Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

winkie

What Can Be Done Differently?

Recommended Posts

The idea came to me whilst walking around the garden centre......looking at the cost of hanging basket liners I thought were quite expensive for what they are, between £3 and £6.....I overheard a couple say to one another that they will be using black plastic bin liners this year.

Thinking there must be another way, I will now be lining mine fitted with old pieces of woven carpet or old dark knitwear then cut up pieces of an old sponge, mix that with the compost to help stop water loss.

There must be lots of simple things that can be adapted to work given a bit of imagination. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The idea came to me whilst walking around the garden centre......looking at the cost of hanging basket liners I thought were quite expensive for what they are, between £3 and £6.....I overheard a couple say to one another that they will be using black plastic bin liners this year.

Thinking there must be another way, I will now be lining mine fitted with old pieces of woven carpet or old dark knitwear then cut up pieces of an old sponge, mix that with the compost to help stop water loss.

There must be lots of simple things that can be adapted to work given a bit of imagination. ;)

If you use old carpet, at least you won't have the birds pulling it to bits! I've found them nicking a lot of the mossy bits of my liners for their nests. It's evidently a hot choice for blue tit nests. (I don't begrudge them, though.)

Agree that they're daftly expensive. I've found so-called sheets of it that you cut to size, but the sheets aren't even big enough for two normal size baskets. I inner-line mine with plastic anyway, - they dry out far too quickly otherwise.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you use old carpet, at least you won't have the birds pulling it to bits! I've found them nicking a lot of the mossy bits of my liners for their nests. It's evidently a hot choice for blue tit nests. (I don't begrudge them, though.)

Agree that they're daftly expensive. I've found so-called sheets of it that you cut to size, but the sheets aren't even big enough for two normal size baskets. I inner-line mine with plastic anyway, - they dry out far too quickly otherwise.

Yes, I also do that, and I find an old small saucer placed in the bottom of the basket helps. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, I also do that, and I find an old small saucer placed in the bottom of the basket helps. ;)

Hessian sacks make a good alternative, ask at your pet shop or hardware shop if they have any spare.

Cant be bothered with hanging baskets though, too much hassle and watering and dont survive us being away during the summer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hessian sacks make a good alternative, ask at your pet shop or hardware shop if they have any spare.

Cant be bothered with hanging baskets though, too much hassle and watering and dont survive us being away during the summer.

Hessian, what a good idea, I think I will have to do a trial and see how they all compare.....luckily have neighbours who will willingly help out and visa versa. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anything which is marketted for a specific user group will be more expensive even though it performs the exact same function.

For example motorbike specific brake fluid costs £10 a bottle which can be used ONCE to overhaul your brakes on a single caliper system.

While car brake fluid is identicle but costs £2 for half a litre of the stuff. Same with engine oil, specialist mobotbike stuff is more expensive than car stuff. As long as you buy oil without friction inhibitors your oil changes drop from £32 to £10.... heh a few car oil filters also fit on motorbikes too :lol:

Same with anything really, skydive helmets are completely uncertified against impact damage and cost £200. Motorbike helmets are literally bullet proof and cost £30 for a cheap open face. Snow board helmets cost £30 are impact tested and certified and cost £20.

Thus never buy anything specific buy generic and modify it to your needs, if it needs to be modified at all :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Plastic flowers, set in concrete do just fine, don't need watering and flower all year long.

:lol: Don't you find they fade and bits fall off them..would look rather odd sticking out of the snow, but hey rather novel & cool. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thus never buy anything specific buy generic and modify it to your needs, if it needs to be modified at all :D

Ken, that is a very good tip, I will ponder over and action on. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pound shop?

Now the £1 shop is something to consider but it depends on how many £1s you spend.......there is the temptation to over pound yourself buying things you never would have dreamed of buying so pounding out on useful as well as unusual, useless......penny wise pound foolish. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

hessian really is the cheapest alternative that I know of but it is no substitute for proper management.

The best material that you can use is moss. Not the crap that comes with a basket which is usually coconut hair but peat bog moss, begins with an 's' and is known for water retention.

Even gathered moss from the woods would be a good addition to the soil.

Soil mix is important and water retaining crystals/foods are needed.

Really though, what a pain in the backside and a massive drain of time, effort and water. Plant a nice pot and use the many hours that you will save on watering for something useful.

btw a saucer in the bottom is not as good as lining a basket with clingfilm ;)

seriously though, bin the basket and grow a fruit tree.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

hessian really is the cheapest alternative that I know of but it is no substitute for proper management.

The best material that you can use is moss. Not the crap that comes with a basket which is usually coconut hair but peat bog moss, begins with an 's' and is known for water retention.

Even gathered moss from the woods would be a good addition to the soil.

Soil mix is important and water retaining crystals/foods are needed.

Really though, what a pain in the backside and a massive drain of time, effort and water. Plant a nice pot and use the many hours that you will save on watering for something useful.

btw a saucer in the bottom is not as good as lining a basket with clingfilm ;)

seriously though, bin the basket and grow a fruit tree.

Thanks for your useful tips, growing a fruit tree is something I will be looking forward to.....I find watering plants can be very therapeutic and relaxing, you become aware of how wonderful nature is and given the right conditions what can be achieved both beautiful and useful from very little....not to mention by being outside what the sunshine can give you in both nutrients and the feel good factor that feeling of the warmth of the sun on your back as you are creating something to enjoy both now and in the future. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Now the £1 shop is something to consider but it depends on how many £1s you spend.......there is the temptation to over pound yourself buying things you never would have dreamed of buying so pounding out on useful as well as unusual, useless......penny wise pound foolish. ;)

But you wanted basket liners? No?

And the pound shop is where I bought some from last year

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

But you wanted basket liners? No?

And the pound shop is where I bought some from last year

Yes, but little or no cost does not cost a £1. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was told you should never use carpets that are synthetic in the garden (most modern ones), although old wool ones are fine.

That's because they fall to bits easily and can't be retrieved (unlike a single-piece bin liner), and then the plastic photodegrades into ever smaller, inedible particles, and when the particles get small enough they can be eaten by insects and the like, blocking their tubes, and also entering the food chain (leading eventually back to us). OK, there's loads of plastic already in the environment worming its way towards our kidneys, from bags to crisp packets, but best not to add any more IMO.

What do you suggest then....I require some no cost, environmental friendly, animal and plant friendly, friendly to the eye, inspiration. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Someone on another forum suggested using old woollen knitwear, and there was an even better reply:

"I use old woollen blankets which I buy from charity shops for next to nothing. I've cut out templates for each of the different sized baskets in newspaper. Jak"

http://mygarden.rhs.org.uk/forums/t/4186.aspx

Cheers,......so there it is then, old wooly jumpers, off cut from old natural woven carpet and hessian sacks.....next question is the plants to fill it?.........I have a pot of rooting powder, so will give it a go of making cuttings from an existing trailing geranium...this is fun. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

bush tomatoes, not pretty but very tasty :lol:

Trying to germinate some of those....only eight seeds in the packet :mellow: ....will put some plastic pots on bricks and hopefully with a bit of luck they will overflow with tasty goodness. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • 312 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.