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My Landlord Has Just Increased Rent By 4% To Match The Bank Of England Consumer Price Index

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My landlord has just increased rent by 4% to match the Bank of England Consumer Price Index.

Yep I have only had a 3% payrise over the last 4 years.

No, he's offered to let you stay there if you pay 4% more.

You can accept his offer, decline it (and look for somewhere else), or try and negotiate a win win.

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Your getting a below inflation pay increase. I'm sorry for you, but it is hardly your landlord's fault. If the increase makes your place expensive, perhaps you can negotiate a decrease by discussing it with them.

I rented our previous flat and accepted one rise without complaint (we were paying well under the going rate) and then contested the 2nd because rates had fallen on average, the landlord agreed to leave as is. If you're decent tenants and your position is reasonable you can often get most or all you want.

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I have only had a 3% payrise over the last 4 years.

You're lucky.

I agree with the others, if you're a good tenant then keeping you will be worth more than going through the hassle of finding replacements.

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My landlord has just increased rent by 4% to match the Bank of England Consumer Price Index.

Yep I have only had a 3% payrise over the last 4 years.

Supply and Demand dictate rental prices, not inflation.

If you think he asking above market rates for your area, then call his bluff.

Edited by MonkeyNuts

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point out that if you leave he is likely to have a void of at least a month since he cant start showing people around until you have left. I bet that a months void will cost him far more than your 4%, if he doesnt yield then either suck it up or walk.......but then I bet the moving costs and hassle will cost you more than the extra 4% too.

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i say call his bluff, explain rental prices are soon to come crumbling down as the maximum benefits for housing is int he process of being drastically cut. point out (if you have) you have been a good tenant, have a secure job (even if you havnt) and that you like living there, and if he maintains the current rent level (or only say a 2% rise) you will be likely to stay throughout the turmoil that will ensue over the next year or so, rather than him loosing you and perhaps ending up with a chain of people not able/willing to stay where each sucessive time he has a period of empty property, and is likely to have to put the rent down to attract new tenants.

most people i know havnt had a payrise at all during this recession, companies say they can't afford it, yet manage dividends, how strange, please don't feel hard doneby at 3% it's pretty darn good from where i sit.

if you have to take the 4% then transfer onto a monthly contract (ie a months notice), and prepare to move out once rents begin to fall

Edited by fiddle

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If you do have to move out, make sure you refuse to allow viewings by prospective tenants, so the landlord has to deal with a nice long void!

While that s indeed the posters right (if he doesn't want a decent reference) why would you propose such a vindictive attitude? It is not as if the landlord is proposing an outlandish increase.

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While that s indeed the posters right (if he doesn't want a decent reference) why would you propose such a vindictive attitude? It is not as if the landlord is proposing an outlandish increase.

Ummm...because I can? Because the cost and inconvenience of having to move PLUS the inconvenience of having prospective tenants trooping through his home seems to give the tenant the right to make things difficult for the landlord, in my view.

I think the landlord needs to be taught a lesson about good tenants, voids, and not being greedy.

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Rents need to be falling in line with house prices in the area that you rent. Tenants would have to be mad to pay any increase in actual rent at the moment. give notice to quit and find somewhere cheaper. These greedy landlords need to be taught a lesson . Its a renters market now.

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While that s indeed the posters right (if he doesn't want a decent reference) why would you propose such a vindictive attitude? It is not as if the landlord is proposing an outlandish increase.

A typical landlords mentality. Dont give a decent reference unless the tenant is totally compliant even if the tenant is acting within his rights. Its called blackmail. . 4% is an outlandish increase at the moment. i suggest witholding the rent and squatting for the next twelve months before moving on . Most posters on this site would provide you with a reference

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A savvy landlord will know that it costs the tenant way more than 4% to move home. Heck, it may cost 8% simply from an unavoidable month overlap in certain cases. However,. an equally savvy landlord who has a stable and good tenant should think very hard whether they wish to push ahead with a rent increase and themselves risk extra costs and a potential void.

For landlords who rent initially via an agent, threatening a tenant on a periodic tenancy with a rent increase can be highly cost ineffective as they may have to suffer not only a void and another inventory check in but also another finders fee from the agent in locating a new tenant. I could see the landlord looking at a worse case scenario (long voids expected) of up to 20% against a potential upside of 4%. That is not good business.

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While that s indeed the posters right (if he doesn't want a decent reference) why would you propose such a vindictive attitude? It is not as if the landlord is proposing an outlandish increase.

But if the tenant was otherwise fine, a landlord would have to be very careful in making up a lie as a reference when the only disagreement was the tenant exercising their legal rights following the landlord's rather aggressive rent increase proposal.

Messers Sue, Grabbit and Run, could well become involved.

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As others have said tell him to stick it.

Last year our LL/LA tried to stick us with a 4.2% increase and we said "an increase, we were thinking the rent has been to much and were wanting a reduction" with a bit of to and frowing we got a 3.4% reduction, offered 3 months up front reverting to monthly thereafter to sweeten the pill for them but also forced a six month break clause into a year contract on our side.

So I'd tell them you're not happy with that, try to back it up with comparable properties on RM for the same or less than you're paying*. The rent renewal is not a dictat from the LL but a negaotiation and like all neg there is a middle ground.

The worst he can do is keep it the same if you opt to go periodic whilst looking for elsewhere for 2 months and then he'll know he'll have a void which will cost hime 8.3% of what you're paying now for a year, worse if all he can get is someone on 6 months.

Edit for

*Bluff even if there aren't any, they are lazy buggers who probably wont check.

Edited by zebbedee

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A typical landlords mentality. Dont give a decent reference unless the tenant is totally compliant even if the tenant is acting within his rights. Its called blackmail. . 4% is an outlandish increase at the moment. i suggest witholding the rent and squatting for the next twelve months before moving on . Most posters on this site would provide you with a reference

It's slander, one data protection request and he's in the sh!t, all he needs do is say its not a cnvienient time, not refuse viewings. The landlord runs off and gives a sh!tty ref, the tenent can't find a decent place and suffers a loss as a result, nice compo! Ofcourse there's always the as we did, "we've been staying with friends" route.

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It's slander, one data protection request and he's in the sh!t, all he needs do is say its not a cnvienient time, not refuse viewings. The landlord runs off and gives a sh!tty ref, the tenent can't find a decent place and suffers a loss as a result, nice compo! Ofcourse there's always the as we did, "we've been staying with friends" route.

I totally agree that the tenant can tell the landlord where to go with regard to viewings, or even worse, allow them but surreptitiously put off the prospective tenants.

However, you are obviously not someone who has had to write employment references ;)

While Mr X was an excellent tenant, I was disapointed that he was not willing to allow me to show prospective tenants around the property and the associated financial implications.

No compo there - it is all entirely true.

Or, the landlord could simply not give a reference - he has no legal obligation to do so. The prospective landlord can draw his own conclusions from that, but he won't have the reassurance of a positive reference.

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While Mr X was an excellent tenant, I was disapointed that he was not willing to allow me to show prospective tenants around the property and the associated financial implications.

Thats not quite true is it now if I say "I'm sorry but that time is not convienient for me", there is a world of difference between not willing and you trying to compel me to inconvienience myself. Personally my landlord is in for a void as he's been a bit of a tw@t overall and we'll be doing the family/friends route. Amazing what a hefty salary can do for the greedy gits opinion, ref or not.

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Thats not quite true is it now if I say "I'm sorry but that time is not convienient for me", there is a world of difference between not willing and you trying to compel me to inconvienience myself. Personally my landlord is in for a void as he's been a bit of a tw@t overall and we'll be doing the family/friends route. Amazing what a hefty salary can do for the greedy gits opinion, ref or not.

Quote

While Mr X was an excellent tenant, I was disapointed that he was not willing to allow me to show prospective tenants around the property and the associated financial implications.

Rephrased:

While Mr X was punctilious in regard to strict legal requirements, I was disappointed not to be able to come to any mutually acceptable arrangement with him to allow me to show prospective tenants around the property and the associated financial implications.

Doesn't deviate from the facts but gives the clear implication that Mr X is a right little barrack-room lawyer.

IMHO it's important to distinguish between wanting to move because the LL is a **** / rent too high /inconvenient location/ don't like the house/ no garden/ no parking etc and getting all huffy about a perfectly legitimate business negotiation. Outside the charitable sector, anyone selling a product tries to get the best price for it. The buyer tries to reduce the price. If you've a willing buyer and a willing seller you either reach agreement or one of you walks away from the deal. No need for great moral outrage.

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A typical landlords mentality. Dont give a decent reference unless the tenant is totally compliant even if the tenant is acting within his rights. Its called blackmail. . 4% is an outlandish increase at the moment. i suggest witholding the rent and squatting for the next twelve months before moving on . Most posters on this site would provide you with a reference

It is in the landlords interest to keep rents reasonable. No doubt they will do there best to force the costs down to the tenants. When prices realign to *normal* levels it will only make the tenants buy or 'get out' sooner, leaving landlords high and dry quicker, thus helping the increased levels of landlord insolvancies we will see in the near furture.

When I say landlords I mean the wannabee gravy train jumpers we have seen towards the peak of the market.

Good luck to 'em I say, they are going to need it. :lol::lol::lol:

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Trying to get a rent increase accepted by quoting the CPI is, at best, a little cheeky. Especially as the landlord is probably enjoying extrodinarily low mortgage payments. I'd probably move out on principle, but then I have an annoying habit of cutting off my nose to spite my face so please pay no attention to me.

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Quote

While Mr X was an excellent tenant, I was disapointed that he was not willing to allow me to show prospective tenants around the property and the associated financial implications.

Rephrased:

While Mr X was punctilious in regard to strict legal requirements, I was disappointed not to be able to come to any mutually acceptable arrangement with him to allow me to show prospective tenants around the property and the associated financial implications.

Doesn't deviate from the facts but gives the clear implication that Mr X is a right little barrack-room lawyer.

IMHO it's important to distinguish between wanting to move because the LL is a **** / rent too high /inconvenient location/ don't like the house/ no garden/ no parking etc and getting all huffy about a perfectly legitimate business negotiation. Outside the charitable sector, anyone selling a product tries to get the best price for it. The buyer tries to reduce the price. If you've a willing buyer and a willing seller you either reach agreement or one of you walks away from the deal. No need for great moral outrage.

Sorry to continue off the OPs post but just how many rephrases do you think there would be after the data protection request? In my experience those who write references are not the sharpest tools in the box and have got into a position by way of the Peter Principle.

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In my experience those who write references are not the sharpest tools in the box

Ah, but you have only met a tiny minority ;)

It stands to reason that, on a site like this, the stories will nearly all be about 'rogue landlords'. Those who do have brains, have built up a business from nothing and treat their tenants in the way they would want to be treated themselves don't get mentioned. That is reasonable, because sites like this are here to primarily protect Ts from the lowlife that will prey upon them. A happy tenant has no reason to even read the site, let alone write a glowing testimony to their own landlord.

So, accepting that there are a thousand stories on HPC about bad landlords, please remember that although they are the majority on this site, they are the minority in the real world.

Edited by The Masked Landlord

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  • 285 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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