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If your boss hasn't worked out their problems then your report will fall on deaf ears.

If he does understand it then a report informing him of what he knows is pointless.

If you have some insightful ideas to make things better then get writing; I suggest you max 4 pages, just headline the issues and your solutions.

Although wonderpup is sneering at the concept, actually the only useful contribution IS a solution. There are loads of people who can just moan and say it's all [email protected] (often they spend a lot of time on internet forums doing just that.........).

once again I agree with the brush. Propose solutions.

Propose three solutions.

Two that you know will b rejected, and one that won't, being cast in a positive light by the less palatable solutions.

For this to work, all three must be plausible.

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once again I agree with the brush. Propose solutions.

Propose three solutions.

Two that you know will b rejected, and one that won't, being cast in a positive light by the less palatable solutions.

For this to work, all three must be plausible.

...agreed ....identify the problem ...that's what the financial analyst delivers ....propose minimum of two solutions from the fact finding ...otherwise you are part of the problem.... <_<

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I disagree with all of the posters who are saying that you'll just mark yourself out for redundancy by speaking up.

In a senior position in the company you're paid to make and inform the difficult decisions and shoulder that responsibility.

A senior member of the finance team sitting their passively whilst the SHTF is what will mark out as dispensable.

I also think there is value in the negative part of the SWOT. Most people on the ground won't be able to see the wood or the trees. An objective look at the situation with actionable points could really change peoples perspectives.

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Hi All,

I need your help,

I work in a company that largely serves the industrial and commercial (factories and shops) sectors of the market, although a lot of our contracts are 'government' funded eg Serco.

Yesterday, I posted our year to date selling figures to my sales director, both volumes and revenues are down against budget and last year, his retort was

"Basically, we are sh*t"

I want to write a short report that says that we, as a business, need to face reality, government funding is down, gdp and activity is down, business closures and competition is up, etc etc, you get the idea.

Do any of you hpcers have any ideas of how I should compose this report and any facts or figures that I could draw on to support my analysis.

I don't want to write 'War and Peace', just a few substantiated bullet points about why running to stand still is not good enough.

Thanks in advance for any ideas.

This is not a joke.

I attended a seminar on tendering for the public sector.

Public sector bods were there.

You will notice my unsubtle change of tempo about DIVERSITY>

I promise you, in these "hard" times...as THEY kept repeating, when YOU are lookign for funding, Government or Public Sector contracts, YOU are going to have to ensure you give THEM what they need.

and today, folks, they need to ensure that Policy led DIVERSITY within the Public Sector is continued right into your firm and out to your clients.

YOU will have to show them what steps YOU have taken to ensure YOUR business is as forwrd thinking as their POLICY requires them to be.

And this will mean proving to them you have a Diversity plan in place, with case study's ready and your staff being persuaded of its efficacy.

If I was you, Id ensure all this was in place, and your firm takes it very seriously indeed, IF they want to keep their contracts....remember, your competition will be complying.

To confirm all this, I rang an old friend in a Social Services Department...I breathed the word Diversity to her and her react was...you really need to see the time we spend with all that ********.....and this from a lady who doesnt swear!.

People here moan about diversity jobs in the public sector, but, I promise you...its coming to you too.

Raising Procurement Standard for Equality and Diversity!

Diversity Works for London (DWfL) is a programme within the London Development Agency design to enable businesses and employees to grow by measuring and managing diversity of the workforce.

DWfL is working towards the development of a common Procurement Standard for Equality and Diversity. The new Standard will assist businesses to tender for public sector contracts and will help drive through the diversity agenda.

If you wish to attend the launch of the Procurement Standard on 24 March and meet the DWfL team, please register directly via the following link http://www.rsvp-here.com/lda/dwfl/invitation/ (too late, this was 2010 I beleive)

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If I was to write a comprehensive report I would expext those who requested it could understand it, and not be precious.

I am currently in an interview situation where I have been asked to point out the benefits I would bring, but while touching on some of the issues that I would fix I have sailed quite close to making the director look stupid.

Problem is, the issues are schoolboy errors so I can't blind them with science, but if I detect that they won't change them, I won't double their conversion rate and I don't want the job.

In another interview last week I knew more than the interviewer, looking at the job spec that is what they wanted, but I sense a lot of ego in the way.

I hope I find a company who are all about the bottom line, and not how they bloomin' well feel!

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A couple of glasses of wine, and the desire to canvas opinion from a bunch of people who, the majority of which I respect for the knowledge, experience and differing views they bring to this site.

I still don't get it though. Writing reports and presenting critical information in a palatable way is a key skill. How do you get to a senior position within any company without being able to do it?

I'd go as far as to suggest that if you are genuinely looking for advice on this you've already been promoted to your level of incompetence. You should just carry on doing what you do and let your boss do what he does. Unsolicited reports, especially negative ones, rarely go down well. Would you like someone telling you how to do your job?

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Au Contraire, I'd counter that by saying its always good to get input from all sections of society where possible, becuase no one person has a monopoly on bright ideas and solutions. Experience can help provide solutions that have been experienced before but there are really a wide range of INTJ's and other sorts on here who could have some valid and credible input. The very fact most bears on here, especially the older ones proves their foresight to this global financial problem.

In some instances I don't disagree at all. However in this case it strikes me that there is a big disparity between his degree of superiority and the entirely basic nature of what he is asking for advice on.

The most constructive advice I could give is to go and see your boss and talk to him. If he gives you short shrift face to face then a report won't do any good. If he's receptive then you've made a start and given yourself enough room to take some responsibility in putting some kind of report or team together to look at the problem and work out some potential solutions.

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Sod it.

If there's glaring issues to be confronted/raised then do it. Chances are your boss(es) may already know, they just want some kind of report (official or contrived) to back their opinion up in order to justify any actions taken forward. A lot of directors play dumb most of the time for a variety of reasons.

However I've learnt never to present a problem without counter presenting two or three solutions. They might not like the solutions, one may not even be workable, so long as at least one solution is possible. Then sell it by advertising the benefits of its implementation, at least they can’t blame you for being negative or unconstructive.

Oh and I agree with the high level, simple bullet point approach. If they want the detail behind the dashboard, they’ll ask for it.

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Like I say, observation without solution is without value.

Sometimes the solution is to admit error- most bosses prefer to locate this error in the one making the observation.

Reality cannot be 'solved,' it can only be accommodated.

If the task of the OP is to present his boss with unwelcome facts as to the nature of the situation, he runs a significant risk of being seen as a problem locus rather than a problem identifier.

You demonstrate the exact mindset that creates his problem- the belief that all problems must have solution. In reality the fact that no solution exists can be the most important thing to understand- to say this observation has no value is foolish.

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The problem in your scenario is not gravity, it is walking off a cliff.

Sure there is some value in pointing out that gravity exists but its pretty low value. Higher value is pointing out that you are walking towards a cliff, higher still is offering an alternate route.

Who wants to be low value?

Walking off the cliff is the strategy that has been promoted by your boss- gravity is the reason that strategy won't work.

Your task is to tell your boss that his strategy is wrong- his reply is that you should find a way to circumvent gravity.

What is your 'value added' response?

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If the task of the OP is to present his boss with unwelcome facts as to the nature of the situation, he runs a significant risk of being seen as a problem locus rather than a problem identifier.

...that's what a Senior Financial Analyst does....unless he is just a bean counter which is not the point of the role...he needs to come up with an action plan towards resolution ...minimum of two for the either or ...(or)...if this is not delivered he will struggle to survive... <_<

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If there's glaring issues to be confronted/raised then do it. Chances are your boss(es) may already know, they just want some kind of report (official or contrived) to back their opinion up in order to justify any actions taken forward. A lot of directors play dumb most of the time for a variety of reasons.

As I understand the OP a report hasn't been requested. The OP is just having a Jerry Maguire moment.

It's interesting though, how everyone has just waded in with their approach, given so little detail.

What does the OP's job actually entail? What is his bosses job? Who does his boss report to? Who does his bosses boss report to? Does his boss respect his opinion? In my experience the subtleties and complexities of the workplace mean that approaches to this kind of scenario must be tailored to the individuals. Hence why I would suggest raising the issue face to face, even causually or off the record first. Gauge the ground and the receptiveness of the people involved. Judge their knowledge of the situation and their response to particular solutions. Whatever you do don't just write what you think and plonk it on his desk unsolicited.

Who is your bosses boss? How much influence does he actually have? In 2 months time will someone post on here saying 'my underling has given me a great report, I agree with it and his solutions. But my boss won't be receptive, what should I do?'

If so then you're wasting your time.

...that's what a Senior Financial Analyst does....unless he is just a bean counter which is not the point of the role...

This is EXACTLY my point. It appears that the OP is asking for advice on how to carry out one of the most basic functions of his job. Something doesn't seem quite right with this to me.

When you say senior financial analyst - how senior? How many people between you and the board of directors?

Edited by frozen_out
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...that's what a Senior Financial Analyst does....unless he is just a bean counter which is not the point of the role...he needs to come up with an action plan towards resolution ...minimum of two for the either or ...(or)...if this is not delivered he will struggle to survive... <_<

Agreed, if you are a junior clerk or supervised information worker then I would expect the role to be about producing standard reports to schedule and extraordinary reports to a detailed specification on request. But at a senior level your role must be about solutions and "analysis" not just slapping down the data on the desk.

Surely this difference in value is the very escence of the "senior" designation.

Disclaimer: I work in IT (Including BI reporting) not directly in finance.

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As I understand the OP a report hasn't been requested. The OP is just having a Jerry Maguire moment.

It's interesting though, how everyone has just waded in with their approach, given so little detail.

What does the OP's job actually entail? What is his bosses job? Who does his boss report to? Who does his bosses boss report to? Does his boss respect his opinion? In my experience the subtleties and complexities of the workplace mean that approaches to this kind of scenario must be tailored to the individuals. Hence why I would suggest raising the issue face to face, even causually or off the record first. Gauge the ground and the receptiveness of the people involved. Judge their knowledge of the situation and their response to particular solutions. Whatever you do don't just write what you think and plonk it on his desk unsolicited.

Who is your bosses boss? How much influence does he actually have? In 2 months time will someone post on here saying 'my underling has given me a great report, I agree with it and his solutions. But my boss won't be receptive, what should I do?'

If so then you're wasting your time.

This is EXACTLY my point. It appears that the OP is asking for advice on how to carry out one of the most basic functions of his job. Something doesn't seem quite right with this to me.

When you say senior financial analyst - how senior? How many people between you and the board of directors?

...you'll be telling him to hire a lawyer and a special investigator next.... :rolleyes:

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Sometimes the solution is to admit error- most bosses prefer to locate this error in the one making the observation.

Reality cannot be 'solved,' it can only be accommodated.

If the task of the OP is to present his boss with unwelcome facts as to the nature of the situation, he runs a significant risk of being seen as a problem locus rather than a problem identifier.

You demonstrate the exact mindset that creates his problem- the belief that all problems must have solution. In reality the fact that no solution exists can be the most important thing to understand- to say this observation has no value is foolish.

Yeah, if only we all had your advanced mindset we'd be doing as well as you at business. Oh, wait a minute.......

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...you'll be telling him to hire a lawyer and a special investigator next.... :rolleyes:

Why would I do that? The truth is this - if he doesn't understand his role, his company and his position within it he's on a hiding to nothing before he even starts.

I'll suggest an alternative approach - go and speak to the guy whose job it is to pass on the unpalatable info to the boss and raise your concerns.

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Businesses have an overly optimistic group-think mentality, generally.

This then requires someone to be given the role of providing the cold shower, in order to provide balance.

The person who provides the cold shower is derided and held in low esteem; the optimistic group think requires it.

Avoid the role.

Point out sales are down, and suggest the firm starts saving cash, in case it goes on like this for a while.

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I'll suggest an alternative approach - go and speak to the guy whose job it is to pass on the unpalatable info to the boss and raise your concerns.

...that's a bit of a cop out ...he needs to take responsibility and offer his analysis and recommendations....that is why you have Senior Financial Analysts... :rolleyes:

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Yeah, if only we all had your advanced mindset we'd be doing as well as you at business. Oh, wait a minute.......

So- I demonstrate an error in your thinking and you respond by locating the problem in me.

This is exactly the displacement behaviour I am talking about.

You have shifted from rational argument to personal disparagement- is the OP likely to fare any better when he presents his unwelcome input?

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Businesses have an overly optimistic group-think mentality, generally.

This then requires someone to be given the role of providing the cold shower, in order to provide balance.

The person who provides the cold shower is derided and held in low esteem; the optimistic group think requires it.

Avoid the role.

Exactly right.

One only has to look at the treatment of those few risk assessors in the banks who tried to warn about the credit crunch to see the reality. Despite the fact that it was their job to highlight risk, they were treated as troublemakers and some were sacked for their trouble.

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Exactly right.

One only has to look at the treatment of those few risk assessors in the banks who tried to warn about the credit crunch to see the reality. Despite the fact that it was their job to highlight risk, they were treated as troublemakers and some were sacked for their trouble.

It's not exactly right. As it turns out the risk assessors who warned about the credit crunch were wrong. They couldn't see that the taxpayer was going to backstop their losses, neither did they take into account that they had a small window of opportunity to make A LOT of money. The situation is much more complex than you are suggesting.

Personally I often find that the person who provides the 'cold shower' is usually self-appointed and usually someone who started out slightly cautious then became a parody of themselves.

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