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amrhady

Landlord Requires 12 Month With No Break Clause, And Payment In Cash With Receipt

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Hi All,

I arrived to London about 10 days ago on a permanent role, have been looking for flats since and found one that i like (via an agent) but landlord is really strict, he requires

1. 12 Month contract with a no break clause (for reasons which he mentioned including that if i break after 6 month he'll have to repay the agent a new fee to look for another tenant)

2 . He requires payment in cash (claims that he had bad experience with bank transfers...he has a couple of properties and some tenants misuse bank transfers as an excuse for delaying payments. For example, he tells me that one tenant would tell him that the money is transferred and blames the bank for the delay, while it's actually not)

3. 2 month in advance and 1 month deposit

I like the flat...What do you think? And If I decide I want to leave before 12 months, would this be possible? (for example, In case i change work and want to look for something closer, or for some reason I'm unable to pay the rent) Can I leave if I left the LL the deposit?

many thanks.

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Cash payment wouldn't worry me as long as I had a receipt, but I wouldn't want the landlord banging on the door asking for the rent every month, so I would prefer to pay three months in advance and have him come round, by appointment, every three months to collect the cash.

With regard to cancellation before the year is up, I wouldn't sign a 12 month contract unless I was sure that I would want to stay for the full term.

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Hi All,

I arrived to London about 10 days ago on a permanent role, have been looking for flats since and found one that i like (via an agent) but landlord is really strict, he requires

1. 12 Month contract with a no break clause (for reasons which he mentioned including that if i break after 6 month he'll have to repay the agent a new fee to look for another tenant)

2 . He requires payment in cash (claims that he had bad experience with bank transfers...he has a couple of properties and some tenants misuse bank transfers as an excuse for delaying payments. For example, he tells me that one tenant would tell him that the money is transferred and blames the bank for the delay, while it's actually not)

3. 2 month in advance and 1 month deposit

I like the flat...What do you think? And If I decide I want to leave before 12 months, would this be possible? (for example, In case i change work and want to look for something closer, or for some reason I'm unable to pay the rent) Can I leave if I left the LL the deposit?

many thanks.

Sounds like a dodgy geezer who takes cash to avoid paying tax. Given his lack of respect for that aspect of the law, I'd question his respect for things like gas safety certificates, TDS, repairs etc. etc. I'd make very sure that you got proof that the deposit was put in the an appropriate tennancy deposit scheme.

I could of course be completely wrong. Most landlords I have known have tennant horror stories.

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Hi All,

I arrived to London about 10 days ago on a permanent role, have been looking for flats since and found one that i like (via an agent) but landlord is really strict, he requires

1. 12 Month contract with a no break clause (for reasons which he mentioned including that if i break after 6 month he'll have to repay the agent a new fee to look for another tenant)

2 . He requires payment in cash (claims that he had bad experience with bank transfers...he has a couple of properties and some tenants misuse bank transfers as an excuse for delaying payments. For example, he tells me that one tenant would tell him that the money is transferred and blames the bank for the delay, while it's actually not)

3. 2 month in advance and 1 month deposit

I like the flat...What do you think? And If I decide I want to leave before 12 months, would this be possible? (for example, In case i change work and want to look for something closer, or for some reason I'm unable to pay the rent) Can I leave if I left the LL the deposit?

many thanks.

Its a straight forward case to say to him GFY

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Sounds like the LL is either going bust or doesn't own the flat in the first place.

Either way this looks so out of the ordinary that I'd walk away and have nothing more to do with him.

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I don't see the problem with cash, as long as he provides a receipt, nor with a twelve month contract, as long as the price is right.

If my landlord offered me a 5% discount for paying a year's rent, cash, in advance, I'd bite his arm off.

I would interview the prospective landlord and make my own mind up, he could be dodgy, but he could equally well just be a bit eccentric.

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Cash only ? I smell a rat. Avoid.

People missing payments claiming they've paid it into the bank is no different from people making up excuses to why they don't have the cash on them

Edited by exiges

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I don't see the problem with cash, as long as he provides a receipt, nor with a twelve month contract, as long as the price is right.

If my landlord offered me a 5% discount for paying a year's rent, cash, in advance, I'd bite his arm off.

I would interview the prospective landlord and make my own mind up, he could be dodgy, but he could equally well just be a bit eccentric.

Maybe, but from what the OP's said there's a strong smell of bulls*** from what the LL is saying.

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I don't see the problem with cash, as long as he provides a receipt, nor with a twelve month contract, as long as the price is right.

What's the receipt worth if he just disappears and someone who turns out to be the real owner appears?

If my landlord offered me a 5% discount for paying a year's rent, cash, in advance, I'd bite his arm off.

I expect you have an existing relationship including trust.

I would interview the prospective landlord and make my own mind up, he could be dodgy, but he could equally well just be a bit eccentric.

Maybe if you can insure against being defrauded ....

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What's the receipt worth if he just disappears and someone who turns out to be the real owner appears?

I expect you have an existing relationship including trust.

Maybe if you can insure against being defrauded ....

It's fairly easy to check who owns the house.

Yes, I trust my LL. I also like to think that I can spot a crook.

What's the difference between paying cash or by cheque? He could pay the cheque into his bank account and draw it out in cash as soon as it clears leaving nothing for a court to freeze. It's only a few grand in rent, not hundreds of grand buying a house.

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What's the difference between paying cash or by cheque? He could pay the cheque into his bank account and draw it out in cash as soon as it clears leaving nothing for a court to freeze. It's only a few grand in rent, not hundreds of grand buying a house.

It's a signal that something isn't right. Why would an honest landlord want to be paid in cash? What is he trying to hide?

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I don't see the problem with cash, as long as he provides a receipt, nor with a twelve month contract, as long as the price is right.

When I was looking in London, certainly in the slightly better areas, 12 months was the minimum contract that most landlords would consider. Trying to negotiate a 6 month break would usually mean the rent going up by somewhere between 5 and 10% (presumably a reflection of the letting agents' extortionate fees).

There's nothing wrong with bank transfers - but a problem that I see time and again, is that people forget that they take (or used to take) 3 working days. Tenants would instruct the bank on the due day, and then whine when the landlord complained the rent was late. The idea of scheduling the standing order 3 days before the due date was beyond them.

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It's a signal that something isn't right. Why would an honest landlord want to be paid in cash? What is he trying to hide?

Okay, you win, I'm outnumbered. Anyone preferring to use cash must have something to hide. Let's outlaw cash and make all transactions electronic and traceable to your implanted microchip, you know it makes sense.

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When I was looking in London, certainly in the slightly better areas, 12 months was the minimum contract that most landlords would consider. Trying to negotiate a 6 month break would usually mean the rent going up by somewhere between 5 and 10% (presumably a reflection of the letting agents' extortionate fees).

There's nothing wrong with bank transfers - but a problem that I see time and again, is that people forget that they take (or used to take) 3 working days. Tenants would instruct the bank on the due day, and then whine when the landlord complained the rent was late. The idea of scheduling the standing order 3 days before the due date was beyond them.

My, very reasonable, rent is based on a 12 month contract which I renew three months before it expires so that everyone knows where they stand. I've just renewed, so have 15 months to go. My standing order is three days before the end of the month as agreed with my LL.

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Thank you all for replying. The landlord is an Accountant, so I think cash payments more likely has to do with tax.

On another note, do you think 825pcm is a good price for a 1 bed flat in bounds green? It's close to the tube, relatively new establishment, gated entrance to the block,ground floor, quiet neighborhood, nearby shopping center in wood green.

GMap location if significant http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&source=s_q&hl=en&geocode=&q=N22+7as,+United+Kingdom&aq=&sll=51.58786,-0.169381&sspn=0.043835,0.154324&g=N2+7as,+United+Kingdom&ie=UTF8&hq=&hnear=London+N22+7AS,+United+Kingdom&ll=51.601186,-0.121043&spn=0.005478,0.01929&z=16

appreciate your thoughts.

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When I was looking in London, certainly in the slightly better areas, 12 months was the minimum contract that most landlords would consider. Trying to negotiate a 6 month break would usually mean the rent going up by somewhere between 5 and 10% (presumably a reflection of the letting agents' extortionate fees).

There's nothing wrong with bank transfers - but a problem that I see time and again, is that people forget that they take (or used to take) 3 working days. Tenants would instruct the bank on the due day, and then whine when the landlord complained the rent was late. The idea of scheduling the standing order 3 days before the due date was beyond them.

That would be OK, except IME it is the agency who fill out the SO form just leaving the signature box for the tenant to fill in :-(

tim

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Sounds like the LL is either going bust or doesn't own the flat in the first place.

Either way this looks so out of the ordinary that I'd walk away and have nothing more to do with him.

I agree this could be a scam. It has happened a few time in recent years that fake LL tried to rent out flats they don't even own.

I'd be VERY careful.

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I agree this could be a scam. It has happened a few time in recent years that fake LL tried to rent out flats they don't even own.

I'd be VERY careful.

I'm sure it's happened more than a few times, it happened to a friend of mine about two years ago. She was renting in a shared flat in Kentish Town, and one day a man none of the flatmates had ever met showed up and demanded to know who they were. Turned out he was the landlord and the person they thought was the landlord was actually the tenant, had been subletting to them without the landlord's knowledge and had stopped passing the money on. He made off with a few months' rent before the real landlord realised what was going on.

Edit: Just to finish the story, he demanded they all leave within 48 hours, and I ended up helping her to move her stuff to another friend's flat while she sorted out a new place to live.

Edited by Dorkins

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I'm sure it's happened more than a few times, it happened to a friend of mine about two years ago. She was renting in a shared flat in Kentish Town, and one day a man none of the flatmates had ever met showed up and demanded to know who they were. Turned out he was the landlord and the person they thought was the landlord was actually the tenant, had been subletting to them without the landlord's knowledge and had stopped passing the money on. He made off with a few months' rent before the real landlord realised what was going on.

Edit: Just to finish the story, he demanded they all leave within 48 hours, and I ended up helping her to move her stuff to another friend's flat while she sorted out a new place to live.

Surely they would have had some sort of squatters' rights? It's not their fault if they entered into the agreement in good faith. It also seems to me the landlord was quite dumb in chasing out tenants. particularly ones who could help him track down the dodgy subletter.

Oh well, that's all for another thread.

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Surely they would have had some sort of squatters' rights?

No. They were tenants. The landlord grated a tenancy. The tenant granted a sub-tenancy. The sub-tenancy was valid even if it gave the landlord the right to forfeit the tenancy. He had no right to evict without a court order.

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No. They were tenants. The landlord grated a tenancy. The tenant granted a sub-tenancy. The sub-tenancy was valid even if it gave the landlord the right to forfeit the tenancy. He had no right to evict without a court order.

I'm not sure the sub-tenancy is valid if the sublettor didn't have the right to offer it in the first place. However, I agree that the tenants had the right to stay until the owner obtained a court order to evict them. That is what I meant by 'squatter's rights'.

As I said before, the landlord was foolish to allow his anger to get the better of him. He should have allowed the tenants to stay with the proviso that they pay him directly from then on, and that they help him locate the sublettor.

Oh well.

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Thank you all for replying. The landlord is an Accountant, so I think cash payments more likely has to do with tax.

fantastic. do you know where he works? tax evasion can wipe out his career. If you really want the flat, are sure he owns it, go for it. If he pees you off, just send a letter to his employer, the Inland revenue, and his professional body.

I really loathe accountants and lawyers. can you tell? :rolleyes:

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  • 312 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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