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Reck B

Performing Right Society Ltd

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Ok, so we get the letters from tv licencing about watching tv in the office and that we need a tv licence (always gets filed in the bin) but now I have a letter from PRS saying they don't have a record of a music licence for my office address and that we may need one (

costing as little as £44 + VAT per year for four employees or less...)

They then go on to suggest how listening to music at work helps motivate staff...

77% of staff are more productive when good music is being played

and

1 in 3 staff are less likely to take time off if good music is being played at work

What a ******ing load of horse-****. no doubt the tone of the letters will get more and more demanding as I continue to ignore their attempts at extortion. Stuff like this really boils my piss.

In fact, thinking about it logically, if they truly represent artists as they claim on their letter, by playing the radio in my office, I'm actually promoting the very same artists to my staff who may go out and buy their albums.

I could send them an invoice for this.

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These cretins called me on the dog&bone insisting that I need a licence,even though I only listen to Radio 4.I gave them some fair but firm advice regarding sex and travel.

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My understanding is that they're really a private organisation who go around chasing copyright on behalf of some clients who've signed up for them to do so. So as it stands they're talking complete bull that you need anything from them by law. You might need permission from the copyright holder, who might've delegated that responsibility to the PRS, but that's not the same thing. They seem to pretend that they're some sort of official body, but they're nothing of the sort, and in many ways are even more odious than the TV licencing lot (their members are already getting paid royalties by the radio station, quite why anyone thinks that they should get paid again is beyond me although the law may well line up with them on that one).

They also seem to hassle people about live music, and I've heard stories of some real nonsense about them claiming people need a licence from them to play their own music in public.

That all said I'd hate to work somewhere that had someone else's choice of music playing all day.

Usual caveats apply about me not being a lawyer and quite possibily talking a load of nonsense.

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If you are playing the radio in the office you need a "licence" from them.

However if they can't gain public access to your building they have no way of knowing what you are doing so you can continue to ignore it. The risk is they might wish to civil action against you, these cases do happen from time to time.

As long as the public don't have access to your office and none of your employees grass the office up, you can safely ignore. To sue you they will need evidence that you are breaching the copyright of the artists that they represent. Listening to talk only radio isn't exempt as they have jingles written by /played by artists who the PRS represent.

You can get royalty free music but you might not want to listen to it, if it is genuinely royalty free you can't be touched. It would certainly make an interesting case, I remember someone on here posting that even in this case they'll still try to extort money from you claiming that said person "might" join and therefore they should collect the money.

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I got a call from them the other week. (Not relevant to me.) They seem to be employing youngsters to harass people who might listen to the radio or play a CD.

They've probably got some Young Turk Exec in with a marketing plan to 'grow' the business.

As has been stated, royalties are paid and collected for airplay (the radio station would hope people are listening...)

It's a bit like insurance, particularly Public Liability, which often hits the small organisation who through ignorance and a blurring of the rules end up being covered twice (group and supplier of services).

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I detest the idea that something that is already paid for by the broadcaster placing it in the public domain, has to be "licensed" by you in case others might overhear the broadcast, which they are perfectly entitled to, of course. It smacks of double-taxation.

If you want to listen to BBC or commercial radio (playing PRS and PPL affiliated artists’ music) or play music at a venue/in the workplace, where members of the public, staff or work colleagues can also hear it, there is no way to avoid being subject to these licence fees.

Didn't Kwikfit get their asses sued because the mechanics listened to their radios whilst they worked?

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Can I just clarify? This applies to simply listening to the radio at work, whether in an office or on a building site?

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What a ******ing load of horse-****. no doubt the tone of the letters will get more and more demanding as I continue to ignore their attempts at extortion. Stuff like this really boils my piss.

No, I had the same one a couple of years ago, threw it in the bin, not heard from them since.

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Can I just clarify? This applies to simply listening to the radio at work, whether in an office or on a building site?

If you want to play the radio in a public place (clearly defined in law) you need a public performance licence from PRS and PPL. One is for songwriters the other PPL is the artist and record companies. Our company a large multinational consultancy and has to get clearance from both yearly.

However if your office is closed to the public and within a tower with foyer security before getting to your place it's unlikely it would be pursued.

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As has been stated, royalties are paid and collected for airplay (the radio station would hope people are listening...)

I'm surprised no one has tried counter suing the PRS and PPL for advertising said music and countercharged them for public advertising.

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Is it not just a scam people?

Like some boiler room operation trying to relieve people of their credit card detials in return for some bogus quazi official certificate based on half truths?

Sure sounds like it

edit: the phonecall part, i understand that their is an 'official' license you have (are encouraged) to buy

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I got a call from them the other week. (Not relevant to me.) They seem to be employing youngsters to harass people who might listen to the radio or play a CD.

They've probably got some Young Turk Exec in with a marketing plan to 'grow' the business.

As has been stated, royalties are paid and collected for airplay (the radio station would hope people are listening...)

It's a bit like insurance, particularly Public Liability, which often hits the small organisation who through ignorance and a blurring of the rules end up being covered twice (group and supplier of services).

The young Turk is paid £425,000 a year!

Last year it raked in more than £600m in royalties, an overall increase of more than 8% from 2007, to make up for stagnating CD sales and widespread illegal downloading. Its highest-paid director received £425,000 in 2007, three times as much as the head of the DVLA, which licenses 42m drivers.

Timesonline

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I started getting 'phone calls from them recently (last week, or possibly the week before).

"Hello, this is Ms Annoying from PRS. We'd like to discuss how music is used in the workplace"

"It isn't"

[launches into some script]

[hang up]

Same call at the same time next day, but I just rejected it (was just going out at the time) and ignored the voicemail.

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Wikipedia, my emphasis.

Any further information on that? The Wikipedia article appears to reaffirm the view that the scum are somehow trying to claim that you need a licence from them whatever music you're performing live, which is clearly complete and utter bull. I've heard similar stories about genuine live performances (as opposed to someone singing to themselves). If they're more than just stories they really should end up in court themselves.

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Any further information on that? The Wikipedia article appears to reaffirm the view that the scum are somehow trying to claim that you need a licence from them whatever music you're performing live, which is clearly complete and utter bull. I've heard similar stories about genuine live performances (as opposed to someone singing to themselves). If they're more than just stories they really should end up in court themselves.

The way to combat this is for anyone who has paid up to sue them via the small claims court for the return of their money.This system is strongly biased in favour of the claimant as the defendant has to either give in or mount a defence.This will cost them a lot of money and even if they succeed they cannot claim any costs from the claimant.It's an excellent way for a small man to bully a big one. If you have stumped up and want to pursue this contact me and I will do it for you or give advice.

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The way to combat this is for anyone who has paid up to sue them via the small claims court for the return of their money.This system is strongly biased in favour of the claimant as the defendant has to either give in or mount a defence.This will cost them a lot of money and even if they succeed they cannot claim any costs from the claimant.It's an excellent way for a small man to bully a big one. If you have stumped up and want to pursue this contact me and I will do it for you or give advice.

I think that they're within their rights for some of what they claim - the listening to the radio part, for example, as long as it's playing something that their members have agreed to let them chase. It's ludicrous that that's true, but the law often stinks. It stinks slightly less on genuine live performance of someone else's music. I guess you'd need cases where they've bullied people with no case whatsoever. What I would like to see them sued for is trying to appear as some sort of official body. Admittedly that's all second-hand stories that give me the impression that they do that, and no doubt they've got just enough hidden-away small print saying that they're not in some obfuscated manner to get around that.

Personally I'm not affected.

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So, If I get a bit short of the readies, take my guitar and stand on the street corner, I've got to get a licence?

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So, If I get a bit short of the readies, take my guitar and stand on the street corner, I've got to get a licence?

Quite possibly multiple licenses. One for the right to perform from the local council, and one from the PRS.

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Problem is, there might be some dispute as to whether the row I make is'music'

Um, that would be a charitable description of the stuff that generates the great majority of PRS income.

There's a lot of fantastic music that's out of copyright and thus Free. I expect that's why they've started to market bland muzak as "classical", to try and convince sheeple that what's out of copyright is like that and not worth playing.

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  • 312 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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