didn't know it had been you.

His reply was the scariest thing I've heard from a government minister since the election:

This isn't an instant fix, but an instant fix solution of prices diving would have all sorts of consequences on for example people who borrow against their homes to set up small businesses.

Very scary indeed. Coz, this reasoning is well above Shapps' pay grade, IQ, and educational background, as this argument is based in economic theory. And if he said that in public it must indicate that he heard it from one of his bosses. And it is scary coz at it is partially true. This would be one item on the cons column, BUT it would obviously be outweighed by the advantages of cheaper properties (Please see my sig., for starters.)

Vince cable would never ever have allowed this partial argument win the day. Then again, Vince is out of the core since the Telegraph sting operation. (The b@stards!)

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Advocating a house price crash would be the shortest political suicide note in history so it can be no suprise nor should anyone be overly disappointed if the housing minister doesn't come out and say that.

Privately, the left of the government (which is from Cameron left wards through to the lib dems and includes Shapps, I imagine) acknowledge that housing affordability isn't at a sustainable level and are trying to manage a gradual deflation in real terms - which is probably in the best interests of the country, if not the best interests of frustrated priced out wannabe home owners.

Contrasting Grant Shapps performance against that of Ed Balls who was getting toasted by Jeff Randell last night really does show that there is real differential between the main parties for perhaps the first time since Blair became leader of the Labour party.

From my point of view, I am comforted to an extent that we have at least 4 more years of governance from a car crash (I don't think that the Tories on there own would be quite the same) that puts what they think is best for the country ahead of populist short term vote winning tactics vested interests, friends in high places and people of dubious character into positions of power, at the expense of the country's wellbeing just like the previous 13 years.

fixed that for ya.

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That combined with his previous statements about wanting prices to increase by no more than wage inflation each year leads me to think that's precisely what he's trying to do. He wants things to flatline and for people to work on the debt. Long term? No idea what his game is. Stability won't increase affordability unless wage inflation picks up and prices do not. It's clear the government will try to avoid a crash at any cost.

Given that HPCers tend towards the, lets say, cynical end of the spectrum, it amazes me how many take politicians at their word. Ask yourself, if you were in his position and thought there was a good chance that calling for lower house prices would p1ss of the majority of the voting public and very probably jeopardise your career, would you do it?

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Yes I remember that. Very well put. I didn't know it had been you.

His reply was the scariest thing I've heard from a government minister since the election:

Very scary indeed. Coz, this reasoning is well above Shapps' pay grade, IQ, and educational background, as this argument is based in economic theory. And if he said that in public it must indicate that he heard it from one of his bosses. And it is scary coz at it is partially true. This would be one item on the cons column, BUT it would obviously be outweighed by the advantages of cheaper properties (Please see my sig., for starters.)

Vince cable would never ever have allowed this partial argument win the day. Then again, Vince is out of the core since the Telegraph sting operation. (The b@stards!)

yup, he's a grade 'A' plank, but at least he's happy to put crayon to paper and admit it. It's funny really, his brief is historically one of Government's non-jobs as far as ministerial positions go really, but given the situation we're now in it is of acute importance, even if that fact is lost on a lot of people.

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Given that HPCers tend towards the, lets say, cynical end of the spectrum, it amazes me how many take politicians at their word. Ask yourself, if you were in his position and thought there was a good chance that calling for lower house prices would p1ss of the majority of the voting public and very probably jeopardise your career, would you do it?

I think it splits down the middle.

Loads seem to think that it is only Tory politicians who are evil and self-interested, while Labour politicians are in it for the good of society.

An equivalent number think that it is the other way round.

Personally, I think both views are the result of delusion and tribalism.

They are all politicians, and that is all that needs to be said.

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I think it splits down the middle.

Loads seem to think that it is only Tory politicians who are evil and self-interested, while Labour politicians are in it for the good of society.

An equivalent number think that it is the other way round.

Personally, I think both views are the result of delusion and tribalism.

They are all politicians, and that is all that needs to be said.

Amen to that.

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Besides what other posters already told you, Shapps also said that house prices doubled or trebled in the past decade. And he always says that, which is odd.

I am not sure why he keeps repeating it. It is such a bears' argument. But then he always follows by wanting "stability".

Which is an obvious contradiction, like saying: "Yes, prices are too high, yes this is a problem, and I want these prices to remain this high". :unsure:

Very odd.

And it was not a mistake, Shapps always, always repeats all these soundbites.

Very odd.

.

It's not odd.

1. Prices are too high (probably about 100% overvalued compared to wages).

2. Prices should remain stable.

3. Hmm, what other variable is there in 1.?

Expect 100%+ wage inflation.

If Shapps can team that with nominal house prices held in a range close to zero, he'll have fulfilled his stated objectives.

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  • 312 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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