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cashinmattress

Soaring Petrol Prices Push Commuting Costs Higher Than Mortgages

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Soaring petrol prices mean that in some areas households are now paying more for commuting than on their mortgage.

The warning came from protest group Fair Fuel UK, which worries that the recent surge in petrol and diesel prices at the pump could tip the UK back into recession.

The average price of unleaded petrol has topped 130p a litre, while diesel averages over 136p. But in some areas drivers are paying a lot more. With interest rates still at a record low, this means that some people are spending less on their mortgages than on commuting to work.

David Cameron has pledged more help for families struggling to cope with the rising cost of living, with food prices also going up.

The prime minister said yesterday the rising cost of petrol and other things was "incredibly painful for families and business". He said he hoped "during the budget we will be able to do more". His comments fuelled speculation that the 1p rise in fuel duty, due to kick in April, could be scrapped on 23 March.

The AA expects the average price of unleaded to breach £6 a gallon this week (about £1.32 a litre) and also warned that people on lower incomes are struggling to afford driving, especially in rural areas where public transport links are often poor.

The AA said differences in prices are mostly down to the "Asda factor". It told the Guardian that the supermarket chain typically charges 2p a litre less than other forecourts and in areas with an Asda other petrol retailers are forced to match their prices.

The AA pointed to Reading (which benefits from the Asda effect) where unleaded petrol cost 127.9p a litre last weekend while in nearby Bracknell motorists were paying 2p more and in Newbury 3p more.

There is no relief in sight for drivers - Brent crude initially fell today but later leapt back above $114 a barrel.

Well, I always bang on about energy being the driver of the western economy. If it's not available (haha), or an orchestrated market manipulation of the energy market takes place, you can't afford anything.

Doesn't really affect me because I drive strictly on two wheels, bicycle, scooter, or motorbike.

How much is car/loan/insurance/maintenance/fuel costing these days?

Edited by cashinmattress

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I am saving money since the price went up as there are less idiots on the road getting in my way so i am getting far better mpg.

I've noticed this as well. Roads surprisingly quieter on my work run. I couldn't understand why at first, thought it was the school half-term but, no, they were back last week. So can only be down to one reason................rising fuel prices.

It has cut my journey by up to ten minutes every day.

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I spend about the same on petrol / mortgage

There's just as much traffic, it's just that ten times as many people are dawdling about trying to conserve fuel

Edited by pilchardthecat

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I "think" the roads are quieter - where are those road traffic diversity counters these days?

Petrol is 134.9p/L Ouch!

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At £6 a gallon, maybe £3000 for 15000 miles. 40 miles a day for a year-ish

Unemployed youths with driving license could drive legally if they paid £3000+, £4000+ (Car insurance is higher in areas of high unemployment)

£1000 to buy a banger and tax it etc.

Going on for £8000 to commute the 20 mile radius as your entering the workforce.

Salary is minimum, some £10 000.

Dole is 2500 if your living at home, were not even considering the adults living independently.

We need retired people to taxi around the youth to get this country working!

21st century public transport.

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Doesn't really affect me because I drive strictly on two wheels, bicycle, scooter, or motorbike.

How much is car/loan/insurance/maintenance/fuel costing these days?

A borrowed car I've coaxed it into giving me a real world 62mpg... granted I peeve everybody off by going no faster than 54mph on the motorway but that is their problem. I also fill containers at home and fill during the week to keep weight down to a minimum. What peeves me off is the queues. The trek itself takes 34 minutes in ideal conditions, but there are roadworks meaning the motorway narrows meaning even bikes cannot filter through and a 40mph zone which causes shockwave traffic jams every single day which means it takes 90 minutes EACH way...

Unsurprisingly I am looking for alternative work.

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At £6 a gallon, maybe £3000 for 15000 miles. 40 miles a day for a year-ish

Unemployed youths with driving license could drive legally if they paid £3000+, £4000+ (Car insurance is higher in areas of high unemployment)

£1000 to buy a banger and tax it etc.

Going on for £8000 to commute the 20 mile radius as your entering the workforce.

Salary is minimum, some £10 000.

Dole is 2500 if your living at home, were not even considering the adults living independently.

We need retired people to taxi around the youth to get this country working!

21st century public transport.

A lot of my biker friends especially the younger ones after all of their costs (and I mean essential costs, commute, insurance, rent, council tax and basic food are left with little more than £20 a week in their pockets. They know they'll be better off on the dole the thing is they really really hope something comes out of their sacrifices now... so did I....

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A lot of my biker friends especially the younger ones after all of their costs (and I mean essential costs, commute, insurance, rent, council tax and basic food are left with little more than £20 a week in their pockets. They know they'll be better off on the dole the thing is they really really hope something comes out of their sacrifices now... so did I....

I suppose your insurance is supposed to decrease, but suppose somebody crashes into you and then your back into to being skint.

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Are you guys serious... even if petrol hits £10 a gal ... and it will.... then people still need to get to work. Even on the minimum wage (for which nobody is gonna commute more than 10 miles for)... it would be worth working.

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I cycle to work - about a 26 mile round trip and am an all year round cyclist.

The traffic, since fuel went silly is way below what it was; it's almost safe these days. The number of cyclist has gone up by a huge amount, particlulary the further into London I get (good weather only :rolleyes: ).

I have driven to work on the odd occasion when using a work car, and very occasionally use the train. I can do the 13 miles on my bike in about 38 mins when I'm on form. 70 - 90 mins in the car, or 60 by train. No brainer.

Edited by pie-eater

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Are you guys serious... even if petrol hits £10 a gal ... and it will.... then people still need to get to work. Even on the minimum wage (for which nobody is gonna commute more than 10 miles for)... it would be worth working.

Not true, the stop point for me is £1.70 a litre, it gets to this point and I'd simply quit and do something else instead, my costs vs work isn't exactly working out great right now which is why I'm looking for something closer much closer, but alas this is easier said than done.... far too many fake jobs agents are offering.

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Some jobs have been coming up finally under 1 hr commute, 25k year. Sadly the train ticket is £157. Well into one months flat rental or after travel, working for under £7 hour. The dole is starting to look good even for those on an average salary.

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I spend about the same on petrol / mortgage

There's just as much traffic, it's just that ten times as many people are dawdling about trying to conserve fuel

Sainsbury lorries used to have "max speed 55 mph" printed on the back. Today I noticed it's down to 50 mph.

BTW - anyone who cruises at 54/59 mph is a dickhead - causes unnecessary overtaking.

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Sainsbury lorries used to have "max speed 55 mph" printed on the back. Today I noticed it's down to 50 mph.

BTW - anyone who cruises at 54/59 mph is a dickhead - causes unnecessary overtaking.

Except cruising at 60-65 means people keep overtaking you anyway. Cruising at 70-80 people are overtaking you. I've found even at 145mph people will try take you on.

I personally stay in the slow lane and stay behind a lorry, they usually never go faster than 55mph anyway. People were going to over take the lorry anyway.... what difference do I make if they were going to move out and overtake anyway?

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Guest The Relaxation Suite

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Well, I always bang on about energy being the driver of the western economy. If it's not available (haha), or an orchestrated market manipulation of the energy market takes place, you can't afford anything.

Doesn't really affect me because I drive strictly on two wheels, bicycle, scooter, or motorbike.

How much is car/loan/insurance/maintenance/fuel costing these days?

My previous commute in the home counties used to take me 90 minutes to drive 26 miles (the last 6 miles were city driving). Large chunks of the drive were spent in first gear crawling along bumper-to-bumper style. With driving at the weekend as well for family visits and shopping, etc., if I had to do this commute today I think it would cost me about £250 per month or thereabouts. We could afford this increase (just) but a couple of others I know on the same commute only bring home £1200 per month so if it goes up much more I guess they'll be choosing between giving up their jobs or eating damp cardboard they find out the back of supermarkets.

Edited by Tecumseh

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11.22p a mile

£400 a month rent.

Even with cheap rent, it's still a lot of miles for the fuel alone to cost more. Bolt on the total cost of ownership the equation is a little different. But then it'd still own a car even if I could walk to work.

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I've noticed this as well. Roads surprisingly quieter on my work run. I couldn't understand why at first, thought it was the school half-term but, no, they were back last week. So can only be down to one reason................rising fuel prices.

Not here. Busier than ever.

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maybe the yummy mummies will get rid of their 'because I am worth it and I must keep my kids safe' 4 x 4 behemoths and settle for a sensible car - how I wish those who don't NEED a 4 by 4 would see sense - maybe the cost of petrol will do it. ;)

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I'm seeing a big difference from the last time petrol was at this level. Previously people seemed to be driving more fuel efficiently, but this time around I'm just not seeing it. The road is still full of pillocks. I believe what is being saved on mortgage payments is being pissed up the wall in fuel.

Driving in the UK is like house buying, if it's not full throttle/screw everyone else then you're not playing.

Edited by MrFlibble

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Sainsbury lorries used to have "max speed 55 mph" printed on the back. Today I noticed it's down to 50 mph.

BTW - anyone who cruises at 54/59 mph is a dickhead - causes unnecessary overtaking.

Depends, if you tuck in behind a lorry to get the drafting effect at 55-60 then there won't be any extra overtaking. Just extra boredom..

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The roads are slightly quieter but not the marked drop off around 2008, slowly the roads (Harrogate, York, Leeds) have got just as busy until a couple of months ago. That said Spring into summer are always a bit quieter than September onwards.

I do 200 miles a week commute, so not massive and my weekly fuel has gone from £25 to £35 a week – that said if people are being pushed to the ropes on a similar increase it shows how flaky people’s cash situation is.

Public transport is not any cheaper though – Harrogate to leeds on the train return plus a return bus journey of 2 miles each way comes in at £11.70 a day!!!!!!

On the 'pillocks' maybe they are just annoyed at the people who pull out on you at 60 and then take 2 miles to go from 20 to 50. The real pillocks are the ones who crawl along at 40 in a 60 and care not a jot how their slow driving impacts on others. You may be making pence savings on fuel economy but that is at the cost of all those queing behind you who have to get to meetings, pick their kids up after school. And if you are disconcerted by driving in the UK try what it is like in somewhere nice like France - who don't have an obsession with property.

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  • 284 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
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      • up 5%



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