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What did he actually say?

The deficit is unprecedented, that goes without saying.

The debt was high during the 80s, but generally falling at that time, and always well below what it is now.

http://www.admiralpr.com/wp-content/uploads/UK-debt-since-1945.bmp

If he's talking about the present, the debt is obviously higher than it was 12 months ago, when liebour were in power. Thats what happens when you run a 13-14% deficit...

Why he would mention that, if thats what he mentioned, i dont know. Its rather stating the obvious, and not logical given that liebour seem hellbent on throwing us headlong into debt slavery.

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What did he actually say?

The deficit is unprecedented, that goes without saying.

The debt was high during the 80s, but generally falling at that time, and always well below what it is now.

http://www.admiralpr.com/wp-content/uploads/UK-debt-since-1945.bmp

If he's talking about the present, the debt is obviously higher than it was 12 months ago, when liebour were in power. Thats what happens when you run a 13-14% deficit...

Why he would mention that, if thats what he mentioned, i dont know. Its rather stating the obvious, and not logical given that liebour seem hellbent on throwing us headlong into debt slavery.

Thats why I was hoping someone else heard it as well and could clarify. I'm certain he stated both the deficit and debt were higher when the Tories were in power in defence of the cuts currently being made by the Coalition as a necessity to the finincial mire liebour have landed us in. I was sure the Tories handed over an economy running a budget surplus (even if not, the deficit could still only have been a mere fraction of what it is today) and we know the debt has been growing under liebour, so must have been smaller when the Tories handed over power.

I could only assume I had misheard or something, because otherwise his claim is an outright lie and yet it was simply allowed to pass by without comment.

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Thats why I was hoping someone else heard it as well and could clarify. I'm certain he stated both the deficit and debt were higher when the Tories were in power in defence of the cuts currently being made by the Coalition as a necessity to the finincial mire liebour have landed us in. I was sure the Tories handed over an economy running a budget surplus (even if not, the deficit could still only have been a mere fraction of what it is today) and we know the debt has been growing under liebour, so must have been smaller when the Tories handed over power.

I could only assume I had misheard or something, because otherwise his claim is an outright lie and yet it was simply allowed to pass by without comment.

uk_debt_20c.png

The National Debt began the 20th century at about 30 percent of GDP. It jerked above 150 percent in World War I and stayed high. Debt breached 200 percent during World War II. Debt declined to 50 percent of GDP by the 1970s and dipped to 25 percent by 1990. The National Debt began a rapid increase in the aftermath of the worldwide financial crisis of 2008.

...that's the understated one .... :rolleyes: ...and of course started to head of the rails when Nulabour and Gordo arrived in '97.... :rolleyes:

http://www.ukpublicspending.co.uk/uk_national_debt_chart.html

Edited by South Lorne

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  • 284 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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