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Topher Bear

Landlord Referencing

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While filling out my latest tenant referencing form I got the urge to contact the company doing the referencing to tell them how unfair i think it is that landlords get to refrence us but we don't get to reference the landlords.

I have decided to search the net for all online referencing companies and send them an e-mail/ online contact us section to tell them so. This is what I am saying:

I would just like to say that I believe that it is unfair that Landlords get the right to check the suitability and financial position of us prospective tenants and yet, we do not have the right to check on the suitability and financial position of a prospective landlord and his mortgage position on such a property.

For the Landlord it is a business decision. For the tenant it is about finding a Home for them and their family and in such a situation it does not seem unreasonable to know that how much of that home is secured on a mortgage and if that mortgage is up to date and not in arrears. It would be nice to know that the house should not be repossessed from underneath the tenant.

Perhaps you should look into providing a landlord referencing service for tenants....double your income on each prospective tenancy!

Perhaps if enough people contact enough agencies, they may consider it. As I point out to them its another nice little earner, makes good business sense!

Anybody want to join me in my campaign?

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I always find out what I can about the landlords I do business with. I credit check them. I talk to the current tenant out of shot of the letting agent where possible. I have not taken out rentals before based on what I have uncovered!

Do your own homework...

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Well, me too. I have always checked all my neighbours, landlords/ladies and vendors more thoroughly than a credit check. You can't credit check them without their permission of course or do you want to share a trick... ;)

I always find out what I can about the landlords I do business with. I credit check them. I talk to the current tenant out of shot of the letting agent where possible. I have not taken out rentals before based on what I have uncovered!

Do your own homework...

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I would love this to happen as we had an absolute nightmare with the first property we rented when we returned from the US two years ago.

As we had no credit record on our return we were told that to secure the property we wanted we'd need to pay the entire 12 months rent up front as well as providing a deposit and a reference from my husbands employer.

We agreed and moved in to what we thought would be our happy home. within a couple of weeks all was not as it seemed. We discovered the landlord who'd moved to France was in a legal dispute with neighbours over access rights to the adjoining fields, a public footpath which ran straight through the garden hadn't been moved as the Landlord had told us and he was also being chased by the local council for illegally dumping thousands of wheelie bin wheels in one of the fields that the property owned.

He also made the front page of the local paper for calling a local man who used the footpath through the garden a pedophile, stating that he was only walking through the garden so that he could see his kids getting dressed in a morning..

After two months, the cops turned up looking for the owner and his 'stolen cars' then the bailiffs started to arrive. For 5 months we put up with weekly visits from them banging on the door at 7am on a Saturday morning. I always kept my ID handy as they never believed I wasn't the Landlords wife but also wouldn't believe that I had no forwarding address which is why I assume they kept coming back.

We also had people from the local council on a regular basis wanting to know when we were going to move the wheelie bin wheels and god knows how many lawyers turning up to discuss the boundary between the garden and the neighbours fields..the local running club also used the footpath on a weekly basis and we had a steady stream of about 50 ramblers walking through the garden every weekend..

Estate agent that rented us the property didn't care and wouldn't give us a forwarding address even though they knew what it was and to make matters worse we discovered a bit later on that the agent had actually rented the Landlord a property a mile down the road as they decided to return from France because the kids hated it!!

So yes, in my experience the more checks you can do on your Landlord and the house the better.

Turns out they never protected the deposit either, an oversight on our part but having just moved half way across the world we never noticed the paperwork hadn't arrived so when we left 3 months early they at least gave us back our deposit and the rent for the last 3 months. Although this was more to do with my husband threatening to drag the estate agent over his desk if he didn't get the money back.

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Anybody want to join me in my campaign?

Can't see it going anywhere.

Tenants who can pick and choose are the exception. The poor and vulnerable seldom dare to challenge their pimp.

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What I would want to know if the property was mortgaged is whether or not the landlord had the mortgagee's consent to let it.

If this is the case, it should be supplied to you by the letting agency. My LA included confirmation that the mortgage company is aware the LL is letting. I don't understand why it would be any skin off anyone's nose to confirm this in writing and if they refused to do so, I'd walk away. It's not like there is a shortage of rental housing in this country.

Edit: OP, I don't think you'd need to get a credit check and, whilst the idea is laudable, I don't think it is a goer. No-one will want to spend the additional money to find out. You could ask the LL to confirm in writing they are not in arrears in addition to the above if you want.

Edited by FaFa!

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If this is the case, it should be supplied to you by the letting agency. My LA included confirmation that the mortgage company is aware the LL is letting. I don't understand why it would be any skin off anyone's nose to confirm this in writing and if they refused to do so, I'd walk away. It's not like there is a shortage of rental housing in this country.

Edit: OP, I don't think you'd need to get a credit check and, whilst the idea is laudable, I don't think it is a goer. No-one will want to spend the additional money to find out. You could ask the LL to confirm in writing they are not in arrears in addition to the above if you want.

I mentioned this because I had a letter a while ago from my landlord's mortgagee saying that they had not given him permission to let and had just found out that he had a tenant so presumably he was on a owner-occupier mortgage. I didn't think that the LA would know this anyway.

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  • 312 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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