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aa3

Japanese Highway Rebuilt After 4 Days!

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http://translate.google.com/translate?js=n&prev=_t&hl=en&ie=UTF-8&layout=2&eotf=1&sl=ja&tl=en&u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.e-nexco.co.jp%2Fpressroom%2Fpress_release%2Fkanto%2Fh23%2F0316f%2F

01.jpg

The picture on the left is what a section of the Great Kanto Highway looked on March 11, 2011, the day of the earthquake.

The picture on the right is what the same section of highway looked on March 15, 2011, four days later.

02.jpg

Here's a photo of truck traffic on the highway taken March 19, 2011.

AA3 comments: This is why East Asia is taking over economically. They can actually get stuff done. In many western nations this would take years of public consultations and approvals, and legal rulings before proceeding. And a large section of the populus and officials would question whether there even should be a highway there.

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http://translate.google.com/translate?js=n&prev=_t&hl=en&ie=UTF-8&layout=2&eotf=1&sl=ja&tl=en&u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.e-nexco.co.jp%2Fpressroom%2Fpress_release%2Fkanto%2Fh23%2F0316f%2F

01.jpg

02.jpg

AA3 comments: This is why East Asia is taking over economically. They can actually get stuff done. In many western nations this would take years of public consultations and approvals, and legal rulings before proceeding. And a large section of the populus and officials would question whether there even should be a highway there.

I'm sure it's true about the quick repair but I would be more assured of it if the photo of the repair had been taken at the actual point of repair in the first photo rather than several hundred metres along from it (a like for like image) and you can still see the machines working in the distance at that point of the repair - looking on the positive side perhaps they're just tidying up on the last stretch.

Mind you it's true - in the UK they would have to build a new temporary motorway around the repair taking years and years before they even started on the actual repair. That's if they ever got started in the first place.

There was some improvement in that sort of stuff in around the 90s but since 1997 it went into reverse again and the UK's back where it started jobsworthwise but even worse.

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I'm sure it's true about the quick repair but I would be more assured of it if the photo of the repair had been taken at the actual point of repair in the first photo rather than several hundred metres along from it (a like for like image) and you can still see the machines working in the distance at that point of the repair - looking on the positive side perhaps they're just tidying up on the last stretch.

Mind you it's true - in the UK they would have to build a new temporary motorway around the repair taking years and years before they even started on the actual repair. That's if they ever got started in the first place.

There was some improvement in that sort of stuff in around the 90s but since 1997 it went into reverse again and the UK's back where it started jobsworthwise but even worse.

Ya the pictures are pretty poor comparisons. The most I'm willing to say on second look is that serious roadwork is going on to repair the roads.

I know China builds at incredible speed on projects. And one way they do that is by working 24 hour days. Generally the migrant workers, live away from their families so put in like 6, 12 hour days a week. And they have a whole ton of them who live right on the site, they have quite interesting multi-story temporary barracks that they set up first.

Whereas in western nations generally work is done on the 9-5 work schedule. With weekends and statuatory holidays off. Yet a whole week has 168 hours in it, a work week, just 40 hours.

The permitting and approval process is the worst part though. I can appreciate having a review board which grants approval or not, but having many different agencies needed to grant approval, is the classic non-job, non-work created, and often means projects never go forward.

Which if only half of projects are approved, it means all those projects not approved, all the men wh would be employed to work on them, don't get those jobs.

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Ya the pictures are pretty poor comparisons. The most I'm willing to say on second look is that serious roadwork is going on to repair the roads.

I know China builds at incredible speed on projects. And one way they do that is by working 24 hour days. Generally the migrant workers, live away from their families so put in like 6, 12 hour days a week. And they have a whole ton of them who live right on the site, they have quite interesting multi-story temporary barracks that they set up first.

Whereas in western nations generally work is done on the 9-5 work schedule. With weekends and statuatory holidays off. Yet a whole week has 168 hours in it, a work week, just 40 hours.

The permitting and approval process is the worst part though. I can appreciate having a review board which grants approval or not, but having many different agencies needed to grant approval, is the classic non-job, non-work created, and often means projects never go forward.

Which if only half of projects are approved, it means all those projects not approved, all the men wh would be employed to work on them, don't get those jobs.

Yes that as well.

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Before we all get too excited, let's read what the Japanese says. (Fortunately, this happens to be what I do for a living....)

[Photo on top left]

(Photo take around 16:30 on March 11th)

Damage to a section of the Joban Expressway between the Mito Interchange and the Naka Interchange on the Tokyo-bound lane. Subsidence of the road surface along a length of about 150 meters.

[Photo on top right]

(Photo take around 13:00 on March 15th)

The collapsed ground has been excavated, and work to build up a bed of new crushed stone [to support a new surface] is underway.

After they had laid and compacted the road bed, specialized asphalt-laying machines would have placed the black-top. It would not have taken them that long to repair this 150-meter section, and crews would have been working 24/7. So, it's not like they rebuilt the highway in 4 days - just a short portion at a particularly nasty subsidence. :)

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Ya the pictures are pretty poor comparisons. The most I'm willing to say on second look is that serious roadwork is going on to repair the roads.

I know China builds at incredible speed on projects. And one way they do that is by working 24 hour days. Generally the migrant workers, live away from their families so put in like 6, 12 hour days a week. And they have a whole ton of them who live right on the site, they have quite interesting multi-story temporary barracks that they set up first.

Whereas in western nations generally work is done on the 9-5 work schedule. With weekends and statuatory holidays off. Yet a whole week has 168 hours in it, a work week, just 40 hours

Its not emergency is it? in Japan it is, so they will blow for more money to get the same job done.

A similar situation was in California after the last big earthquake, they had to rebuild big sections of freeway asap as it was an essential route - it was done months under schedule as the early finishing bonus was $100K per day.

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And yet it takes years to fix potholes in the UK.

I've discovered that (at least in my area) the key is to email/phone the team at the council who's responsible for repairing them. Usually if I report some, they are chalked out within a day or 2 and filled within a week or so.

Equally, if I don't bother reporting them, it seems that no one else is interested.

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When I was working in Amsterdam about 20 years ago, they needed to do major work on a central street, can't remember which one, but it was on my commute and close to the central station. They simply closed the street for a week, worked 24x7 for 7 days, and then it was done. It was widely advertised in advance, proper diversions were put in place, traffic lights were re-sequenced and it all functioned pretty well for that week.

Contrast with the UK where you drive past miles of half finished roadworks, zillions of cones and no workers at all.

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Yet in UK the industry is killing not many people. Even though the H&S system is too heavy and complicated the benefit is that people get home to their loved ones. This compared with years ago when the mortality rate in the industry was quite high (following is extract form HSE website):

For injuries, between 1974 and 2010:

the number of fatal injuries to employees fell by 84%;

the rate of fatal injury (per 100 000 employees) fell by 83%;

the number of reported non-fatal injuries fell by 75%;

At the moment M25 is 24/7 operation and one condition is to keep three lanes open in each direction at all times...The traffic management can only be put safely during certain hours and conditions so it makes sense to cover an area rather than a spot.

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I've discovered that (at least in my area) the key is to email/phone the team at the council who's responsible for repairing them. Usually if I report some, they are chalked out within a day or 2 and filled within a week or so.

Equally, if I don't bother reporting them, it seems that no one else is interested.

+1

I'm on a personal crusade to get stuff resolved in my area. I've reported fly tipping, graffiti, broken street light, tatty looking shop front etc. All issues sorted within a day or so. When they email me back senior managers are even cc'd. Guess I must've got someone's attention.

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We can get things done fairly quickly if there's an emergency; it didn't take too long to get that temporary railway station built at Workington after the floods, for example. For the rest of the time I'm rather glad I live in a country that won't thoughtlessly bulldoze a new road through anywhere it feels like (although yes, we often seem to go ludicrously far in the takes-forever-to-do-anything game even when there's little or no controversy).

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Yet in UK the industry is killing not many people. Even though the H&S system is too heavy and complicated the benefit is that people get home to their loved ones. This compared with years ago when the mortality rate in the industry was quite high (following is extract form HSE website):

For injuries, between 1974 and 2010:

the number of fatal injuries to employees fell by 84%;

the rate of fatal injury (per 100 000 employees) fell by 83%;

the number of reported non-fatal injuries fell by 75%;

At the moment M25 is 24/7 operation and one condition is to keep three lanes open in each direction at all times...The traffic management can only be put safely during certain hours and conditions so it makes sense to cover an area rather than a spot.

It's got hardly anyfink to do wiv that! <_<

Think of the millions of UK heavy industry/steel/engineering/ship building/coal mining/house building etc dangerous jobs that disappeared during that time period!

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I liked the temporary bus station they had in Bath a couple of years before the shiny new bus station was completed and the resurfacing of my potholed street after many years of neglect was done quickly and efficiently.

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Ya the pictures are pretty poor comparisons. The most I'm willing to say on second look is that serious roadwork is going on to repair the roads.

I know China builds at incredible speed on projects. And one way they do that is by working 24 hour days. Generally the migrant workers, live away from their families so put in like 6, 12 hour days a week. And they have a whole ton of them who live right on the site, they have quite interesting multi-story temporary barracks that they set up first.

Whereas in western nations generally work is done on the 9-5 work schedule. With weekends and statuatory holidays off. Yet a whole week has 168 hours in it, a work week, just 40 hours.

The permitting and approval process is the worst part though. I can appreciate having a review board which grants approval or not, but having many different agencies needed to grant approval, is the classic non-job, non-work created, and often means projects never go forward.

Which if only half of projects are approved, it means all those projects not approved, all the men wh would be employed to work on them, don't get those jobs.

thats not true at all. roadworks goes on in the uk 24/7 i should know my brother has worked fixing the roads in scotland for 20 years, nightime is actually the most active time for roadworks in the uk as anyone like me that drives constantly through the night will testify. The trouble we have in the uk is lack of funds going into repairing the roads, they dont spend even a quarter of our road tax on doing so the rest just going into the public coffers.

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contstruction-workers-funny-pictures.jpg

thats just nonsense, thats the scene you will most likely see in a council office not on the roads, they are pretty much all contracted fiirms doing the work and you work hard for your money.

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What!????

How can you say with any certainty that given a similar tragic national event that we or any other western country wouldn't pull together and get stuff done? The only example I can think of is what has happened to the UK psyche at times of war - people will sacrifice a lot in order to pull their country through.

I'm sorry but this is simply as silly presumption, speculative at best and doesn't really deserve much discussion.

http://translate.google.com/translate?js=n&prev=_t&hl=en&ie=UTF-8&layout=2&eotf=1&sl=ja&tl=en&u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.e-nexco.co.jp%2Fpressroom%2Fpress_release%2Fkanto%2Fh23%2F0316f%2F

01.jpg

02.jpg

AA3 comments: This is why East Asia is taking over economically. They can actually get stuff done. In many western nations this would take years of public consultations and approvals, and legal rulings before proceeding. And a large section of the populus and officials would question whether there even should be a highway there.

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We can get things done fairly quickly if there's an emergency; it didn't take too long to get that temporary railway station built at Workington after the floods, for example. For the rest of the time I'm rather glad I live in a country that won't thoughtlessly bulldoze a new road through anywhere it feels like (although yes, we often seem to go ludicrously far in the takes-forever-to-do-anything game even when there's little or no controversy).

Exactly, given any extreme circumstance things get done as people, communities and the country pulls together. This is just a silly thread.

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  • 312 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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